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Turning over a new leaf

Discussion in 'Fitness Journals' started by Naturegirl, Feb 16, 2008.

  1. kree-kree

    kree-kree Well-Known Member

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    I am a huge fan of cooking a little more and then freezing it for later! So many times we are busy thats its easy to grab a frozen meal of something, defrost, heat and go. It also helps me so I don't cheat or blow the eating plan because I have to cook something when I'm not in the mood.

    I loved all your pretty pictures of FOOD:drool:

    I remember watching Golden Girls with my grandparents:)
     
  2. Jedi

    Jedi Well-Known Member

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    So have you been tracking?

    I love your collage of wholesome foods :) it is so nice, to not have to restrict one macronutriant, but enjoy the spread of great options we have in nature :)
     
  3. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    kree kree - I'm never in the mood to cook :lol: Freezing is great for portion sizes too. I hate using so many little plastic baggies but I plan on washing and reusing them.

    I love Golden Girls - I used to watch it with my Grandma too.

    jedi - We are omnivores :nod:

    Yes I did start to track again and learned some from lessons from that. It was actually kind of hard staying away from all that good food :) Also I started to feel a sense of aversion towards my morning shakes after cutting down on my dinners or snacks. The reason why is that I felt a little deprived but at the same time a shake didnt seem very appetizing. However I couldnt do an intermittent fasting breakfast this time since I was trying to exercise in the morning (new for me) from now on and got a little hypoglycemic if I didnt have a post workout meal. So I had to have something and I am finding that I can do well with a small breakfast of foods instead of a shake and be satisfied until dinner, for cutting anyway :tu: I am definitely a two meal a day person no matter what in any case!




    I found another healthy substitution! I was craving a cinnamon roll the other day, and thought about what I could make that would be healthy to eat instead. Before as I shopped in the store, I would see cinnamon raisin bread and debate about that (can rarely find organic raisin bread let alone sprouted) but it had lots of carbs anyway because of the raisins. So anyway I got a piece of sprouted grain bread from the freezer and toasted it, put the grass fed butter on it, and sprinkled it with cinnamon and a teaspoon of sugar. The sugar was not healthy but everything else was and it was only a teaspoon anyway. I was so proud of myself :D

    I've been having trouble sleeping though despite cutting out coffee :confused: My dreams are still scary as ever and leave me tossing and turning. Last night I dreamed that a polar bear broke into my cabin and was trying to eat me for dinner. I dont know where the hell my shotgun was at the time but I probably wouldnt have been able to fire it seeing as how I cant drive or swim in my dreams.


    We had some thunder today! :spaz: That was fun.
    A cool front moved in after this week of heat and you could smell the ocean in the air this morning.
     
    #323 Naturegirl, Jul 3, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2009
  4. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear about your mom .


    :nono: good excuses for the insomniac...although GG is no a personal fave

    :spaz: we did too but it didn't smell like ocean. It just smelled like dirt...I live in the desert.
     
  5. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    Nowhereman - Thanks - it is tough for everyone dealing with family issues :)

    I know, as I was posting the thought occured to me that I should probably try to get to bed before midnight. Although can you blame me for the news - I have stayed away for some time because it made me depressed but now the mainstream is all a-buzz about stuff I was always keenly interested in :spaz: Oh gosh and it's so conflicting and it takes so much time digesting it all and then if you really want to do your homework you have to go to the real sources and all that.

    I very much want to visit the Southwest and smell that ponderosa and see those natural wonders! Did you grow up there?
     
  6. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    Yes I did. Been here since third grade.

    I have periods of watching the news. I feel they regurgitate the same stuff over and over and they focus on meaningless issues, I get tired of it. I don't even bother with the morning crap, GMA and stuff like that. I feel more informed watching Colbert and the Daily Show then other new's shows. It's hard finding unbiased sources of news.
     
  7. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    Nowhereman - I've lived in the Pacific Northwest for most of my life and could see myself living here for the rest of my life, but man do I miss the sun a lot of the time :cry:

    Sometimes they do spend an awful long time on the same story, but maybe they just have to fill airspace until something new comes along.
    Gah, dont even get me started on morning shows - I always had a strong dislike towards them for some strange reason.

