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Trance-like while exercise and aggression afterward

Discussion in 'Introductions & Advice For Beginners' started by autumngirl, Aug 7, 2015.

  1. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
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    It usually happens in summer but never the less in winter too.

    I sometimes enter a trance-like state of mind of being "over worked mentally" while working out.

    It becomes too stressful that I have visuals-like experience like I would space out and do not hear or see at all and afterward I feel very angry or aggressive after my workouts. Now, I tend to feel the same peak of aggression in early morning, so I started to talk long walks.

    I do not use much really other than multivitamins, acidophiles, etc. I do not consume any protein whey, but I sometimes use l-tryptophan at night to make me sleep and some green products when I could drink it.
     
  2. Jaer

    Jaer Well-Known Member

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    Apparently it has been a while since I visited the upstairs. All I seem to do is read journals anymore.

    I have the exact opposite of what you describe: Although I find working can be trance-like and meditative, it makes me feel serene.

    Meditation is using a sharp focusing of the mind, often directed toward a single point, such as focusing on the breathing or on the tip of the nose. By holding focus on a single point, you quiet the internal voice; it is lost in the focus.

    Working out can be similar: quiet the internal voice and focus on the weight. On the set. On the reps. Same when running, focus on the step, the pace, the feel. Quiet the mind, push everything else out, and work.

    It seems you don't get that. If your trance-like state is a feeling of being mentally over-worked, then maybe your workout plan is too complex/complicated for you. It requires a lot of your mental energy to see it through.

    Do you enjoy working out?

    I ask because my wife doesn't like working out/lifting. She will force herself to do it (I have a gym in the basement, so it is pretty convenient even when time is tight), but only if I am with her to play Personal Instructor. She had no desire to research, learn, create, or execute a plan for herself, but she'll ask "Can we lift?" and then she'll do what I tell her to do. I need to make the workouts short (under 20 minutes is the goal) and just a few lifts (usually 3-4 different exercises). Too much more, and she just doesn't have the mental fortitude to continue with it.

    Oddly, she has "enjoyed" the super intense, ass-kicking Evil 8 Complexes workout--it's over pretty quick, and even though it is a series of 8 moves, they are done all at once with the same weight, so there is no stopping to change plates or any of that (she really hates changing plates, which makes doing a full workout together at the same time difficult in the small basement gym).

    She likes yoga and likes walks, bike rides, and sometimes running. But lifting is tough for her because it is stressful, not relaxing, draining, and just a mental hurdle. If I'm not there to take as much thinking out of the process (she doesn't even know how much weight she lifts--I track everything and make determinations on what to put on the bar), she won't do it.

    If you can identify with that, then my recommendation is to try to find something you enjoy (like my wife with yoga--she tries to go 2-3 times per week) or at least get a personal trainer to remove the mental workload.

    Jaer
    hopes some of this helps!
     
  3. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
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    Thank you for your respond. My life is somehow mentally and intellectually demanding, my only concern I am unable to lift more than 6-8 months out of a full 12 months year although I am truly committed to working out and do enjoy weight training specifically. It does produce serenity most of the time = I do not see yoga as my thing, swimming is somehow good, etc. I have some future plans to try either yoga to kick boxing when my life schedule slow down.

    I think my brain find certain things challenging such as free weights workouts (controlled movement), walking outside (variable temperature, change in elevations, etc) which are probably extra challenging compared to my work outs are now at the gym (controlled temperature area) and using machines. I feel and could wrong that it becomes a strenuous workout due to many variable that somehow engage my mind in a sense I do feel mentally exhausted. My assessment could be wrong.
     
    #3 autumngirl, Sep 16, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2015
  4. Jaer

    Jaer Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you might have a handle on which types of exercise are the mental stressors. Most people might advocate the superiority of free weights over machines, but if the free weights are mentally draining and machines are not, machines are definitely the way to go.

    Jaer
    no longer belongs to a gym, nor does his wife, but she always prefered the machines as well. Though for her, it was more the "social" element.She felt out of place and self conscious in the free weight area, like she wasn't strong enough or fit enough for those, and thus she should remain "in her place" at the machines.
     
  5. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
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    I still use the free weight on occasion, they were my only form of exercise to gain weight for years.

    Thanks Jaer.
     

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