1. Have you installed the new JSF Mobile app? Check out all the details here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. One account & one avatar for all of JSF. Unified login and profile. Forum alerts on the main site, and more. Check out the details here: Forum & main site unified account feature is live!
    Dismiss Notice

Muscles Gains - How to Stop

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by autumngirl, May 18, 2013.

  1. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
    Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    4
    I started my fitness program 5 months ago, I can carry heavier weight, almost double than my starting weight. However, I am gaining weight and muscles, more than I should or like.

    My training strategy was to lift 3 sets of 12/10/8 repetitions per exercise for a full body workout, my assumption is that this was high repetition to tone dowm, with no muscle mass gains. It seems that it is not the case for some reason my muscles are growing bigger, especially my legs.
    What should be my training approach if my goal is to become stronger but not necessarly bulker that I should?
     
    #1 autumngirl, May 18, 2013
    Last edited: May 18, 2013
  2. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Messages:
    16,381
    Likes Received:
    25
    If your goal is to become stronger, you need to train for performance.

    Try things like:

    80-95% of 1-RM, 2-4 reps, low to moderate volume (15-30 total reps)
    60-75% of 1-RM, 2-6 reps, high acceleration, moderate volume (20-40 reps)

    Also, don't eat at a caloric surplus.
     
  3. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
    Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    4
    If I understand correctly, I will carry 80-95% of the maximum weight for 2-4 reps, is that all?
     
  4. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    Messages:
    4,056
    Likes Received:
    11
    That is mostly going to be determined by diet. If you don't want to gain any weight, then just eat at maintenance. You probably don't want to reduce muscle gains ... but rather halt fat gains. I suspect if you lean out a bit while retaining the muscle you've gained, you will like how you look.
     
  5. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Messages:
    16,381
    Likes Received:
    25
    That's correct, although you'll repeat that for a number of sets. You won't be going to failure.

    I've generally gone with a bit higher volume, but another recommendation is to use Prilepin's Table. Here some more specific information I wrote back in 2007 or so for a martial arts / gymnastics-based sport called tricking that is nevertheless generally applicable:

    http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/blog.php?u=999

    But, like Joe said, if you don't want to gain muscle, you mainly need to get your diet under control. I don't know your more general goals or background, but, for the strength side, I've found just lifting with progressive overload is enough, although you can get fancier with your programming based on stuff I've described above and other stuff I have not. There's a whole industry devoted to increasing athletic performance, of course.
     
    #5 chicanerous, May 19, 2013
    Last edited: May 19, 2013
  6. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
    Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    4
    my thighs and calves are getting bigger combination of muscles and fat (probably related to genetics of pear/hourglass figure), how can I slim or trim them down (other than diet)?
     
  7. digitalnebula

    digitalnebula Plagiarist

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Messages:
    4,413
    Likes Received:
    2
    The only way to drop bodyfat is to tune your diet to your lifestyle. (namely eating below maintenance calories)

    Also, you can't decide to lose bodyfat in certain areas...:nope:....it comes off of everywhere as your body burns it for energy when operating at a caloric deficit.
     
  8. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
    Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    4
    I used to be skinny in my teen days then decided to gain weight through eating and exercise, unfortunately it does not always end-up as you expect it to be, some muscle gains especially in the thighs can make your appearance less favorable.
     
  9. Robert2006

    Robert2006 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,695
    Likes Received:
    0

    You're lucky enough to carry your fat in places other then your belly. This isn't a negative. At least not for most people. It's certainly a health benefit.

    Calorie balance is the only thing. Diet control is the easiest. Think about it an hour walk might burn 200 calories. That's half a plate of pasta. You can control what you put in your mouth or you can workout out ALOT.
     
  10. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
    Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    4
    It is very relative, at the end of the day, you want to feel and look your best, there must be a solution to every concern or issue. To control the calories is possible, but without the right exercise routine, muscles could just keep growing, not very favorable for ladies.
     
  11. vanderlinden

    vanderlinden Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you want to look thin rather than muscular, you need to train the way thin athletes train. Switch to endurance athlete training and diet. In particular, running. Cycling will also give you a big butt and thighs. Eat less protein, do more cardio. Don't do heavy squats or leg presses. Basically do the opposite of the advice you'll get on a bodybuilder forum!

    If you have genetic propensity to get thick, but that's not the desired result, you have to think outside the weight lifter box to achieve your desired results.

    For example, I can easily pack on muscle. Especially on my chest and arms. At one point I was up to 225 pounds at 10% body fat. However, my favorite sport is snowboarding, and my second favorite sport is cycling. Being 225 pounds does not help in either of these sports, even if it's 90% muscle. I do not need 17-18" biceps to snowboard. I had to radically change my ideas about diet and working out in order to slim down to a reasonable weight.
     
  12. autumngirl

    autumngirl Well-Known Member
    Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    4
    That sounds like a good start. I eat a lot of protein, probably more than I need, basically it is a habit and learned behavior to keep my carbohydrate intake low, with the assumption that it was the best way to stay in shape.
    How does a runner's diet look like? How would a runner train? I need guidance to start up.
     

Share This Page