    I'm glad Colbert got his own show because he is really funny :lol:
     
  8. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    The sun is overrated.

    Colbert is awesome. I have his quote gadget on my google homepage.
     
  9. Big_D

    Big_D Well-Known Member

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    Colorado is sunny! :cool:
     
  10. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    Nowhereman - As soon as the weather gets above the fifties and the sun breaks through the clouds people whip out their tank tops and sunscreen :p

    Big D - Oh really now :D Maybe I'll have to visit sometime - of course there are a lot more reasons to visit Colorado besides sunshine. Actually my mom lived briefly in Denver and Colorado Springs and I dont know why she moved back up here. I dont think I'd mind the cloudiness here so much if it didnt rain as much as it does. It's more of a constant drizzle and showers. We dont get any rockin' storms.


    School's been on my mind a lot since we started transitioning to the new system at work. I always knew I wouldnt be working there forever and it was nice while it lasted. While we may or may not get laid off (probably though since our duties are getting phased out) it's beside the point. I got lucky with that job as far as untrained entry level positions go. I dont know what I'll find next or what my future will be without an education.

    I'm vacillating between Environmental Science - which is probably a safe bet especially going forward in this day and age, and Horticulture. A Bachelor of Environmental Science involves calculus and while I'm not terrible at math I'm not an expert either. I wonder if all the rumors about calculus are true. The great thing about the ES degree is that I found some schools that offer the courses online (except the first year where you need lab.) That is a huge blessing. It's a big decision no matter how you look at it. Time, money, ongoing commitments. My heart and natural passion for it is definitely there and I know I'd do well, it's just the money and the what ifs.

    Possibly agriculture and animal studies too, although I never plan on owning my own farm or business and I'd rather just do generalized work to help out (would just like to work on a small farm) so probably not needed. I dont think I'd need a degree for a hobby farm either if I ever did get the opportunity. Speaking of, I got my subscription to Hobby Farm yesterday and the cover features heritage hogs. Piglets are cute. I was extremely interested in Permaculture, but there are no accredited institutions here. There are courses and certificates, but people already doing related fields can easily take some courses so they'd be nothing special for an entry level person like myself.

    Well if anything I can get out there and see what's available/network before I decide to go to school, while I'm out on my cross country trip. God I hope I can afford the gas.
     
    #330 Naturegirl, Jul 5, 2008
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2008
  11. Rogozhin

    Rogozhin Active Member

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    NG

    I'm contemplating the return to college for another degree, this time it would be a degree in Renewable Engery. Rather than Horticulture you may want to contemplate a degree in permaculture (lane county offers a program). Enviormental Science would be a great degree (my sister-in-law just finished her MA in Public Policy for Enviormental Sustainability at Evergreen) and she's super excited to visit and work on the property. WSU has a pilot degree for what I want to study. I'm sure you could custom build a degree that would suit your desire within your area. If you want sun you just need to travel east, there's more than you can deal with out here. :D

    It seems like you know what you want to do! Godspeed!

    I took a few pictures of the property, there are some dust devils, but it is what I love out here!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    I don't know if you've been this far east, but it's really amazing if you can get past ellensburg. If this a hijack, just ask to delete the pictures.

    Rogo
     
    #331 Rogozhin, Jul 5, 2008
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2008
  12. Jedi

    Jedi Well-Known Member

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    Cool photos Rogo!

    I would love to go back to school, but the cost, rather than my age, make it prohibitive unless i do years and years of correspondance.... and I like the personal interaction of going to class etc... I wouldn't be sure what to study though... I would hesitate between something language related, nutritional science or something in the renewable energy/ecology field.....I am so glad you are looking into this :) its strange being a guidance counsellor as my students look only at very narrow choices, mainly business and internatioanl relations.
     
  13. Seltzer

    Seltzer Elite Member

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    NG, when are you leaving on your trip? The concept of a cross country trip came up yesterday, but there's no way that my wife and I could take the time off from work to do anything close to it. I'd really like to, though. Enjoy!
     
