1. Have you installed the new JSF Mobile app? Check out all the details here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. One account & one avatar for all of JSF. Unified login and profile. Forum alerts on the main site, and more. Check out the details here: Forum & main site unified account feature is live!
    Dismiss Notice

Your thoughts on pork chops when dieting...

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by thisisme, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. thisisme

    thisisme Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was wondering what everyone's take on pork chops were when dieting. I'm trying to encorporate different kinds of meats into my diet as I usually break my diet when I get tired of eating the same things over and over. I know the fat content is a little higher than chicken or turkey, but it still has a high content of protein and not an EXTREME amount of fat.
     
  2. psuguy98

    psuguy98 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2004
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    I like them in moderation, especially the center cut. The only problem I have is that price. A decent chop is usually more than chicken or tuna, and the cheaper cuts tend to be like chewing on shoe leather.

    As a matter of fact, I just bought a pork loin roast tonight ( along with about 10 lbs of other meat as well)
     
  3. inurb

    inurb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wish costco had frozen pork chops. I always buy the 6.5 lb bag of frozen skinless chicken breast from there. I'd like to vary it up a little. I eat chicken breast all the time so it gets boring.
     
  4. doordude42

    doordude42 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Messages:
    10,230
    Likes Received:
    0
    I love pork chops and ate them throughout my cut. (sparingly of course)
     
  5. JabbaTheGutt

    JabbaTheGutt Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    Messages:
    464
    Likes Received:
    0
    These guys would all easily lose some weight without their "Pork Chops"... ;)

    Good luck,

    G

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Glaive

    Glaive Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Messages:
    717
    Likes Received:
    1
    At my Whole Foods pork chops of various kinds are priced pretty comparitively to boneless/skinless chicken breasts. Yes, they are somewhat more fatty, but everything is fine in moderation. Conversely, you could always just trim off the excess fat since pork fat (at least on pork chops) is generally all right along the outer edge rather than riddled throughout the meat.

    As for being "tough as shoe leather," I've never had that experience with any cut of pork, except when someone else was cooking it. Because the fat in pork isn't marbled everywhere like in beef the meat is much easier to dry out if overcooked. One must be careful to maximize the amount of moisture in the meat.

    Personally, I prefer the thin-cut pork loin rib chops. I rub both sides with olive oil, season, sear both sides for about 45 seconds in a very hot pan and then put the whole pan into a 500 degree oven, cooking for 2 1/2 minutes per side. Remove after cooking and place on a plate covered with aluminum foil and allow to rest for 5 minutes.

    Voila, perfect pork chops. This works great for any kind of pork chop, you just have to adjust the cooking time accordingly. The thicker ones usually get 4 to 4 1/2 minutes per side with me.:eat:
     
  7. guava

    guava Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    Messages:
    12,604
    Likes Received:
    19
    From Cook's Thesaurus (with pics)
    pork chop Notes: Pork chops usually turn out juicier if they're thick and if they're attached to bone. Several different cuts are called pork chops. The most tender and expensive ones are the pork loin chop and the pork rib chop. Next in the tenderness hierarchy are the pork sirloin chop, pork top loin chop, and the pork loin blade chop. Pork arm steaks and pork blade steaks are relatively tough and fatty, but they're very flavorful. They're better if they're braised rather than grilled, broiled, or fried. Substitutes: pork tenderloin (cut into medallions) OR lamb chop OR steak

    When I eat pork, I usually choose pork tenderloin. You can slice it into steak-like dimensions before cooking if you like. Usually, I stay away from the pork blade steak because of all the fat in it. I wouldn't even consider eating ribs anymore. They have more calories than hot dogs!

    Approximate Calories of Different Cuts of Pork
    Tenderloin, roasted 140
    Center Loin Chop, broiled/grilled 165
    Loin Chop, no bone, broiled/grilled 175
    Center Rib Chop, broiled/grilled 185
    Rib Chops 185
    Pork Blade Steak, broiled/grilled 195

    Pork (country-style spareribs, braised), 3 oz. (85.05g)Calories: 251.6


    Today's pork products contain an average of 31% less fat, 29% less saturated fat, 10% less cholesterol and 14% fewer calories compared to those of 10 years ago. Many cuts stack up to the nutritional profile of poultry. In fact, a 3-ounce serving of a skinless chicken thigh contains more fat and saturated fat than a comparable serving of trimmed pork tenderloin or boneless pork sirloin chop.
    The pork today is leaner than it used to be, which tends to make it a little bit dry sometimes. For a really juicy pork chop, try visiting countries where they are still raising pigs the same way they used to. Or not. If you like juicy pork, roast your tenderloin in apple juice. Yummy.
     
  8. seoulnewfie

    seoulnewfie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Messages:
    303
    Likes Received:
    0
    I ate about one serving of tenderloin pork a week while cutting and maintaining. It did not make a big difference for me. But be warned, what worked for me may not work for you.
     
  9. troyounces

    troyounces Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you want to keep the pork moist, cook it at lower temperatures for a longer time.

    I usually barbecue pork tenderloin on high for about 5 minutes a side, lower the temperature to 'low', close the lid and let it cook until it the internal temperature reaches 165F. Let is sit for 5 minutes before eating.

    I also enjoy cooking pork in a slow cooker during the winter months. Stick it in, turn it on in the morning, and it's done by the time you come home from work.
     
  10. Robert2006

    Robert2006 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,695
    Likes Received:
    0
    I do pork to 135F by the time it sits a bit the temp will be 140F at most I'll push it to 145F.

    Live a little. Tric what it is called is a small price to pay :lol:
     

Share This Page