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Some trainers are funny

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by zenpharaohs, Jul 12, 2005.

  1. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    I had a good workout today. One interesting turn was my trainer decided on pushups. OK I'm wearing 25 pounds of vest, and he turns over a bosu, so I'm already worried. He gets a body bar and tells me to do the pushups by pressing the body bar onto the bosu. I did seventeen. So he says "now do them wide as your hands will go". Never having tried that I didn't know what that was going to be like. Not all that good as it turns out. So I did a sets thirteen and sixteen. He says "that's pretty elite in my book". He doesn't usually say stuff like that.

    So he turns the bosu over and tells me to sit on it, pull my knees up, and when I do he hands me a medicine ball and says "side to side". By which he means oblique twists (as in this web site http://www.sissel-online.com/exercise/oblique_twists_sitfit_medicine_ball.php) except with feet off the floor. I couldn't really do any at all because of the weight vest. It was like just writhing around trying to stay on the bosu ball. Every time I moved the ball to either side the weight vest just toppled me over.

    He's just looking at me with the straightest possible face, but it had to be pretty funny.
     
  2. tennisball

    tennisball Well-Known Member

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    Some trainers are just stupid...




     
  3. RTE

    RTE Well-Known Member

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    Were you paying him money to do that? :confused:
     
  4. Kino

    Kino Well-Known Member

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    Good trainer! Sounds to me like you keyed in on the fact that you've got some stability and balance weakness to work on. Think of it this way...if it was a test...you failed. It may have seemed to you that your trainer had no idea what he was doing. He was most likely trying to help you develop some basic core stabilization and strength. (or at least make an initial assessment)
    "The central nervous system only allows the prime movers to be recruited to the degree that the joint can be stabilized."
    If you can drill this statement into your head, understand it, and incorporate it into your training...all of your lifts will go up. Just try to think of your spine as one long stack of joints that support everything that you do.
    It's like the hub on a wheel...It doesn't matter how strong the rim and the spokes of the wheel are, it the hub can't hold them in place. Or...what's the point of being able to squat 400lbs, if you can't keep your body balanced enough to walk?
    If you're concerned that you don't feel that you're getting what you paid for...ask for ways to perform these exercises on the days that you don't meet with your trainer.
    Next time you have a question about why you're doing something, why not just ask the trainer?
     
    #4 Kino, Jul 12, 2005
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2005
  5. bradh

    bradh Well-Known Member

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    He never really knocked the trainer he just said it was funny that the trainer never had a grin/laugh when he repeatly fell to the floor :lol:
     
  6. tennisball

    tennisball Well-Known Member

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    The point is that you *can* squat 400lbs. And since most people here are concerned with hypertrophy, probably a good set of tree trunks as well. Find me a guy who can squat 4 plates each side who doesn't have amazing core stability and strength (and I'm sure never fussed with weighted vested core stability exercises). He probably just squatted a hell of a lot, and gained core strength that way. Don't say that squatting doesn't recruit enough core muscles or tax the CNS enough.

    I'm still back with my original statement, and now with rte. Waste of time and money.
     
  7. badgolfer

    badgolfer Well-Known Member

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    squats dont work the core. im sure his his trainer asked him his goals and he designed a program based on that. im more concerned with having good core stability than being able to squat four hundred pounds.
     
  8. Kino

    Kino Well-Known Member

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    And your background or education in exercise physiology or body mechanics is...?
    And you've properly evaluated this members existing postural distortions, and muscle imbalances...?
     
  9. bradh

    bradh Well-Known Member

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    Not everyone wants to squat excessive weight and even if they do some good core excercises with the "sissy ball" is a good way to start. I agree if you can squat 400 pounds i'm sure you have a very strong core but the difference is some people are already there no point for them to use balance balls at that point.

    To say that the trainer was a waste of money from this example is ludricous.
     
  10. BigDog

    BigDog Well-Known Member

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    Just depends on what you want

    Big muscles is not all there is to being an athlete.

    Balance and recovery and stabilization response are every bit as important.

    Personally, I think that sounds like a GREAT trainer. After all, who needs a trainer to just do squats and bench?

    I think that these are supposed to work with the more conventional lifting to get someone to be a better athlete.
     
  11. Jaybird

    Jaybird Well-Known Member

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    I agree.

    I think many trainers out there are complete idiots. Especially the ones at university gyms. We have this one female trainer, is probably about 5'5" and over 200 pounds. Nothing against large people, but if she's such a good trainer, why is she 200 pounds?

    My rule of thumb is this:

    I approach trainers with a little skepticism. I use them only when necessary. I don't take any advice from them or try any techniques that they cannot do themselves.
     
  12. tennisball

    tennisball Well-Known Member

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    And you've seen this trainer's certification? Seeing as one can get "certification" over the internet for a mere $20 from irreputable websites...

    I never said I wanted to or were capable of evaluating this member's physiological issues. To paraphrase, I merely said that to squat 400lbs would take a good amount of core stability and strength. To the poster who claimed that squats don't use core muscles, you obviously haven't squatted heavy weights before. Besides the targetted major muscle groups required for squats, the erector spinae, rectus abdominus, obliques and transverse abdominus all are recruited to stabilize, among other smaller, secondary stabilizing muscles. Some major power lifters and even some bodybuilders don't do direct ab or lower back work since compound leg work takes care of all that for them.