  14. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    Rogo - Hey! Please feel free to post pictures - I always love seeing them :) You know it's funny but that big boulder in the first picture looks volcanic just sittin' out there all by itself, like it got blown there, but maybe it was formed by erosion. It's nice to see you have a little green splashed across the landscape now that it's summer. Gosh those lakes turn into beautiful little oasis' in such a harsh environment dont they? Are you going to practice any permaculture on your land? There are a couple videos on youtube entitled Greening the Desert - they're way cool.

    I go to the Chicago area to visit family whenever I get the chance and I take the bus so I pass through all those states in between. We've only ever stopped in Spokane, Moses Lake, and Ellensburg, so I havent seen any other cities in that area though. But the next stop is Coeur d'Alene.

    I was thinking about renewable energy too (and congratulations to your sister-in-law for her degree) - but it quickly passed seeing as how I know I dont have the mind of an engineer. I wasnt aware that there were degrees in Permaculture - are you sure - do you have a link? Is that Lane County Oregon? That's where I'm from! :) That whole lot of people down there have been 'green' for as long as I can remember. I know there are a few places to get certified in permaculture now down there (and lots of places in the US) but I'll just tack that on to a college degree since I'd be of no use to prospective employers with just a certification. I'll probably custom build something, as you mentioned.

    Thanks for the well wishes! :)

    Jedi - It is so much money I know :eek: A bachelor's degree gives me panic attacks just thinking about the debt I'd be taking on. It seems like France might be a good place for renewable energy because the Europeans appear to be more of a pioneer in that regard compared to us especially. Business is where the big bucks are so I dont blame your students for wanting to go into that and international study is important since we're so globalized.

    Seltzer - I'm planning on going next year. I'm not sure what the job situation will be like and that'll dictate how long I'll be gone. (I also really want to go to Alaska.) I want to move on from there in terms of work, however if I decide to go to school than I'll hang on for as long as I can for the money. There are a few depending factors and a lot to think about, people to think about :scared:.

    EDIT: Finally found a good source of spicy peanuts - these are going to help me cut. I used to like honey roasted and used them a lot the last time I successfully cut, but I've gone crazy for the spicy ones. Great low carb snack.
     
    #334 Naturegirl, Jul 5, 2008
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2008
  15. Rogozhin

    Rogozhin Active Member

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    NG

    I appologize, the degree I was thinking of at Lane Community College (I lived in Eugene for a few years, what town did you grow up in? It's beautiful down there!) was this one; http://www.lanecc.edu/instadv/catalog/online/documents/energymgmttech.pdf
    It's not a permaculture degree, I was transposing. :(

    I'm glad you like the pictures! That gigantic volcanic rock was dropped by the missoula flood ten thousand years ago as it dissipated after flowing over dryfalls.

    The lakes and the river make this desert beautiful and tenable! Thank you for the youtube recommendation as I'll be using the permaculture method to raise crops on a few of the acres. This is one acre that I'll be starting work upon immediately (Are you familiar with raintree nursery in Olympia? They will be providing both the fruit trees and the windbreak trees.

    [​IMG]

    I've never visited the heart of our country or taken a road trip longer than 1200 miles, what was your favorite state to travel through? I've been able to find roasted wheat kernels locally finally! Where are the spicy peanuts out here? We have none. :( Are they dry roasted spicy peanuts?

    Thank you for the photo compliment Jedi. :)

    Rogo
     
    #335 Rogozhin, Jul 6, 2008
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2008
  16. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    Rogo - Ah I see :nod: Energy Management looks like a good field to get into - no doubt there is a future there.
    It is beautiful, a good combination of dense evergreen forested mountains and fertile valleys good for agriculture. Plus the coast not far away.

    Have you checked out any books from Amazon for permaculture? The best ones - the ones that are comparable to college textbooks, are Introduction to Permaculture by Bill Mollison (one of the pioneers) and Edible Forest Gardens by David Jacke and Eric Toesmeier. My favorite videos on Youtube are done by the video bloggings of the 'peakmoment' crew. They've got over a hundred excellent shows. Personally I am not a peak oil doomer because I anticipate us drilling for more oil in places we didnt want to before and I think we're probably going to advance our technology to be able to process oil shale which is plentiful here. Probably also get into nuclear. It might be a bumpy ride but we need lots of energy and we're going to get it in order to keep us going. I'm not opposed to using oil either - it's been used for thousands of years, it would just be nice if we didnt need so damn much of it to power our population and consumption. There are limits. I was watching old films - and I probably see an automobile the same way people did back then, a way to escape and see new places, it'll be a shame if we lose that. Same thing with lots of other miracles of technology.

