1. Have you installed the new JSF Mobile app? Check out all the details here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. One account & one avatar for all of JSF. Unified login and profile. Forum alerts on the main site, and more. Check out the details here: Forum & main site unified account feature is live!
    Dismiss Notice

Running and lifting together a problem?

Discussion in 'Introductions & Advice For Beginners' started by brandonaw, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. brandonaw

    brandonaw Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Messages:
    106
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just got into MMA training. It's purely for fun but it's pretty intense. I'm trying to find a way keep with my running and lifting schedule as well. My MMA is Monday, Wednesday and Saturday for about 1.5 to 2 hours. On the alternating days I'm thinking of doing a full body routine with a 3 mile run afterward. I'm 6'4", 215 lbs, 18% bf and looking to lean out to about 195. Pros and cons of lifting and running together?
     
  2. Jaer

    Jaer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    Messages:
    3,159
    Media:
    2
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    36
    I am going to guess that you will likely here one or more of the following:

    - If you can run 3 miles after a workout, you didn't workout intensely enough with your lifts. Add weight, reduce rest time.

    - You'll have burned through all your carbs while lifting. Make sure to carb up before running or you'll be burning muscle.

    - You'll need protein after lifting. Make sure to get some.

    - After lifting, your muscles are going to be craving nutrients--you need a big insulin spike after lifting, and running lowers insulin levels. It's going to prevent you from growing.

    - Running is a waste of time unless you want to be a runner. Your lifting and MMA training is more than enough.

    - Train for one thing at a time. Pick which you want to be able to do: run or MMA.

    - You can, but you'll burn out and over train.

    Some of these you wouldn't hear here, but you hit a few forums, and likely you'll get some of these response. Well, now you got them all at once.

    The real questions are, do you enjoy lifting? Running? MMA? All at the same time? Will you enjoy and continue to enjoy this method of training?

    If so, then do it. If not, then don't.

    Is it optimal? That depends on many, many variables--some of them unique to each individual. This seems like a lot of activity: you will need to make sure you are getting enough rest and enough food to keep up with this kind of schedule. You might need sports drinks or carb-ups to switch from lifting to running.

    It all depends on you and what you like.

    Jaer
    says try it and see if you like it. If it feels like too much work or too much of a time investment, cut it back some. You don't need to do that much to drop the weight and lean out--but you can do that much if that's what you want.
     
  3. Shpedly

    Shpedly Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I dont think you'll get a better answer than what Jaer said. He pretty much nailed it IMO. I agree its one or the other, but I do find 20 minutes on the treadmill before lifting really helps get the blood flowing. I feel nice and jazzed up, ready for some grunting.
     
  4. macdiver

    macdiver Well-Known Member
    Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2010
    Messages:
    4,986
    Likes Received:
    213
    I'm currently training for a half marathon in the spring and a full in the fall. I am also continuing to lift. My thought is the lifting will keep my body from canabolizing the muscle on the long runs. The body will say " hey I need those muscles for tomorrows lifts". :) Just need to eat enough to sustain the long runs.
     
  5. sauron256

    sauron256 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've gained plenty of muscle while running. I never run and lift on the same day. I do my running because it's something I enjoy, much like John Stone and his biking. I very rarely hear someone say "you shouldn't bike and lift at the same time."
     
  6. justin6case

    justin6case Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    I also agree that Jaer's post was full of excellent advice.

    My personal experience as a runner was I could not gain muscle mass although I did get stronger. This obviously could have been due to not eating enough or a number of other variables. Like Jaer said, it really comes down to what you're goals are.

    Anyway, check out the link below. I have read this article several times as I think it is full of valuable information not just for runners, but any lifter or athlete. I think you'll enjoy it.

    http://ericcressey.com/five-resistance-training-myths-in-the-running-world
     
  7. Jaer

    Jaer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    Messages:
    3,159
    Media:
    2
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    36
    Great article. Not sure if I have read that before--some points seem familiar--but always good to review (and now bookmark!).

    I started running more spring of last year. Before then, I might have done some interval sprints on a treadmill or around the local track, and I did the occasional run with my bro, but it wasn't much.

    Last year, I started much longer running training a couple times a week, and sometimes did an early morning 20 minute jog.

    But I never stopped doing some sort of resistance training.

    Last fall, I did 2 5ks and a 10-miler. I'm now working on improving my speed and working up to a half-marathon. Through Jan, I've been getting in one long run a week on the weekends (roughly 7-8 miles), and I do my lifts during the week, 3-4 days of resistance training (and one day of snow shoveling the past 3 weeks--curse you winter! :curses:)

    I keep my lifting days and my running days separate. I have, in the past, done sprints on a treadmill after lifting (though, if I can keep up a decent sprint after lifting, I make sure to shorten my rest times next lifting session) or alternated walk-/run for 20 minutes as a finisher, but I rarely go long or far.

    I enjoy running and want to get better out--speed and distance. But I try to blend my running and lifting so they they don't interfere with each other. Lift hard and heavy on lifting days, run long and fast on running days.

    Jaer
    felt like he should give a little background on his running history considering that advice post. Better to know where advice is coming from (someone with at least a little experience, but not a long-time runner!).
     
  8. justin6case

    justin6case Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Your original question was, "Will running interfere with my lifting?" I guess the answer depends on what your goals are for lifting. If you want to gain mass, my personal belief (that I believe I could support if I had to with scientific evidence) is that it's a difficult task. If you simply want to know if it's "OK" to do both, absolutely. That's why I recommended the Eric Cressey article. Any athlete can benefit from lifting.

    Here is another excellent article. http://alwyncosgrove.com/2010/01/hierarchy-of-fat-loss/ While it's mostly targeted at fat loss, he addresses the need to pick and focus on one goal at a time. I for two years wanted to get faster as a half-marathon/marathon runner AND build significant muscle mass. The goals completely contradicted each other and as a result my results were compromised. Can you share your goals with us so we can more accurately answer your question?

     
  9. James Metal

    James Metal Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Since you're going for MMA I would try to work running and cardio into your workout as much as possible. MMA is about as extreme is you're going to get and if I was going into the ring ready to fight and not get destroyed myself, i'd be training every day for it.
     
  10. marked

    marked Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2004
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0


    Really enjoyed this threads, with the hierarchy of Fat Loss. I wondered though. I'm a family man now, with 2 kids under 3, so I don't get to the gym until 20:15ish, and that gives me 1h 20 to 1h 30 of time per session (3 times per week). I generally do 1h of exhausting weight (I really feel tired after it) and then maybe some ab work (once a week) or cardio. I tend to do the high heart rate aerobic on a rower of X-Trainer, but wondering if switching to hill mode (interval) would work more, or am I in danger of eating my muscles (I don't know if glycogen has depleted that much at that point).

    Anyone any advice. E.g Interval Train directly after weights, or still high heart rate steady state?
     
  11. justin6case

    justin6case Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    @marked, I just read the below article yesterday. It made me rethink my opinions on cardio a little. I still don't think spending upwards of 2-2.5 hours a week running is helpful for building muscle mass, but cardio has it's place in maintaining a good body composition. Maybe the article will help answer your question.

    http://blog.holygrailbodytransformation.com/?p=112
     

Share This Page