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Plantar Fasciitis - how to get rid of it?

Discussion in 'General Health/Fitness & Injuries' started by GatorDeb, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. GatorDeb

    GatorDeb Active Member

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    My left heel hurts all the time. It hurts less once I get moving. I need to take care of it because it's getting worse. I don't want to stop running, I love running.
     
  2. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    I've found one thing that helps me break up the tightness is to stand on a tennis ball, placing a lot of pressure on the tight areas of the arch, and rolling around for a minute or two. Really loosens it up for me.
     
  3. crazychemistryinaz

    crazychemistryinaz Active Member

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    Here I can offer some help from personal experience. I suffered from plantar fasciitis for several years. Went through cortisone injections and orthotic arch supports, which did not work. Finally physical therapy did the trick. It sounds like you are a regular runner, which will make beating it a bit hard. If you google the condition, you will find some stretches that are supposed to alleviate the pain. Ironically, stretching this tendon is the way to limit the pain. Also, for me, a night splint (a kind of boot) was a major help. Finally, exercises that strengthen the calf muscles and the feet can be done. I recommend looking for an orthopedist in the area who treats the condition. My experience with podiatrists was not good. Best of luck.
     
  4. jay_snizzel

    jay_snizzel Well-Known Member

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    GatorDeb
    I to am a runner, Had to stop lifting weights because I couldnt afford the gym membership any longer.

    I suffered with Plantar Fasciitis when I started out, It hurt first thing in the morning and when I stood up after sitting for long periods.
    I saw a Physio about it, and they gave me some simple stretching exercises to do daily.

    These were made up mainly of calf stretching exercises, really simple yet really effective.

    Tip Toe raises, and other similar stretches that you would think were just focusing on the calfs.
     
  5. Bluestreak

    Bluestreak Well-Known Member

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    I've had a lot of experience with it. I had it on/off for a year or so. I tried OTC anti-inflammatories (Aleve and the like), which helped for a while but wasn't a long-term solution. I saw a good podiatrist who forced me to rest it for a couple of weeks. Along with a cortisone injection and religious use of Spenco orthotic inserts, it's never bothered me again.

    The key factor, as much as I know an active person doesn't want to hear this... is rest. Get off it, stay off it, and use ice baths, too. Twenty minutes, once or twice a day. I'm especially sensitive to cold and it's not fun, but it really will help. Good shoes (don't let your shoes wear out too far!) and use of ortho's afterward will keep it away.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Primetime

    Primetime Well-Known Member

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    Found this thread after doing a search, and I've been diagnosed with the same condition. PT starts tomorrow, and I'm currently wearing orthodic inserts. I've got the night splint on order from amazon, so that should help. No more running or basket ball for me for 8 weeks. Can squats be done while having plantar fasciitis or not? Cycling?
     
  7. jdb-44

    jdb-44 Active Member

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    Primetime, I'm going through the same thing. Bone spurs on both heels, and I can actually see the one on my left foot: a small bump that sticks out from the inside of my left heel. The pain is not on the bottom of the heel; rather, it's on the back.

    I do stretches on the heel a few times a day, which provides temporary relief. I would like to avoid expensive (and possibly ineffective) orthotics and medication if possible.

    When I was doing squats, I had no problems. Well, I actually did, but that was my knees, not my feet. :) I don't see that cycling would be bad, but I'm not a doctor and haven't ridden a bike in years anyway.

    Good luck--let us know how you fare.
     
  8. Primetime

    Primetime Well-Known Member

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    UPDATE:

    -I am on my 11th week of dealing with this injury.
    -I receive ultrasound treatments and go to PT 3 times a week, a total of 33 visits.
    -I take ibuprofen every 6 hours.
    -I wear heal cups in all my shoes.
    -I have been doing the following exercises at a minimum of twice per day per recommendation by the doctor.

    -Plantar stretch using a 6 foot dog leash for 10 minutes. 45 sec on, 15 sec rest.
    -Thera-Band Foot Roller - 3 minutes
    -Toe ups 45
    -Weighted calf raises 45
    -Seated calf raises 45
    -Thera-Band stretches in all 4 directions
    -Standing calf stretches 5 minutes
    -Towel crunches (use toes to create ripples in a towel) 3 minutes
    -30 Body weight squats
    -25 Lunges (no weight)

    -I've been wearing the night splint every night.
    -I haven't been running or jumping or using an elliptical since the injury.
    -I wake up every morning and my heel is in pain for 10 minutes. No pain when walking, but if I try and get on an elliptical for even 20 minutes, it makes the condition worse the next day. I'm limited to stationary biking, rowing, and swimming for cardio.

    Studies show that average recovery time is 6 months for 75% of those who have it. With everything I'm doing I hope that my recovery time is lessened, but it's not looking good.

    As those of you who have had this know, it's mentally taxing. Especially for those that like to run. If you wake up with heel pain, I strongly advise that you get it treated ASAP. Having this condition sucks.
     
  9. Primetime

    Primetime Well-Known Member

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    Approaching 7 months. After doing extensive treatment, this is a very slow recovery process but it's coming along. Probably be another 4-5 months before I can run on it without morning pain.
     

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