    Are you going to be partially off the grid? Another good show on youtube was done by Les Stroud (survivorman) as he tried to build a cabin/house for his family that was entirely off the grid. Information that's harder to find is wilderness survival and that's what I'm trying to learn more of. It doesnt seem like there are any recognized difinitive guides in text format - it's all in person courses. Though there are a few well rated books on amazon. I'm waiting for Les' book to come out :D

    I havent heard of Raintree Nursery. What kind of fruit trees will you have? Are you eventually going to own animals too? It's so cool you are interested in this :spaz: My grandmother and grandfather own about 5 acres and my grandma said I can do whatever I want as long as I dont destroy her land :lol: But I dont know if I'll end up living with her for certain at this point. It would be nice to create my own beautiful paradise though. When I went to a permaculture retreat years ago, we saw a presentation about this man - I believe he was German, who was renowned for his farm in the foothills. I cannot even describe how magnificant it was, it was the most beautiful place I have ever seen - a fairytale with a bavarian twist. Visually it would have integrated well with a little country cottage village but the video footage did not show what the surrounding area looked like.

    It's hard to pick a favorite state since each state has it's own appeal, but the states that I liked driving through would be Idaho (green mountains and a huge lake) Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming (wildlife, mountains, various interesting geologic phenomena) and southern Ohio (green hilly landscape with lots of foliage.) The Pacific Northwest is my favorite area though.

    The peanuts are Frito Lays :o
     
    #336 Naturegirl, Jul 6, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2009
  17. Rogozhin

    Rogozhin Active Member

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    NG

    As a desert boy I enjoyed the visual beauty of the county (Florence and the sand dunes on the beach were amazing). Is Creswell to the east or west of Eugene? I wasn't in a position to procure a job in agriculture or permaculture at the time (and I let the despondancy get to me). The lack of sunlight was a difficult adjustment that I did not handle well.

    I have two books about permaculture, but they're not from amazon. What's very inspiring about some of the farmers I worked for over the years is that they are pursuing 'no till' as a valid way to overcome the horrible commercial mechanism of agriculture (I know it's a small step). When a contemporary american farmer moves into a previously fallow piece of irrigated land (a circle over here) they start with a ripper, then a plow, then a disc. The topsoil lost during this process is astounding and disheartining. With the 20 acres I have to till it's not ever been commercially farmed so I have a decent soil base to work with (I just need to plant some cover crop on the 2 acres closest to the house. I've been looking at youtube mostly for strawbale home building guides (I've worked on two strawbale structures in Ellensburg), but I'll definately look at your suggestions NG, thank you :) !

    I will try to go completely off grid. The house was offgrid up until 2007 (the house was built in 1987). My primary goals are a rainwater collection system off the metal roof and a 2500 gallon tank installed on the structure Roy built above the well (he never finished it). I have a friend that works for a local soil sampling company so I'll be taking a 12' probe out to the property next week and take soil samples on a 20x32' grid across the land. If I can get the original owners off the property (they're still on and paying my monthy mortage) by august I'll be able to start spending roughly two weeks per month on improvements (drip system, windbreak, and half an acre of orchard). My sister-in-law (and brother) have offered to help with the expansion of the property into an eastern washington sustainablility workshop through evergreen (this is also another reason why I'm pursuing and planning another structure on the east slope of the property).

    Apple and walnut trees unless I hear back from the wsu horticulture department (maybe some peach trees). I'm not experienced at all with fruit trees besides apples. :( My impression (I don't agree with you about our ability, as a global culture, to sustain ourselves without cheap hydrocarbon based energy-the eroi ratio becomes nasty quickly) of what your choice seems to be is one of 'perfect opportunity'. I think you should move onto your grandparent 5 acres and learn what you can (you have a contemporary skill set that will always be valuable) and create your paradise (I'm doing it out in the desert)! You're correct about the degree, but if you have 5 acres that you can work NOW you should do it. :tu:

    How are you handling living in Seattle? I lived there as a teenager (lynwood).

