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More Martial Arts Questions.

Discussion in 'General Health/Fitness & Injuries' started by TaxiTodd, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. TaxiTodd

    TaxiTodd Well-Known Member

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    Greetings,

    I figure in another 4 weeks or so my weight will be down in the 160's and I should be in good enough phisical condition to start taking some martial arts classes.

    I am rarely in any situation where I would find myself in a confrontation. Occasionaly I have someone that does not want to pay their Taxi cab Fare, but nothing too serious. If someone is going to rob me they will probabbly be in the back seat with something pointed at my head.

    What form of Martial Arts is best for defense?

    What form is best to go on the offensive?

    I heard talk of cross-training in another thread. When starting out is it best to stick with just one form?

    I am in week 13 of cutting and bulking. About 4 - 8 weeks away from hitting my goal body weight and body fat %. I am not going to go for a big bulk up after hitting my goals, but would like something to keep me focused on fitness in general. I think martial arts might be a good fit.

    I'm 34 and single with no kids, which means I have alot of free time to devote to my workouts and other activities. So if anyone has any suggestions I would appreciate your input.

    ~Todd
    St Paul, MN
     
  2. karatetricker

    karatetricker Well-Known Member

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    Asking which is the best for self-defense is an impossible question to answer. Not to mention, you will have everyone on here telling you their style is the best.

    I will tell you that the best is actually cross-training arts. No one style has it all. I know the system I study incorporates several styles (Shaolin Kempo, Kung-Fu and Jiu-Jitsu) so it is more well rounded. You would benefit well from a school that teaches a well rounded system because you will not only focus on striking, kicking OR grappling, but a good mix of everything.

    The only styles I would really stay away from if defense is a priority are the Korean kicking arts like TaeKwonDo, TangSooDo and Hapkido. Sure, they have their place and are great for certain things, but you can argue with me all day, you will not convince me they are a good choice for self defense. (And I have a black belt in TKD.)

    Feel free to contact me if you want more specific info. I've been studying MA for over 12 years and have trained in a variety of styles, so I may be able to offer you more help should you need it.
     
  3. Wilderbeast

    Wilderbeast Elite Member
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    Good advise from KarateTricker one thing i would like to add is that a good instructor can make or break a class. Try out a couple and when you go look at the senior students and decide if you want to be as good as them. If they are not up to much then chances are the instructor isnt great.

    Widers
     
  4. karatetricker

    karatetricker Well-Known Member

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    Excellent point I can't believe I forgot. The instructor is 90% of your training. No matter the style, a terrible instructor means you will hardly progress or learn in an effective manner. Whereas a great instructor can make almost any style great. It's hard to recognize the difference at first, so you may start at one school and within 4-6 months realize you need to try a different one. That is fine. There are some exceptional instructors out there, but sadly, there are as many or more exceptionally poor ones.
     
  5. dledeaux

    dledeaux Well-Known Member

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    And in any situation, regardless of self defense skill, you should just give them what they want if you think that it means you will walk away, especially where a gun is involved.

    This might be like asking what car makes the best taxi. There is no good answer.

    This could do it. The nice thing is it's very easy to set goals in MA, and there are lots of ways of proving yourself and standards to measure yourself by.
     
  6. Adam and Jess

    Adam and Jess Well-Known Member

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  7. TaxiTodd

    TaxiTodd Well-Known Member

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    I was looking into a couple of dojos in the Twin Cities.
    One of the specializes in Hwa Rang Do http://www.hwarangdomn.com/
    The instructors are younger but the facility is very nice.

    The other specializes in Kung Fu http://www.amkungfu.com/home.html
    The instructor here has more than 30 years in the martial arts, but is located in an office suite.

    I will check them out more this weekend.

    ~Todd
    St Paul, MN
     
  8. G_Man

    G_Man Well-Known Member

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    I’ve been fortunate enough to find a good dojo that teaches
    Matsubayashi Ryu (Shorin Ryu) which is primarily a striking style. The dojo's lineage can be traced back to the originator of this particular style in Okinawa. It focuses on strength, endurance and technique, (mainly kata). The head sensei has 23 years experience and is a 5th degree blackbelt. The monthly fee is only $10.00 dollars for two, hour and a half rigorous classes a week. Rank advancement is honestly earned and not paid for. I mention these things because to me they are important for finding a credible school. It may take several attempts to find a school that fits your needs, but it’s a great way to stay in shape.
     
    #8 G_Man, Oct 20, 2004
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2004
  9. PetriJR

    PetriJR Well-Known Member

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    Haven't trained it myself but I've heard that Krav Maga should be pretty good for defence. I guess it's something that's taught in the military forces of Israel and I'm pretty sure those people don't fool around.

    I might be totally wrong with that, but that's the impression I've gotten from the Krav Maga-ads in Finland.

    Ok, Google saved me, I'm not wrong: http://www.kravmaga.com/

     
  10. Wilderbeast

    Wilderbeast Elite Member
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    Love some of the etique rules on the HwaRangDo site.

    "Children who do not obey their parents CHEERFULLY may be reduced in rank!"
    Is my favourite. I wouldent have got past white belt :)
     
  11. lostmind

    lostmind Well-Known Member

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    karatetricker - what about Hwarangdo? Any opinions? They have two stages - tae soo do and then hwa rang do, right? Or am I mixing up tang soo do with tae soo do? Korean vocab is not my strong point. :)
     
  12. k3vb0

    k3vb0 Well-Known Member

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    In addition to the great advice given above regarding checking out schools and instructors, be very leery of those schools that want you to sign up right away or that try to force you into a year or more contract. I have encountered many of these schools here in Colorado, and they use the fitness club high pressure approach. A good school will not have to use this approach to entice you to join. The curriculum and the rapport the instructors have with their students should be what makes you want to join a school...not high pressure sales tactics.
     
  13. _Christopher_

    _Christopher_ Well-Known Member

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    Todd-

    Stay away from the McDojos...the ones that want you to sign up for a long contrat and are just belt mills. These are usually found at strip malls.

    Take something that combines grappling and striking. But remember that the best defense is a pair of running shoes! :P But seriously, avoiding the situation and talking your way out of it is the real victory, so that you 1) dont risk injury 2) dont have to deal with legal problems if you injure someone
     
  14. wayne

    wayne Well-Known Member

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    personally I would take muay thai and brazilian jiu jitsu or just jiu jitsu. Most because muay thai is just bad ass and if you know how to pick someone apart with leg kicks its a great feeling and brazilian jiu jitsu because if a fight goes to the ground it doesnt matter how big the other guy is because the art is ment for the smaller guy to use the larger guys strength and size against him.
     
  15. DingoWallaby

    DingoWallaby Well-Known Member

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    Seriously, though, as a martial artist ...

    If you're very concerned about having to defend yourself, become proficient with some sort of weapon. Learning to use and care for a gun is a lot easier than going to practice several times a week. For me, Judo is just plain fun, and has a side benefit of learning how to variously toss people around.

    Or, as someone put it (sorry, I don't remember who):

    "You might get mugged. And you might be hurt. And they might take your money away. If you come here, we WILL take your money every month, and we WILL hurt you."
     
  16. JMR

    JMR Well-Known Member

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    You don't fight on the ground in real life. All that will get ya is your head kicked in by somebody's buddy. Forget that grappling crap. Forget anything that teachs high kicks. All that will get ya is your nuts twisted and your ass stomped when you hit the ground.
     
  17. French Spirit

    French Spirit Well-Known Member

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    Any style that actually fights; avoid a school that never spars.
     
  18. