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Squat, deadlift and bench guidelines

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by KT Monahan, Oct 20, 2009.

  1. KT Monahan

    KT Monahan Active Member

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    I often hear than a strength training male should be able to obtain the following after a period of consistant training:

    Bench: Your bodyweight.
    Squat: 1.5 times your bodyweight.
    Deadlift: twice your bodyweight.

    Is that supposed to be at just 1 rep?
     
  2. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    For adult men to be considered strong, 1 RM is suppose to be more like:

    Bench and row: 1.5 x BW
    Squat: 2xBW
    Dead: 2.5xBW
     
  3. NCNBilly

    NCNBilly Well-Known Member

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    Wow, I really need to lose weight. :lol:
     
  4. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

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    I agree ... those are pretty good benchmarks to shoot for IMO.
     
  5. boots

    boots Well-Known Member

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  6. dejavued

    dejavued Senior Member

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    :confused: where'd u get the number of years from?? 5?? and i don't know how that is "in other words" from the first statement.

    btw boots i recently saw the pic of ur wife..... in the over 35 thread....i think. wow!!! i have a new idol. she looks phenomenal! :bow::bow:
     
  7. boots

    boots Well-Known Member

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    Grammar nazi. The inneffective modifying statement lowers my grade to a B-.

    The number of years needed is from personal experience, i.e, it took me five years of consistent and intense 5-6 days a week training to reach those strength markers. That and (I think) I read it in a recent interview with Jim Wendler or Dave Tate.

    Do you have a different take or were you simply busting my grammatical chops?

    Thanks for the compliment about my better half. Believe it or not, she was 35 pounds overweight, when she started 8 years ago! She competed last weekend and brought home the hardware in Figure Masters and Figure Open. Not bad for 43! I should post a pic in that thread.

     
  8. dejavued

    dejavued Senior Member

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    :lol: actually i didn't really mean grammar.... more i just didn't understand how those thoughts related. no worries.

    and nope....i don't have any take..... i was just wondering where you got that number. obviously it would depend on a BUNCH of factors...... but i would of guessed 3 years would be plenty of time with serious training and good nutrition and decently low bodyfat.

    congrats to her!!!

    definitely post up some pics. :nod:
     
  9. fishtanker

    fishtanker Active Member

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    IDK Deja, i've been at this 3 years now, progressing, and never having more than 1 week off but i have yet to reach those numbers. However, in a year or 2 i'll definitely be there.
     
  10. dejavued

    dejavued Senior Member

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    true. but ur a giant. :p
     
  11. boots

    boots Well-Known Member

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    Even on the internet

    Bench and row: 1.5 x BW
    Squat: 2 x BW
    Dead: 2.5 x BW

    is very strong. I don't know many folks that can do it. If you can hit these numbers with full range of motion, you are (in my opinion) a fairly advanced and hard core lifter or genetically blessed. I've never met the latter.

    This is an interesting topic. I'm wondering how long it took folks like Zen to get there. I also wonder, if the gains come that much faster in relation to a younger age and higher hormone levels.

    Deja, I'll post up a competition pic, when we get the CD.
     
  12. George

    George Senior Member

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    :nod:

    There's definitely a disadvantage for those who are taller and have bigger bone structures. On the plus side, when you get there, you'll be moving some ridiculous weight. :spaz: Much more impressive than some dude with those ratios at 160, IMO.
     
  13. KT Monahan

    KT Monahan Active Member

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    But, again, these standards are for your 1RM, right?
     
  14. George

    George Senior Member

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    Yup.
     
  15. gravityhomer

    gravityhomer Elite Member
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    I've never been anywhere near these numbers. Zen, you said for an adult man to be strong, and boots, you said to be considered between advanced and elite.

    These seem pretty different to me.

    I always thought of pullups as the ultimate strength to weight ratio judge. But they deal with reps not max weight. Of course it doesn't really matter, but I think perceptions are interesting.
     
  16. boots

    boots Well-Known Member

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    Looks like everyone is correct -

    I'm looking at as "a one rep maximum is the test to determine maximum muscular strength." As opposed to muscular endurance doing maximum reps. Gravityhomer, you are right, this is interesting.

