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My Bench Shirt Exploded!

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by Eman7673, May 14, 2006.

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  1. badgolfer

    badgolfer Well-Known Member

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    Those are sweet!:spaz:

    I bet I can bowl in them.

    Page 4. Cant say I didnt see this coming. We wont get off this one though I bet.
     
  2. cajunman

    cajunman Well-Known Member

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    Skoorb, the problem is you think you know what you are talking about when you don't. There are probably less than 20 (or right around 20) people in the entire world who ever have benched over 713 in a shirt. Hell, at the WPC World's only ONE lifter benched over 700, and it was 704. You are not talking facts, you are talking "common knowledge" that unfortunately is NOT TRUE. Unless you are saying that being among the top 20 in the world is "pretty good, but not spectacular"...

    John Inzer was a powerlifter, 165 lb weight class I believe. National-level. Great deadlifter. Bench press was his weak lift. Everyone knew about the tight cotton t-shirt trick to get a few pounds...he experimented with different materials, and different seam locations/cuts, to get a tighter shirt. The reason the shirt advances have been the last 20 years is the material advances in the last 20 years. Bench shirts have only been around since 1983. Comparing them with the last 30 years of running technology when running technology turned the corner earlier is disingenuous.

    I've run in combat boots. I've taken the Army PT test in combat boots. If you claim that you can match your 10-mile times and marathon times in combat boots, again, pony up. Army 10-miler and Marine Corps are in October. Pick your meet and let's ante up...
     
  3. Coachese

    Coachese Well-Known Member

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    :sleep:


    ***
     
  4. Skoorb

    Skoorb Well-Known Member

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    With the world record at a thousand lbs I find it HIGHLY unlikely that only 20 people have gotten over 713 with a shirt. If that is true, I retract my point. :tucool:
    I don't know that running technology ever really turned a corner! They throw more crap into the shoes but it's of highly debateable effectiveness. That is beside the point, though.
    I've never run in them; they would make me slower. Extra weight on a show decreases performance. The only obvious advancement in shoe technology is making them lighter, but even the lightest flats decades ago were within spitting distance of the weight of flats now, so shoes havce not increased runner's speeds. I am sure that most, if not all decreases in record times for running are due to better runners, not better shoes.
     
  5. Banditfist

    Banditfist Well-Known Member

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    I have run in combat boots as well. 10 miler? I want in on that bet too. You might be able to do it for a mile, but not 10. You won't come close to your time with normal shoes.


    Cajun, you obviously have some experience with powerlifting. I have to say I agree with what you are saying. I just think that people's points of view are too different here.

    I used to work out at Kaz's gym in Auburn. I would have loved to have seen Kaz with a shirt on in those days. Funniest thing about him was that at his gym he would throw people out for doing stupid exercises or incorrect form. Funniest thing to see that happen.
     
  6. badgolfer

    badgolfer Well-Known Member

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    Did he rip up your contract too in front of everyone or did they eventually let the bandit back in. :D
     
  7. Coachese

    Coachese Well-Known Member

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    Clipped from a simliar discussion on another website. My views are EXACTLY the same however, I am not articulate enough to write this myself.

    I can understand why some people have reservations about this kind of bench technique. Maybe it's because I'm a big fan of strongman, but I like to think the reason most guys lift/are inspired by lifting is because of the implied natural power in it. Yeah, many of us want to be big, but not so we can carry around extra bodyweight-- it's because it makes us look formidable. Impressive gym feats are formidable in the same way-- you see all that weight moving in a deep squat, and there's something inherently "translatable" about it.

    What I'm getting at is that when we see "reduced range of motion" in regular gym lifts, we normally laugh our asses off, now matter how much weight is on the bar/stack. I'm not at all saying guys like Sean Lattimer and Brian Siders aren't incredibly strong--if they were to do a maximum bench press the way I do one, they'd still make me look like a little girl. It's just tough for me to get excited about a lift with a three inch ROM; I don't care what the poundage number is. It doesn't help that those silly bench shirts are added to the equation. If you have to put on a special truss that doesn't allow you to lower your arms, for no other reason than to add a few pounds, the spectacle has truly outpaced the intrinsic value. There's a reason most stonelifters don't use tacky/wear special harnesses to pick those 300 pound boulders up--because it's understood that the true strongman is strong because he can just go over there and pick the damn thing up! If safety and efficiency with the heaviest weight number is the name of the game, go rent a crane and pick up 800 pound boulders with it!



    I know, I know, powerlifting is all about the number, not some intangible definition of 'strength' or 'formidability'-- that's fine. But I think it's perfectly acceptable to believe that just chasing numbers can often dilute what's special or intrinsically impressive about a big lift.
     
