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"Read 50 Books In 2010" Challenge

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussions' started by phillydude, Jan 6, 2010.

  1. phillydude

    phillydude Don't Never Give Up.

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    1) American Band by Kristen Laine (B+)
    2) Idyll Banter by Chris Bohjalian (B-)
    3) It's Only Temporary by Evan Handler (C)
    4) Teenage by Jon Savage (A)
    5) Punk Rock Dad by Jim Lindberg (B)
    6) The St. Tropez Diet by Apostolos Pappas (C+)
    7) High School Confidential by Jeremy Iversen (A+)
    8) The Way You Wear Your Hat by Bill Zehme (A-)
    9) England's Dreaming by Jon Savage (B-)

    In Progress:
    Meat Market by Bruce Feldman
    The Millionaire Workout by Ryan Lee (combines a fitness program with a step-by-step internet entrepreneurship guide)

    In Queue:
    Become A Better You by Joel Osteen

    I was a little disappointed by England's Dreaming... it's obvious that the author learned from the experience of writing this, his first book, and put that knowledge into Teenage. Sure, it was full of facts and interviews (and the discography was worth the book's considerable weight on it's own) but the sheer volume of material wasn't organized well enough to create a cohesive narrative. As in Teenage, Savage presented historical information to augment the storyline (giving background to the action), but here he needed to explain more about the culture, especially for an American audience not as familiar with British politics and idealogies. God Save The Queen, indeed.
     
  2. phillydude

    phillydude Don't Never Give Up.

    Joined:
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    Finished:
    1) American Band by Kristen Laine (B+)
    2) Idyll Banter by Chris Bohjalian (B-)
    3) It's Only Temporary by Evan Handler (C)
    4) Teenage by Jon Savage (A)
    5) Punk Rock Dad by Jim Lindberg (B)
    6) The St. Tropez Diet by Apostolos Pappas (C+)
    7) High School Confidential by Jeremy Iversen (A+)
    8) The Way You Wear Your Hat by Bill Zehme (A-)
    9) England's Dreaming by Jon Savage (B-)
    10) The Millionaire Workout by Ryan Lee (B/D)

    In Progress:
    Meat Market by Bruce Feldman

    In Queue:
    Become A Better You by Joel Osteen

    I breezed through Millionaire Workout in about two hours. I'm giving it a B for the business development portion of the book and a D for the nutrition and fitness portions of the book. Nothing new or interesting nutritionally, and the fitness was definitely geared toward someone with no experience in the gym (the majority of the exercises were bodyweight and cardio/aerobic-type things). He's big on the whole "This workout should take no longer than four minutes, because hey, we're busy entrepreneurs!" thing.
     
  3. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    Audio Books
    1)Einstein: His Life and Universe by Walter Isaacson

    Books
    1)The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession by Allison Hoover Bartlett
    2) Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom by Daniel T. Willingham
    3) The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child by Donalyn Miller

    Graphic Novels
    1)Absolute Sandman Vol 2

    Probably the best book I'll read this year. No joke. It's not a book for parents it's more for teachers since it talks about teaching in the classroom. It really validated everything I want to do in my classroom. There was a couple of things in there I've told to some of my higher ups recently and I was kind of scoffed at for saying it. I knew I was right but still doubted myself and this book really helped me realize that what I knew all along. Very motivational for me at this point in time.
     
  4. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    I have the Complete Sherlock and Shakespeare and I was wondering how you all would break the books apart?

    For the Complete Sherlock, 3 volumes, I'm guessing the novels would obviosly count as 1 a pice, How 'bout the short stories?

    And Shakespeare, 1 play or 2 plays count for one? I'm pretty sure all the sonnets can count as one.
     
  5. misterjingo

    misterjingo Well-Known Member

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    I think you should count each play as one, and each volume of the short stories as one as well.
     
  6. guava

    guava Elite Member
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    I'm going to list my magazines on here as well, but I'm going to just add to the tally instead of listing the title again for each issue I read.
    1. The Great Man by Kate Christensen
    2. The Naked Ape by Desmond Morris :sleep:
    3. The Essential Crazy Wisdom by Wes Nisker:)
    4. Bachelor Brothers' Bed and Breakfast by Bill Richardson
    5. The Oxford Book of Comic Verse :sleep:
    6. Scientific American - 3 issues
    7. Real Simple - 3 issues
    8. Chatelaine/Canadian Living - 4 issues
    9. Flare/Fashion/LouLou/Wish - 4 issues

    Scientific American has been fun. A generous portion of each issue seems to be devoted to greening the environment. There was a most interesting article on Growing Skyscrapers: The Rise of Vertical Farms.