    From Wikipedia-

    An individual's physical strength is determined by two factors; the cross-sectional area of muscle fibers recruited to generate force and the intensity of the recruitment. Individuals with a high proportion of type I slow twitch muscle fibers will be relatively weaker than a similar individual with a high proportion of type II fast twitch fibers, but would have a greater inherent capacity for physical endurance. The genetic inheritance of muscle fiber type sets the outermost boundaries of physical strength possible (barring the use of enhancing agents such as testosterone), though the unique position within this envelope is determined by training. Individual muscle fiber ratios can be determined through a muscle biopsy. Other considerations are the ability to recruit muscle fibers for a particular activity, joint angles, and the length of each limb. For a given cross-section, shorter limbs are able to lift more weight. The ability to gain muscle also varies person to person, based mainly upon genes dictating the amounts of hormones secreted, but also on sex, age, health of the person, and adequate nutrients in the diet. A one rep maximum is the test to determine maximum muscular strength.

     
  17. guava

    guava Elite Member
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    These are the strength standards from exrx:
    http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/StrengthStandards.htm

    "The standards (not norms) presented in the tables represent a 1RM performance (in pounds) that can be reasonably expected of an adult athlete at various levels of training advancement using standard full range-of-motion barbell exercises with no supportive wraps or suits."

    See training levels below.

    As a man, bench pressing body weight would put you between novice and intermediate, according to exrx. As a woman, it's considered just above advanced. They would consider bench pressing 1.5 X BW to be approximately advanced.

    Squatting 1.5 X BW is approximately is approximately in the intermediate category, and two times body weight advanced. (For women body weight, and 1.5 times BW respectively)

    Deadlift twice body weight is categorized between intermediate and advanced, and two and a half times body weight between advanced and elite.

    Levels of Training:

    Novice - A person training regularly for a period of 3-9 months. This strength level supports the demands of vigorous recreational activities.

    Intermediate - A person who has engaged in regular training for up to two years. The intermediate level indicates some degree of specialization in the exercises and a high level of performance at the recreational level.

    Advanced - An individual with multi-year training experience with definite goals in the higher levels of competitive athletics.

    Elite - Refers specifically to athletes competing in strength sports. Less than 1% of the weight training population will attain this level.


    Typically, then, according to Exrx, the levels quoted in the original post could be expected to be obtained as a one rep max within about two years of training.

    I haven't ever come anywhere near any of those numbers, though I'm not sure you could say that I've been consistently specifically trying to increase my strength either, so that could be a big reason why.

    However, I'm not as embarrassed about my pull-up skills, and I don't think I've really practiced them any more than any other exercise, so I'm not sure that one is any better a measure than any other, though I think they likely measure a different type of strength.

    I think it's probably the case that if you're satisfied with your body weight, it might take less time to meet those numbers, because it's easier to specifically target your workouts for strength goals, without worrying about the sacrifice you could be making with a calorie deficit and other such elements.
     
    #17 guava, Oct 21, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2009
  18. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    I'm not there yet. Best so far:

    Bench/row : 1.34
    Squat: 2.05
    Dead: 2.44

    Check out my brother the powerlifter's old numbers:

    Bench: 1.86
    Squat: 2.84
    Dead: 3.34

    A: He was light (got these in competition at 148# bw).
    B: Yes, real powerlifters are very strong.
     
    #18 zenpharaohs, Oct 21, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2009
  19. tensdanny

    tensdanny Well-Known Member

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    I would think Pete is probably pretty close.

    Zen, I've very surprised by your numbers. I would have thought you had it. You must weigh more than I imagined in my head.

    For my ideal weight:

    DL: 450
    Squat: 360
    Bench: 270

    I would think I'll get these in a reasonable amount of time. Within two years certainly, unless A) this cut takes way longer than I would like or B) I get seriously injured
     
  20. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    You can be in decent shape and not have those numbers. Only people that work for it will likely get them (other than genetic gifts). But the numbers I gave are not even close to competitive for power lifters or elite strength athletes. So they are strong for sure, but not unusually strong.

    Just for comparison, here are the USAPL records for the 148 pound class (open men):

    Bench: 3.20xBW (473.75#)
    Squat: 4.88xBW (722#)
    Deadlift: 4.51xBW (666.75#)
     

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