    We grew up raising chickens (I'll be building a chicken coop). I'm also contemplating some rabbits and goats (small animals, no cows-not enough irrigated land).

    Were you able to take any pictures of the old german's bavarian village? I'm jealous because I didn't explore much when I was living in Oregon. I've seen Russia and England, and the PNW is also my favorite.

    Please keep me updated about what you decide to do with your potential five acres?

    Here's a picture of the palisades for you;
    [​IMG]

    Rogo
     
    #337 Rogozhin, Jul 10, 2008
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  18. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    Hey Rogo!
    Thank you so much for replying - I'm really enjoying our conversation :)

    Creswell is a little ways south of Eugene on I-5, between Eugene and Cottage Grove. I'm definitely a forest lover as opposed to a desert dweller and when I visit the desert it's a nice change and I love the sun on my skin, but even with the pleasantness of more sunshine I'd have a hard time adjusting. I'd miss being able to hide in the cool lush green mountains I think - although if I lived nearby the mountains I could probably handle that.

    The permaculture retreat was in Leavenworth but the presentation we saw was actually just a video :( If I saw the real thing in person I would have taken a million pictures!

    Strawbale would fit right in with the surrounding lanscape where you're at. People have all sorts of ideas of more ecologically friendly living. Have you seen the miniature 'tumbleweed' houses that are around 100 sq. ft. Someone of my physical stature would probably have an easier time living in one of those than most. :p

    Oh yeah - no till is definitely in the direction of permaculture. Less human intervention and imitating the way the natural ecosystem works and letting nature keep a sustainable cycle going. I'm always surprised at these little 10 or 15 acre farms and how much they can fit in there. Way more bountiful in appearance than monoculture farms. Your 20 acres is going to be quite the lavish spread. :D Rainwater collection is a must out where you are I bet. I wonder if the eastern region of the state has special laws regarding this practice? I know rainwater is considered property of the state and so far there are no permits required for collection but they are considering new laws or changing the law the last I heard. Sounds like you have a lot of projects ahead of you! That's nice of your family to help you out - and maybe the workshopers too. Are you all by yourself otherwise?

    Chickens are sweet - I like their clucking. I would like to maybe have a miniature dairy cow but I've drunk goats milk and it's pretty darn tasty. Rabbits are escape artists. We had a dozen of them at one time when I was growing up once and they managed to bite through their cages and wreak havoc - my mom got rid of them after they ate the neighbors plants and flowers.

    I'm not experienced with anything! Well with real farm experience anyway and I have so much to learn. It's too bad the locale is becoming so developed with restaurants, track housing, and businesses cropping up, but it is in the Chicagoland area so you have to expect it. The house is right on the edge of a protected wetland though so there is just an island of undeveloped land left and you can still see deer and the ocassional fox. They put the house on the market a few years ago and my grandparents are just waiting for the right offer to come in. They dont want to settle because it's such a beautiful place and my grandpa put a lot of work into it (verandah and large pool as well.) But the rooms are still usually rented out. They said if they do move though they'll probably stay in the region but more south and out in the country.

    I should have clarified what I meant earlier when I was talking about oil. First of all I dont look at it in any way politically. I'm only interested in the human nature and human history aspect of it. So no politics (which is a rule at JSF.) I meant to say that basically I am not an extreme doomer in the sense that I think it's not all going to come crashing down at once. I'm of the long emergency way of thinking. There is no denying that this is an unprecedented time in human history and it absolutely astounds me how much changed in only a hundred years. Action is slow in the face of conflicting interests and different points of view (oil, climate change, overpopulation, etc) and evidence will only result in action when it culminates in tangible reality. We like our modern mode of life and dont want to give it up easily. I think modern society is unsustainable, but we'll probably hang on for a while until we're forced to make radical changes. You know what has been so remarkable is that it's only been in the last few years that the whole issue has exploded into the spotlight. There's always been that small group of voices, but now it's everywhere and everyone is talking about it. So perhaps we'll really start taking action on some of these concerns, but it remains to be seen how it all turns out. I myself would like to live differently and that's what I want to move towards, but what others do is not in my hands.

