1. Have you installed the new JSF Mobile app? Check out all the details here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. One account & one avatar for all of JSF. Unified login and profile. Forum alerts on the main site, and more. Check out the details here: Forum & main site unified account feature is live!
    Dismiss Notice

Study: Chocolate Milk Best Post-Workout Drink

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by JC, Jun 28, 2011.

  1. JC

    JC Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
  2. Vorschtuff

    Vorschtuff Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2011
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    They compared it to to sports drinks and calorie free drinks, and so the improved recovery is no surprise. Low-fat chocolate milk, compared to either of those, offers more calories in general, and it's comprised of not just sugar and salt like sports drinks. It has fat, protein, and carbs, and it makes sense to me that a more nutritionally complete drink would benefit the drinker moreso than a sports drink or water.

    I would like to know why they chose chocolate milk, and I'd like to see how chocolate milk compares to a protein shake, to regular milk, and various other drinks that also contain protein, carbs, and fat.
     
  3. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    Messages:
    4,018
    Likes Received:
    11
  4. MMacG78

    MMacG78 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's a great read from Alan. I love any reason that keeps me from spending a ridiculous amount of money on whey protein.
     
  5. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    5,178
    Likes Received:
    21
    Whey protein is a very, very important supplement. In fact, Alan and I view whey protein more as a food source. We both get about 55% of our daily protein requirements from whey. I'm more like 60%. As an example, if your protein needs are 225 grams per day, it's going to be very difficult to get all this protein from whole foods (meat, eggs, cheese, milk, Cottage cheese, etc.)

    Further, whey is very cheap when compared to other protein sources, and is much more convenient and portable.
     
  6. FatLenny

    FatLenny Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'd have to agree. I top out at about 200-220 grams of protein from whole foods, and since I am looking for closer to 250-300 grams, I ended up grabbing some whet. It really make planning easier. I still check the labels before purchasing, though.

    Not all protein powders are created equal. ;)
     
  7. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    5,178
    Likes Received:
    21
    Unfortunately labels won't tell you the real deal, especially if you see "proprietary blend" listed on the label. This means that you might have the ingredients listed, but the actual amounts are not regulated meaning that the amounts might be less than listed. Or an inferior source takes precedence. There are many good, reputable companies out there, and some that actually exceed label claims, but there are as many, if not more, rip off companies. Especially when marketing and promoting their powders are involved. Perfect case in point, the Aragon/Biotest controversy. Aragon is not sponsored or affiliated with any company so his viewpoints combined with his research I find 100% valid and ethical.
     
  8. MMacG78

    MMacG78 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    I can definitely see how whey can be a good source of protein but what do you mix it with? I heard a long time ago (and have ZERO scientific evidence to back this up) that whey is used very quickly by your body and whatever the body can not use is lost through urine. I don't want to be flushing away my protein source
     
  9. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    5,178
    Likes Received:
    21
    This applies only to excess protein. No matter what the source. Once you go over your alloted daily protein intake, the rest is converted to ammonia and excreted as waste, OR stored as fat. Protein has no extra storage capacities as do carbs. Carbs have multiple storage sites, ie: the liver, blood, muscles, etc.
     
  10. Vorschtuff

    Vorschtuff Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2011
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hm. What is/are the decided factor(s) when it comes to what the protein is converted to? I eat less than 200g of protein a day and so I'm not really worried about going over my alloted daily protein intake (it's barely more than 1g per pound of body weight, and it's only 40% of my daily intake) and having it converted to either ammonia or fat, but if I were to go over would there be a way to help influence my body as to what to do with it? I know ammonia is a byproduct of your body metabolizing protein, is it only stored as fat if you're eating a caloric surplus?

    Also, is there a maximum amount of protein your body can handle at once, eg any more than 100g in one meal will cause your body to either excrete the protein or convert it to fat? Or is it more of your total intake over the course of a day?
     
  11. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    5,178
    Likes Received:
    21
    If the human body operated this way, mankind would've become extinct, as a species, many eons ago.

    Training also has a lot to do with how much protein can be assimilated, both pre and post workout, and how much you take in by day's end. We have a young guy here, Pete, who is repping out with 600 lbs. on deadlifts. This guy eats a lot and utilizes every calorie taken in due to his incredible training intensity. Let's say someone else who shares Pete's stats is only able to deadlift 135 pounds for 10 reps, and the rest of his lifts are about 80% less than what Pete can do. Well if he tried to take in as much calories and protein as Pete, you can bet a lot of that will go into his fat stores because he is not causing the same muscle trauma Pete is inducing.
     
  12. Vorschtuff

    Vorschtuff Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2011
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's what I've always thought as far as protein intake, but there's so much bad info out there it's hard to tell sometimes what's true and what isn't. It's never made sense to me, I'm glad to hear that's because it actually doesn't. Thanks for the clarification!
     
  13. bk9824

    bk9824 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2010
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mastover -

    When I utilized your services for training program/diet you recommended I try to steer clear of milk/dairy products. The reasoning you provided was that some people maintain hidden allergies to the food group, and it can aid in the storing of interstitial fat.

    Not trying to call you out, just a question - is the consumption of milk post workout typically better for folks who are bulking rather than cutting or maintaining? Is there any difference?

    You have always maintained that what you eat is less important than hitting your macros daily, so in theory drinking some milk/choc. milk wouldn't be too detrimental so long as it fit within the macros.

    If trying to hit macros at the end of the day, does it make sense to add a scoop of Nitrean Choc or Vanilla to a glass of milk post workout?

    Sorry again, definitely not trying to cause controversy - just looking for a way to incorporate some milk as I have a sweet tooth & choc. milk or milk w/choc Nitrean would help satisfy the cravings.
     
  14. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    5,178
    Likes Received:
    21
    That's fine. Personally not a fan of milk. But if it doesn't hinder progress (no matter what the goal) you can use it however you wish as long as progress towards your goals are improving and that you meet your macro's by day's end.
     
  15. jmike

    jmike Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    0
    what are daily macro's ?

    not to go off on a tangent - but i was reading and this popped out at me and i don't quite understand it
     
  16. Zilla

    Zilla Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Messages:
    881
    Likes Received:
    3

    All daily macro's means is that a person hits their calories ( macros) for the day. So if a person was following a 40/40/20 diet, they would have to get in their 40% protein, 40% carbs and 20% fats for the day.
     

Share This Page