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What does each sport teach us moral virtues or affect our personal traits?

Discussion in 'Introductions & Advice For Beginners' started by autumngirl, Aug 6, 2016.

  1. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
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    OK this topic I am interested in. Out side the box of physical activity is actually recommended for 150 minutes for all human beings and that physical activity can reduce stress, etc. Do you think each sports, with its features (large group, small group, solo, physical movements, etc) can actually teach us certain personal traits or moral virtues?

    How sports can impact our personal traits or teach us moral virtues:
    • Walking / Fast Walking
    • Jogging / Running
    • Weight Lifting
    • Football / Basketball / Volleyball, etc. (large group)
    • Tennis, etc (solo)
    • Martial Arts
    What do you think? I prefer that you share your personal experience.

    For myself, I have found weight training to teach me a lot about concentration and balance, so it is mentally challenging for me especially that you need to change your workout movements / exercises regularly. However, I have found that kick boxing / martial arts in general teaches me patience. Soccer helped me in the past become more strategic or planner but stay alerted and concentrated while volleyball and basketball is more about physical balance and maintain relaxation. Yoga or Gymnastic was the most challenging and I was never able to practice it mainly because it require openness or easy of flow of energy in terms of self expression (which has always been a struggle for me) :)
     
  2. PeteBDawg

    PeteBDawg Well-Known Member

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    Oh, totally! When you study late 18th and 19th century poetry, you learn about the poets who used to go on long walks to contemplate nature. It gets a bit lost that these walks weren't just strolls but tended to be fairly grueling hikes. I think running or hiking for distance can teach you a lot about how to be alone with your thoughts, and about the intersection of thought, sensation and emotion. That's my experience with it, anyway.

    For me, the virtue of weightlifting is about patience - expanding your sense of time frame beyond the immediate moments in front of your face. Even the difference in time frame between a workout and the benefits of it helps offer some window into the scope of time and human existence that can be instructive and strengthen character - both patience and immediacy.

    It is, relatedly, about the difference between what you can influence and what you can't, and how to push your limits and disbelieve the ways you constrain yourself while at the same time not falling entirely out of step with your power -- which can lead to a lot of suffering, if you insist to yourself that you are capable of changing, and thus responsible for, a lot of things out of your control.

    Running is Romantic, weightlifting is Stoic.

    In my experience, basketball has a lot of lessons about status and communication - about feeling strong or weak, and about the difference between truly trying and working outside your comfort zone and merely doing what seems possible without pain - and then how those things can interact with how other people - friends or rivals - relate to you, and how you relate to them. It is hard especially in this day and age to come to an understanding of the virtue of competition, when we are constantly bombarded with outcomes and causes. There is a clarity to basketball in this regard - you can see everything that happens, you can see where luck and skill and strength and grit - violence and fair play, ambition, desire and comradery intersect.

    I coach comedy theater troupes, and my favorite team had a real breakthrough when we started playing pickup basketball together. It really helped us negotiate relationships onstage and create together more effectively - really to strive and find each other's power.

    Hi everybody!
     

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