    My favorite places to live were the medium sized cities. The small ones get really lonely and isolated if you dont have a car. I've grown accustomed to the way I've been living and gotten spoiled and it's been hard giving it all up (along with the people.) :o I love watching Antiques Roadshow and thinking about how we used to live and how at the time we probably considered ourselves rather advanced. (The one strong desire in me pushing me to change is self reliance - which can also be a great exercise in ingenuity, something that's very gratifying. And I'm not necessarily all about chucking it all and living like our ancestors, I just wish humans could find some kind of balance.)

    Maybe kind of like Minik, but in a less extreme way.



    Minik Wallace (ca. 1890 – October 29, 1918) was an Inuit who was brought to the United States of America from Greenland along with five other Inuit in 1897 by explorer Robert Peary. The adult Inuit soon all became ill with tuberculosis, to which they had little or no resistance, and three adults and one child died. (Another young adult, the sixth member of the group, survived and was sent back to Greenland). One of the first to die was Minik's father, Qisuk, and the boy was inconsolable with grief. Peary and his camp eventually made the arrangements for Minik to be returned to Greenland. Minik had forgotten his language and much of his culture, and his life in Greenland was fraught with new difficulties. His people took him back, and taught him the skills he needed to know; he even became a fine hunter. He also acted as a guide and translator for visitors, playing a key role in the otherwise misguided Crocker Land Expedition of 1913. This latest acquaintance with American visitors proved another turning point; Minik resolved to return to the United States, and did so in 1916. On his return to the US, Minik worked at a series of miscellaneous jobs; eventually he found work in a lumber camp in North Stratford, New Hampshire. His employer, Afton Hall, took him under his wing and invited him to live with his family. Minik, along with many of Hall's family and workers, succumbed to the terrible influenza outbreak of 1918, dying despite the best medical attentions on 29 October 1918. Minik is buried in the Indian Stream cemetery in Pittsburg, New Hampshire.
     
    #338 Naturegirl, Jul 10, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2009
  19. Rogozhin

    Rogozhin Active Member

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    You're very welcome NG!

    Ahh, I never traveled south of Eugene in my years there, that's why I didn't recognize Creswell!

    - I am enjoying it too (I don't have much of a chance to talk about this topic with other people (my brother and sister-in-law live in Olympia and they're really the only ones I can talk to about this-besides my father). I enjoy camping and hiking in the forests north of lake wenatchee and salmon la sac, but I never truly feel comfortable. I suspect though that it is because I've just not spent enough time in the forest. :shrug: We really are made to adapt to our environment so maybe my silly stubbornness about dwelling in the desert would melt away after a few decades in the forest! :D

    I haven't tried to find any permaculture classes/retreats in the area, but considering my lack of any permaculture farming experience it would be really beneficial (if you know of any coming up, even in the leavenworth area please let me know). I have experience within the commercial farming industry so I do know what I don't want to do with the land. :) It is heartening to see even a little movement toward permaculture out here in the columbia basin considering that I've seen how badly the ag industry treats the land from which they make their vast amounts of revenue (I tend to get a little hot when I start discussing it) :mad: !

    My experience with strawbale building (a few years ago, but it made a strong impact on me) was really lucky and I'm itching to build a structure of my own! I've never stumbled across those little tumbleweed houses, but I've wondered about the native american's that lived out here and what they used for dwellings. You're rights that it suits the landscape here beautifully! People are also building straw bale structures in heavy forest throughout washington and oregon (if they are built correctly they're just as waterproof as a regular stick built home). The two structures I worked on are located in Ellensburg and at the time I was a coffee roaster doing side jobs in construction and timothy hay farming (a really crazy and fun time for me!). The beauty of Ellensburg is that it is close to the mountains, yet it's still open and has that 'big sky' appeal (you would probably like it since you'd still have some not quite so lush forest only thirty miles away). :)

    I had actually read about the rainwater collection laws regarding another state, but I haven't read up on washington state water harvesting laws, thanks for the 'nudge'! I have a list that grows everyday for what I have planned and need to start working on immediately; I am by myself in this effort (outside of family) of eventual hybrid sustainability (I realized that it's not tenable to be completely sustainable, and I don't plan on becoming an anchorite!) :D

    I'm trying to only buy food once a month (I need to learn how to can as soon as I get the gardens planted and producing even a little crop) and this will help me with my goals of becoming leaner and more fit. Being that I cook for myself I keep things very simple, yet somewhat tasty. :) I'm buying in bulk and trying to build up a decent amount of surplus since food costs will continue to rise.

