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The HUGE Role of Genetics

Discussion in 'General Health/Fitness & Injuries' started by Vaughan Starr, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. Vaughan Starr

    Vaughan Starr Member

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    Take a look at the following pics of Olympic Athletes and others across a range of disciplines. All are top tier performers. Some, are genetically similar. Some, very dissimilar. All too often when we talk of training I think we fall into the trap of a + b = c. Where 'a' is certain kind of exercise regimen. 'b' is certain kind of dietary regimen. And when you put those together, you get 'c'. Each and every time, you get c. The trouble is, that you don't! Some people, those genetically predisposed to do so, will get the desired 'c' body. But those who aren't genetically put together this way, won't. This is not to say that they won't dramatically improve their strength, health etc. But they may end up looking quite different to the cherry picked examples of those whose genetics have seen them respond optimally to a set regimen.

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    These obvious examples are why I have little time for those who state a certain way to eat, or a certain way to exercise is THE WAY. Just looking at the range of human forms on display here, you can see that there is obviously no such thing. Would some of these elite performers look like their athletic brethren if they adopted the same diet and exercise regimen? Obviously it would depend upon how genetically alike they are. Those very different from one another, could not hope to look like the other (at least naturally), no matter what they did.

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    More pics here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2502477/Can-guess-sport-shape-Olympians-body.html
     
    #1 Vaughan Starr, Nov 12, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
  2. guava

    guava Elite Member
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    I do think that genetics can play a big part in how you look, and, indeed, they can dictate whether or not you have the right build for certain Olympic sports.

    If genetics give you a figure like that horse racer, I agree it's pretty unlikely that you could be a sumo wrestler or a basketball player.

    However, there is a wide range of possible physiques within each of these sports, as there is a wide range of possible physiques within each person's genetic makeup. Just to see a contrast, take a look at the female weight lifter. She looks like a bit of an outlier to me. (I don't follow the sport, so I couldn't say for sure, but I would guess that she could perform as well or better if she had a bigger body mass, or different distribution of fat.) Also if you take a look at any of the tranformation spotlights on these forums and predict which sport that person is best suited to based on their "before" pics and again based on their "after" pics, you'd get a widely different answer. It would be fun to do this with John's progress photos. He looks very much like a cyclist now, but in the past, he's looked like a body builder, weight lifter, and in between, some of the other athletes pictured above. What looks like "genetics" might just be the body that a person has developed because of what a person has been passionate about and devoting a lot of time to.
     
  3. HevyMetal

    HevyMetal Well-Known Member

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    I think two major things about genetics are:-

    bone size
    and muscle tie-in points.

    especially muscle tie-in points.

    A bodybuilder or lifter with long-belly muscles is genetically ahead of a person with short -belly muscles.....

    and the short-belly muscle person can work out until hell freezes over and they will never ever ever look as good as the long-belly muscle person.

    also bone size and structure determines how you basically look to quite an extent....and if you look a little "off" somehow.....there isn't anything you can do about it..........


    Then there's the genetic distribution of strength.

    Some people are born wimps....others are born strong as hell.

    The stronger person is usually ahead of the game when it comes to bodybuilding....
     

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