    We all have different goals. If this exercise were for balance or some other purpose, maybe the original poster benefited. But I am usually wary when trainers break out the new equipment to justify their existence, and end up forgetting the simple, time-tested exercises. Then again, they wouldn't have a job if everyone were squatting, benching, deadlifting, and doing pullups the old fashioned way to build muscle.



     
  13. Chris

    Chris Well-Known Member

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    I think many of us will subscribe to the fact that each individual responds differently to different stimuli, case in point, how many times have we heard or said things like "Do what works best for you" or "Everyone's body is different" ??

    Yet the stigma of personal trainers seems to be that if they go against the current trends within the community, their automatically brushed off as someone who doesn't know what they're doing, now I won't say whether or not this particular trainer is good or bad because we only have one very small instance to judge.

    I will say however that some of the best personal trainers out there often throw set ways and thinking to the wind which is how new training methodology is created, a trainer is supposed to tailor fit a program to the specific individual, not the other way around, this notion that as a trainer, we must always use a pre-determined routine on each of our clients is just retarded no matter how established the program might be, what works for some may not work for others.

    It's okay to be skeptical about PT's, lord knows there are some out there who really don't know what their doing, but I was taught as a child to read the story first before I started judging the book by it's cover...
     
  14. jsbrook

    jsbrook Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Kino. Stability and strength imbalances are often overlooked and can lead to problems down the line. This was one workout. It doesn't mean the trainer won't have him doing standard exercises with heavy weights.
     
  15. jsbrook

    jsbrook Well-Known Member

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    I think this is taken out of context a little bit. And I 'm sure Kino would agree with you. If you're squatting 400lbs all these things are in line. Kino probably meant this is necessary if you every want to lift heavy weights. And the trainer's evaluation was by no means a bad thing.

    What canada said was right.

    Eric Cressy, John Berardi, Mike Roberson, and plenty of other top strength coaches and masters of the iron game will all tell you that postural evaluations, stability assessment, and identifying muscle imbalances is a good thing. Not necessary for every trainee, and it's certainly possible to just launch into lifting without it. But in no way is it a 'waste'.
     
  16. Jaybird

    Jaybird Well-Known Member

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    This is a little off topic.

    I agree that trainers have their place. I'm sure many of the JSF members are trainers. I mean no offense.

    But I think a lot of people use trainers as a crutch in leiu of doing their own research. They rely on trainers to give them a program and motivation and need them to hold their hand. There are so many resources out there--web, books, etc, that can put you on the correct path without the need to be fed on a silver platter. Fitness requires intense motivation, and that can only come from within. If you rely on someone else to motivate you, you will probably fail. If you cannot design your own program that responds to your body (responding to the way you interpret your own body) your success may not be maximized.

    Sure, it takes trainers to write that good information found in books that I've researched. I'm aware of that. My problem is two-fold: people relying on trainers as a crutch, and bad trainers. I believe that bad information is far more worse than no information. This is why I approach trainers with a little skepticism. We need trainers to advance the science of fitness. But the combination of bad trainers being the crutch for insufficiently motivated people is very dangerous combination.
     
  17. jsbrook

    jsbrook Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. And a lot of trainers suck. They'll start people on a program heavy on machines and light on free weights and compound, multi-joint exercises. And keep them there indefinitely. Not saying there aren't good ones-but a lot of bad ones.
     
  18. badgolfer

    badgolfer Well-Known Member

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    the only core muscle you listed were the Transverse Abdominis. as far as i know you dont work those while doing squats. i double checked here and i dont see them listed. abs obliques and erector spinae are not your core muscles. you could also check this thread by Marcus which is stickied here . im not too sure what you consider heavy but i do sets with 225 and i attempt to hold a vaccum and kegel throughout all of my reps.
     
  19. Kino

    Kino Well-Known Member

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    I had no intention of jumping on anybody here. I'm mearly trying to point out that just because something doesn't seem familiar, it doesn't mean that it isn't as effective, if not more effective than what's viewed as "traditional training". In the trainer in questions case...based simply on what I read in the original post, he's up to speed on functional training modalities. Who he's certified through isn't as important as his knowledge base...which I would be more inclined to trust than what I read in an internet forum.
    I'm not even going to get into the body mechanics being stressed in the opening exercises and their resulting long term benefits. What I would like to say is...the original poster appears to have a trainer who knows what he's doing. Just because there are members who don't understand the training philosophies being used...it doesn't mean they should try and ruin somebody elses opportunity to learn what could be some very valuable techniques. While I personally might have let him take the vest off after he flopped on the floor the first time...the principles were valid.
    I bet the next time the poster tries that exercise (hopefuly on his own) he'll do better...because the CNS did learn from the first experience.
     
  20. jsbrook

    jsbrook Well-Known Member

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    RECTUS ABDOMINIS. Check his post again and your own links.
     

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