    I think I'm going to skip Beauty Tips from Moose Jaw by Will Ferguson. It doesn't seem to be as exciting as I'd wanted.

    I've started The Origin of Species by Nino Ricci. It seems to fit quite well with the type of story I enjoy. Not much plot, and highly developed descriptions of perfectly flawed characters. I think it will be filled with discovery and hope. :heart:
     
  7. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    [1] Rushdie, Salman. Haroun and the Sea of Stories. London: Granta, 1990. (211 pages.)
    (+) Cicero. Excerpt from Against Catiline. 63 BC. Translated by C.D. Yonge. 1856. (9 pages.)
    (+) Caesar. Excerpt from Commentaries on the Civil War. c. 45 BC. Translated by William Duncan. 1856. (19 pages.)
    (+) Vergil. Excerpts from Eclogues and Aeneid. c. 38 BC, c. 25 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2001. (14 pages.)
    [2] Rushdie, Salman. Midnight's Children. 1981. New York: Random, 2006. (533 pages.)
    (+) Horace. Selections from Satires, Epistles, and Odes. c. 35 BC, c. 20 BC, c. 23 and 13 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2005. (17 pages.)
    (+) Livy. Excerpts from From the Foundation of the City. c. 26 BC. Translated by T.J. Luce. 1998. (21 pages.)
    [3] Rushdie, Salman. The Satanic Verses. 1988. New York: Random, 2008. (561 pages.)
    (+) Propertius. Selections from Book I. c. 25 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2008. (14 pages.)
    [4] Moreland, Floyd, and Rita Fleischer. "Units 10-18." Latin: An Intensive Course. 1977. Berkeley: UC Press, 1990. (154 pages.)
    (+) Ovid. Selections from Amores. c. 16 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2001. (18 pages.)
     
    #107 chicanerous, Feb 23, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  8. ianmez

    ianmez Well-Known Member

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    I read her blog and occasionally comment on it, too. I like what she has to say. This definitely makes me want to pick up this book.

    Do you mind if I ask which grade you teach?
     
  9. guava

    guava Elite Member
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    Changed my mind. I read Beauty Tips. It's actually a Canadian History book, so I thought there would be a chance I might learn something valuable from it. It's undetermined yet whether or not I did.
    1. The Great Man by Kate Christensen
    2. The Naked Ape by Desmond Morris :sleep:
    3. The Essential Crazy Wisdom by Wes Nisker:)
    4. Bachelor Brothers' Bed and Breakfast by Bill Richardson
    5. The Oxford Book of Comic Verse :sleep:
    6. Scientific American - 3 issues
    7. Real Simple - 3 issues
    8. Chatelaine/Canadian Living - 4 issues
    9. Flare/Fashion/LouLou/Wish - 4 issues
    10. Beauty Tips from Moose Jaw by Will Ferguson

    Still reading The Origin of Species by Nino Ricci.
     
  10. phillydude

    phillydude Don't Never Give Up.

    Joined:
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    Finished:
    1) American Band by Kristen Laine (B+)
    2) Idyll Banter by Chris Bohjalian (B-)
    3) It's Only Temporary by Evan Handler (C)
    4) Teenage by Jon Savage (A)
    5) Punk Rock Dad by Jim Lindberg (B)
    6) The St. Tropez Diet by Apostolos Pappas (C+)
    7) High School Confidential by Jeremy Iversen (A+)
    8) The Way You Wear Your Hat by Bill Zehme (A-)
    9) England's Dreaming by Jon Savage (B-)
    10) The Millionaire Workout by Ryan Lee (B/D)
    11) Meat Market by Bruce Feldman (C)

    In Queue:
    Become A Better You by Joel Osteen
    I Feel Great by Pat Croce

    Meat Market was just OK. Too many "characters" (prospective college football players) but not enough in-depth story on any of them to get a clear picture of who they are (and why we should care). This made following the action very confusing, and after a while, it became a grind to finish the book. To top it off, the head coach gets fired at the end (but ends up with the New Orleans Saints... and only lasts a year, leaving one season before they won the Super Bowl).
     
