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Rowing Question....

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by HevyMetal, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. HevyMetal

    HevyMetal Well-Known Member

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    On a good rowing machine you use your legs as well as your back and arms. The seat slides.

    How does this compare to rowing from say a 10ft rowboat where the seat does not slide?

    Is the boat row harder on the back? Although the back does not move very much. But the legs don't move at all..
     
  2. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    I think it's quite a bit harder in general.

    The seats also slide on competitive rowboats, but not on your classic fisherman or lovers-on-a-lake type.
     
  3. Jaer

    Jaer Well-Known Member

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    Having rowed the machine and rowed in a old school row boat, I would not say the row boat was in any way harder on the back, shoulders, or arms.

    I will say that I went a hell of a lot slower than the supposed speed of row machine because I could not get all the strength of my legs and back into it. I think that is the variable that will be most affected by moving seats and such.

    If you could match speed, then yes I would think the arms and back would be doing a lot more work!

    Jaer
    prefers kayaks to row boats.
     
  4. digitalnebula

    digitalnebula Plagiarist

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    Seems like they would be incredibly different....

    A row machine is ignoring everything except power and output...
    A row boat, you actually have to steer and be concerned with a gazillion other things....

    It's like comparing running on a treadmill and running up a mountain side littered with tree roots, covered in rocks and ice...
    (They are both "running" but *completely* different)

    Seems very apples and oranges to me.

    Edit:
    Not saying it wouldn't be a great workout...

    Maybe a better example would be doing squats on a smith machine versus real squats....real squats make you use many additional muscle groups...
     

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