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Running Shoes bad for Joints?

Discussion in 'Gym Equipment' started by Llirik, Jan 13, 2010.

  1. Llirik

    Llirik Well-Known Member

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    http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/news/20100107/running-shoes-hazardous-may-be-to-your-joints

    Jan. 7, 2010 -- Compared to running barefoot, running in conventional running shoes increases stress on the knee joints up to 38%, according to a new study.

    ''There is an increase in joint torque that may be detrimental," says D. Casey Kerrigan, MD, the lead author of the study, published in PM&R: The Journal of Injury, Function and Rehabilitation.

    Joint torque is a measure of how much a force causes the joint to rotate.


    --------------------

    Oh great, just the shoe brand that I chose as my favorite because it felt like they're easy on my knees, with good pronation support.

    Oh well. I guess it's jogging in my socks in Chicago winter.
     
  2. kmfisher

    kmfisher Well-Known Member

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    Have you read the book "Born To Run"? There's an entire chapter and numerous parts throughout the book that talk about the evils of running shoes and why they are bad for you. It's a great book, I highly recommend it. It will make you want to run.
     
  3. enamit

    enamit Active Member

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    so what kind of shoes are you suppsose to run in?
     
  4. Llirik

    Llirik Well-Known Member

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    Without any further research, I'm going to keep running in my Brooks. So far, I've had a great experience with them. When they expire, I'll probably do a bit more reading before I buy my next pair.
     
  5. njprime

    njprime Active Member

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  6. George

    George Senior Member

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    These seem to be getting more and more popular, which makes me happy. I've also seen Cressey recommend Nike Frees, Reebok Travel Trainers, and old-school Puma flats. Also:

    I actually saw a guy running barefoot on campus a few weeks ago. It was pretty surprising 'cause I'm up in Michigan and we still had a lot of snow on the ground.
     
  7. needachange

    needachange Active Member

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    I have 4 pairs of these, that's how much I love them :D
     
  8. roxy1

    roxy1 Well-Known Member

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    i must say, ive run in New Balance all my life, and occasionally Brooks. i bought some Nike Air Vomero 4's against my better judgement (or so i thought). no more aching joints after a long run. the cushioning is far beyond that of any shoe i have ever run in. but, they definitely will not work for anyone who is a significant pronator.
     
  9. Supmuhhumbruh

    Supmuhhumbruh Active Member

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    I have a pair of vibrams as well. i use to them for both lifting and running, absolutely great product
     
  10. salia000

    salia000 Active Member

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    Barefoot, or minimalist shoes are the way to go. I've suffered from ITB on both knees and it raelly put a damper on my first marathon, but I've been injury-free since losing padded sneakers. In fact, I've noted thath the more expensive the sneaker, the more likely I was to get injured. Do yourselves a favor and just try it. Human evolution got it right.
     
  11. Speedster

    Speedster Active Member

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    So, Salia, what type of show do you wear?
     
  12. Llirik

    Llirik Well-Known Member

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    I've seen these before. What scares me is that when I run, first part of foot that meets the pavement is the heel, then roll toward toes. I mention this because I have read that some people actually run by letting the front of the foot hit the ground first.
    Since I mostly run on concrete or asphalt, having the heel hit the hard surface in these unpadded shoes, scares me when I think about the transfer of impact to all other joints.

    If I ran on dirt, I really think I would try these.

    This is exactly why I bought my Brooks. Nice pronation support.
     
  13. needachange

    needachange Active Member

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    Classic heel striking. It's the worst way to run. It slows your stride down with every step and it's horrible on your joints.

    Look into Pose Running. If you do a google search or youtube you can see how this techinique is. You should be landing on your forefoot not your heels. Once you get it down you will be able to run longer and more likely injury free.

    Prepare for your calves to get sore for a bit until you adjust ;)
     
  14. salia000

    salia000 Active Member

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    I wear the Five Finger KSO's or go completely barefoot, depending upon the location and distance.

    As for heel striking, you will adjust your form automatically when running with minimalistic shoes or barefoot, as heel striking becomes literally impossible. In fact, running shoes, with their big heels, promote heel striking, which is one of the principle reasons they increase stress on joints.

    But don't take my work for it. go outside, take of your shoes, and run. You'll see.
     
  15. Llirik

    Llirik Well-Known Member

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    Oh yeah. Tried it. It hurts :nod:
     
  16. Rishi P

    Rishi P Well-Known Member

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    I'm actually in the market for some new running shoes myself, any suggestions....and no I don't see myself running barefoot since I usually run on a track lol
     
  17. needachange

    needachange Active Member

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    Check out the Nike Frees.
     
  18. Llirik

    Llirik Well-Known Member

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    So I went for a jog last night. Tried to place my foot differently, with the front hitting the pavement before the heel. As awkward as it felt, I could tell the difference in the impact against the surface.
    Two things I noticed.
    1. Shoes have to fit perfectly as the foot slides a slight bit toward to front of the shoe. I was wearing wrong socks.
    2. the shoe itself seems to try and skid by a hair on the pavement - but that might have to do with the angle at which I positioned my body.

    I'm gonna try to keep at it.
     
  19. needachange

    needachange Active Member

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    Sounds like you are trying to glide your feet along the ground with your stride.

    You need to lean forward a little bit (not at the waist, at the ankle). Best way to describe it would be "controlled falling" so you actually increase your cadence. Also, kick your heels up toward your butt.

    Watch some videos on Youtube. There are a lot of demonstrations on the technique.

    Here read this.......

    "Gravity is a vertical force, which can be transformed into a horizontal movement only under certain conditions which are demonstrated when the body over-balances (falls forward like a unicyclist leaning forward to move). At this point the foot must leave the ground quickly to allow the body to fall forwards.

    Therefore, the key to successful running is to maintain the falling forwards of the body with minimal effort from the legs. The foot should not be in front of the body's general centre of mass because it will break or stop the body falling forwards."


    Here's a summary of Pose Running techniques:

    * Raise your ankle straight up under your hip, using the hamstrings

    * Keep your support time - your foot on the ground time - short

    * Support - ground contact - is on the balls of your feet

    * The heels do not touch the ground

    * Don't 'spring' off your toes: raise your foot from your ankle when your weight is on the ball of your foot

    * Keep your ankle fixed at the same angle

    * Knees bent at all times

    * Keep your feet remain behind the vertical line going through your knees

    * Keep your stride length short

    * Keep knees and thighs down, close together, and relaxed

    * Always focus on pulling the foot from the ground, not on the landing

    * Do not point or land on the toes (see Fig 3: Toe running)

    * Gravity, not muscles, determine where your feet land

    * Shoulders, hips and ankles are kept in vertical alignment

    Summarizing Pose Basics

    1. Your lean is your speed. Lean from the ankles, not the waist. Lean more to go faster, lean less to slow down.

    2. Keep your strides short, with your leading foot under your body, not ahead of it. Foot plant in front of the body slow you down.

    3. Your stride cadence should be fast, with cadence in the 180's per minute. Your cardiovascular system will adapt! To go faster (lean more) and pick up the cadence!

    4. Land on your forefoot. Not on your toes, and not on your heel. Pose running suggests a landing between the mid foot and ball of the foot.

    5. Keep your feet parallel, pointing straight ahead. Just say "no" to pronation!

    6. Your body is like the letter S, but with a straight back with no lean from the waist. Your knees are always slightly bent - especially at impact. Ideally, your running height is a couple of inches shorter than your standing height.
     
  20. Llirik

    Llirik Well-Known Member

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