  11. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    It's a great book, I'm a 4th grade bilingual teacher (Spanish)
     
  12. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    Audio Books
    1)Einstein: His Life and Universe by Walter Isaacson

    Books
    1)The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession by Allison Hoover Bartlett
    2) Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom by Daniel T. Willingham
    3) The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child by Donalyn Miller

    Graphic Novels
    1)Absolute Sandman Vol 2

    Children's Books
    1) The Witches by Roald Dahl
    2) Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney


    I decided to make a seperate category for kids books, I'll lump young adult fiction with the "books"

    I read DWK today at BnN and I thought the first half was pretty funny, mostly because I did a lot of the stuff in the book as a kid, really most of the stuff in the whole book. But one thing I did not like was that the main character is a punk, I could not find one reedeming quality in him. I guess he does show some growth at the end but it doesn't seem enough (at least to me) I realize that might not be the point of the book for kids. The point is to get a good laugh an it does succeed at that and I get why kids like it but I can't see myself reading anymore of them. I got the point with this book. But I'll purchase the whole set if it means my students will read 'em.

    Now The Witches, want can I say, it's a classic. I did kind of cheat for this one. I read it to my class so I'm counting it here. Roald Dahl was a master. Every year I read a Roald Dahl book to my class, I usually rotate, depending on the class, and this year I chose this one. Thing about Dahl is that he writes in a way even developing readers can understand. The whole story pretty much happens in one day but the amount of detail is just what I love about his books.
     
  13. guava

    guava Elite Member
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    Do you read Andrew Clements? He writes the most beautiful books about the small little dramas in life. :love:

    Teaching guides here. If I was a fourth grade teacher, I would definitely encourage all of my students to read them.
     
  14. never2old

    never2old Well-Known Member

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  15. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    The first book I read from him was Frindle, good book, funny too. I read it aloud for the two years I was in 5th grade and they liked it. Except for this one chapter, forget which one it's long and pretty boring when you read it aloud.

    I found that I could not read it to my students in 4th. Language aside, I did need to scaffold a lot of the vocabulary with them, but they don't get the humor. Maybe it's a cultural thing.

    I've also read Landry News and Janiitor's Boy. I've enjoyed all of them. I've had Things Not Seen on my shelf for quite some time but haven't got around to it.

    Two years ago I read the Wizard of Oz to my 4th grade class and I was afraid that they wouldn't understand it. I did go over a lot of vocabulary but overall, they had not problem with it. I think some stories just speak to people and can be so engrossing that they can understand it no matter how hard the words are.

    Roald Dahl books seem to have that magic too.

    The Wizard of Oz was one of my favorite read aloud experiences. They seemed to like it too, they liked it more than a play that we saw and many liked it more than the movie.

    One day, while I was reading the book, I switched out the first letter of the Witch by accident. I kept reading hoping no one would notice but I was fooling no one. It was a good laugh. All the while I felt like telling them "Well...she is a one." Maybe Freud was right.
     
  16. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    Audio Books
    1) Einstein: His Life and Universe by Walter Isaacson
    2) Brain Rules: 12 principles for surviving andthriving at work, home and school by John Medina
    3) How to Win Friends and Inluence People by Dale Carnegie

    Books
    1)The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession by Allison Hoover Bartlett
    2) Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom by Daniel T. Willingham
    3) The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child by Donalyn Miller

    Graphic Novels
    1)Absolute Sandman Vol 2

    Children's Books
    1) The Witches by Roald Dahl
    2) Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney


    Brain Rules was :blank:. I don't know about some of the stuff he states in there, like working in gender groups.

    How to Win friends though was pretty good though. I already knew I was a jerk...this book confirmed it. I'm thinking of buying it in book format so I can review it periodically.
     
  17. George

    George Senior Member

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    1) Tai Chi by Christian Hanche
    2) 5/3/1 Manual by Jim Wendler
    3) Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut
    4) Free Culture by Lawrence Lessig
    5) As a Man Thinketh by James Allen
    6) Wise Blood by Flannery O'Conner
    7) Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe
    8) South of the Border, West of the Sun by Haruki Murakami
    9) 5/3/1 Manual by Jim Wendler
    10) A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold


    On spring break right now so I knocked out a few short things. Didn't read anything in February. :o
     
  18. Nowhereman

    Nowhereman Well-Known Member

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    Audio Books
    1) Einstein: His Life and Universe by Walter Isaacson
    2) Brain Rules: 12 principles for surviving andthriving at work, home and school by John Medina
    3) How to Win Friends and Inluence People by Dale Carnegie