  8. Skoorb

    Skoorb Well-Known Member

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    Concur. There are few debates around running shoes or golf club materials because people just don't see them and immediately think "wow, that is ridiculous!". I've come across many people who hear about bench shirts and think "wow, that is ridiculous!". Ignorance or not, that is the opinion many lay people have when they hear about them. Powerlifters don't care about those opinions, and, in turn, wearing the shirts makes regular people care even less about powerlifting.
     
  9. Bluestreak

    Bluestreak Well-Known Member

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    Great cut/paste, Coach.

    Bingo.

    -R
     
  10. jwdiho

    jwdiho Well-Known Member

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    There's only 16 members in Westside's club that bench 700+. However, I couldn't find a list of others. Kinda would think there would be over 4 more in the entire world. But still, it's a very small number.

    http://www.westside-barbell.com/elite_members.htm
     
  11. jwdiho

    jwdiho Well-Known Member

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    Did you know that sprinters and hurdlers shoes come with spikes?
    Shame on them! :p
     
  12. Fender

    Fender Well-Known Member

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    Thats exactly the way I feel. I might be able to press 450 with a bench shirt, but would that really how strong I judge myself? No. I dont walk around all day in real life with a bench shirt on. So I find a TRUE sense of strength is to do it raw baby.
     
  13. Fender

    Fender Well-Known Member

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    But do some of them put tiny springs in the soles to get a better bounce?
     
  14. Skoorb

    Skoorb Well-Known Member

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    Of course. A sprinter's time without spikes will be substantially higher. For a sprinter, their spikes are the bench presser's shirt :)
     
  15. Coachese

    Coachese Well-Known Member

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    And have for decades and decades. They were detachable though -- did you know that? Also, the spikes that you see today were invented in direct reponse to the all-weather track surfaces.

    I'm afraid I fail to see your point sir.
     
  16. jwdiho

    jwdiho Well-Known Member

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    So basically he's arguing that he doesn't care about what people lift with shirts. Fine. No one will likely change his or your opinion.

    That doesn't change the fact that benching shirts are here. They are deemed legal for now. They are used extensively in competition and they increase the weight lifted. But, everyone uses them. Your weight goes up, but so does the competition's. It still requires work, work and more work to lift 800+ pounds. The most important thing is everyone is on a relatively level playing field.

    I think you can basically cry all you want about how benching shirts are a travesty to powerlifting and soils the purity of the sport. But until they oulaw them, if you are a powerlifter(which you are not), and you compete(which you don't but the original poster does) you WILL be wearing a shirt(unless you are competing raw).

    Short of powerlifting, I think a mild bench shirt or just a tight t-shirt is still a useful thing, like a weight belt.
     
  17. jwdiho

    jwdiho Well-Known Member

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    I guess I have to be more clear.

    Running barefoot or running with spikes. Which is faster in a sprint or hurdle, sir?

    My point is that there have been advancement in shoes, sir.

    Edit- Are you going to go over to the running web sites, get on your box and decry running spikes? No, because everyone wears them and are on the same playing field. Fastest man with best technique still wins.
    Bench shirt or not. Strongest man with the best technique still wins.
    Lastest Nike golf club or not, best player with the best game wins.
    Made my point clear yet, sir?

    And my feet smell after wearing shoes all day.
    What is your point, sir?

    Ah, that was therapeutic. I'll probably regret what I just wrote, sorry. :)
     
    #77 jwdiho, May 18, 2006
    Last edited: May 18, 2006
  18. Coachese

    Coachese Well-Known Member

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    That's what happens when men wear high heels.
     
  19. jwdiho

    jwdiho Well-Known Member

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    :lol:
     
  20. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    I ran a lot more like two or three miles when I did that. (Army test is 2 miles as well, right?) I don't have any combat boots at the moment, though. Back in those days, the running shoes were a little under a pound each, and the boots were a little over two pounds each. Basically the same weight difference between running shoes and barefoot was the difference between combat boots and running shoes.

    Having to run two marathons to prove the point seems like a big deal. Especially since you have to break in the boots too. But a couple miles seems like a reasonable idea.

    Now I have a recent fastest (treadmill) mile time of 6:20 (I'm 47 so that's an honestly fast mile). Using the ratio of highest shirt bench press to highest raw bench press of (1000 / 700) = 1.43 then here is what the same ratio would imply - a time of (6:20) * 1.43 = 9:03.

    So would you agree that if I run a mile in combat boots faster than 9:03 then boots are less important in running than shirts are in bench pressing?

    If you do, I have to figure out if the gym would let me run on the treadmill in combat boots, get some boots, break them in, get good socks happening, and run the mile. Or I could run a mile each way on a road course near my house, etc., but that would be based on different times.

    I feel pretty good about running a mile under 9 minutes in boots.
     
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