    I've never drunk goats milk, but goat cheese is very tasty. ;) Our chickens escaped often, but not our rabbits! I have found interesting reading in a few pamphlets from the depression era when the government released guides for home gardening and how many acres it would take to support a family. As I recall they recommended 40 acres of arable land to support a family of 4, but there are so many variables that even a rough estimate like that isn't really much of a guide, though it does make clear that only 75 years ago people had to adapt and embrace skills and hard work that today would be considered almost 'barbaric' by a majority of our population unfortunately. I'm not a hardcore doomer either, I just want to be more 'self-reliant' (as you put it). :)

    I have family in Seattle still so I go over every few moths for visits and it seems to be more congested and harder to get around each time I travel there. I think though that if you lived in a neighborhood that was close to where you worked (so you didn't have to drive) or there was a bus route that was easily available then it would be much more tolerable. My grandmother lives in edmonds and that would be a nice place (though as you pointed out about your grandparents acreage in the chicagoland area) except that the 'empty' land is being developed and is much too expensive to purchase. :( You have the option of '5 acres and independence'! :D



    Thank you for the little story about Minik and the discussion!

    Rogo




     
    #339 Rogozhin, Jul 13, 2008
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2008
  20. Naturegirl

    Naturegirl Well-Known Member

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    Rogo-

    Here is a picture of the tumbleweed houses, the name is actually the name of the company that sells them. Basically they're just miniature houses!

    We worked for a few hours on something that might have been a strawbale or cob structure when I went to the permaculture retreat several years ago. I remember packing mud and straw together and making bricks out of them and then packing them onto a frame or foundation. It was a long time ago and I didnt take any notes on that particular project - maybe because my hands were so dirty.

    . Are they really starting to move in that direction now? That'd be nice to have that community resource especially when you're first starting out. That is something I have felt the pull of more and more - that desire to be part of community. Ellensburg is pretty cool because you can see the mountains in the distance. Wow is it windy though! Every single time I've stopped I've gotten nearly blown over by the wind - must be some kind of tunneling action going on.

    I had to look up anchorite. I thought it might be tied to being a luddite but not so much. You could live totally off the grid but that depends on how you want to live :lol: Dick Proenneke survived all alone for 30 years in Alaska in his self built cabin with just a wood stove and fireplace, but not everyone wants to rough it quite like that! Did you ever see any of the shows on PBS: Frontier House, 1900 House, Colonial House? Recently they had the Alaska Experiment on the Discovery Channel. Those were some of my favorite shows ever.

    I'd need electricity because I dont know if I could live without the internet and it's informational value (the computer itself is a whole 'nother issue). A hot shower every once in a while would be really nice too. Other than that I could do without just about anything else. I do like taking pictures though and music is essential to the spirit. The only thing that scares me is medical care. I've been looking at books on Amazon for food preservation and storage - they have a lot :tu: My list is getting so long. Wilderness survival, permaculture, food preparation, horticulture, livestock raising and bee keeping, traditional crafts, natural medicine, shelter building (I have my heart set on a cabin for the aesthetics.)

    I'd like to do more reading about the Depression too, it would be insightful. It's a whole different story now. Aside from our techno culture change, the most striking are changes in energy (resources) and population. I've been reading as much as I can (some info's been out there for a while) and keeping with breaking news and it's all very daunting and foreboding and becoming moreso by the hour. The breadth of this is astonishing and I'm doing my best with my non-engineer minded brain to figure out the logistics regarding that stuff aside from everything else you have to know. Just like with nutrition - there are a lot of experts out there with all kinds of research, though they at least seem to agree on one thing at this time.

    You know what's funny is I was looking at the more populated cities in the world and Seattle is tiny by comparison. I cannot fathom living in a city with millions of people. Edmonds is actually quite pleasant, but you're right, it will most likely become much more populous.
     
    #340 Naturegirl, Jul 16, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2009

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