    Books
    1)The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession by Allison Hoover Bartlett
    2) Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom by Daniel T. Willingham
    3) The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child by Donalyn Miller
    4) Raising a Bilingual Child by Barbara Zurer Pearson

    Graphic Novels
    1)Absolute Sandman Vol 2

    Children's Books
    1) The Witches by Roald Dahl
    2) Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    3a) Gooney Bird Greene by Lois Lowry

    I don't think I'm any closer on making a decision as to what language we'll speak to our child. The book presented One Parent One language, Minority Language at home, and Time and Place. But then the final chapters kind of say that it might be best to use the minority language at home until it's time to start schooling. I would not mind the latter that much but we do have friends that speak English only and I would hate for our child to be out of the loop and quite honestly I love reading aloud in English so I feel like I would be missing out on something there. I plan to read two more books on the subject though.


    And Gooney Bird is a great read for kids looking to get started on story telling. She is quite a character. It's a short book and I'll count that one and the book I'm reading aloud in class right now as one book, since they are kind of small. Every teacher I've recommended it to loves it, great for writing.
     
    #118 Nowhereman, Mar 9, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010
  19. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    [1] Rushdie, Salman. Haroun and the Sea of Stories. London: Granta, 1990. (211 pages.)
    (+) Cicero. Excerpt from Against Catiline. 63 BC. Translated by C.D. Yonge. 1856. (9 pages.)
    (+) Caesar. Excerpt from Commentaries on the Civil War. c. 45 BC. Translated by William Duncan. 1856. (19 pages.)
    (+) Vergil. Excerpts from Eclogues and Aeneid. c. 38 BC, c. 25 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2001. (14 pages.)
    [2] Rushdie, Salman. Midnight's Children. 1981. New York: Random, 2006. (533 pages.)
    (+) Horace. Selections from Satires, Epistles, and Odes. c. 35 BC, c. 20 BC, c. 23 and 13 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2005. (17 pages.)
    (+) Livy. Excerpts from From the Foundation of the City. c. 26 BC. Translated by T.J. Luce. 1998. (21 pages.)
    [3] Rushdie, Salman. The Satanic Verses. 1988. New York: Random, 2008. (561 pages.)
    (+) Propertius. Selections from Book I. c. 25 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2008. (14 pages.)
    [4] Moreland, Floyd, and Rita Fleischer. "Units 10-18." Latin: An Intensive Course. 1977. Berkeley: UC Press, 1990. (154 pages.)
    (+) Ovid. Selections from Amores. c. 16 BC. Translated by A.S. Kline. 2001. (18 pages.)
    [5] Rushdie, Salman. The Moor's Last Sigh. Vintage: New York, 1995. (434 pages.)


    The Moor's Last Sigh is my favorite of the Rushdie books I've read this year. Though I'll wait a while to make a final decision, I think I'd even put it on par with my all time favorite books:

    - The Count of Monte Cristo (Dumas)
    - The Magus (Fowles)
    - The Chronicles of Dune (Herbert)
    - American Psycho (Ellis)
    - The House Behind the Cedars (Chesnutt)

    It's especially good having read Midnight's Children and The Satanic Verses first, as a clear progression of themes and refinement of Rushdie's writing is visible, even if the novel marks a shift away from some of the politics and values that he was most lauded for at the start of the career (and he remains critically valued for). Moreover, it offers an answer to the question of India's future raised at the end of Midnight's Children as it ultimately incorporates the child potential hope born at the end of that novel into its story.

    The aesthetic changes I enjoyed the most were a more cohesive exposition of history and family dynasty (genealogy and history already having been hashed out in a supremely digressive and non-linear fashion and subverted as absolutist constructions in the first two novels), a focus on strong and able characters (instead of weak, passive, ineffectual ones), especially women (who were often treated almost misogynistically and given relatively little agency in the first two novels), a reemphasis of the metaphorical largely in lieu of the magical, and the structuring notion of the palimpsest and the complexity it brings to the continued theme of doubling. Oh, and also strong and passionate lovers.
     
    #119 chicanerous, Mar 9, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010
  20. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic Well-Known Member

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    1. Let the Great World Spin, Collum McCann
    2. Savage Love, Dan Savage
    3. Forest Gate, Peter Akinti


    Audio books:


    Graphic Novels:


    I feel like I've read more than that since January. :confused: I wonder what I'm forgetting.
     
    #120 Chopaholic, Mar 9, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010

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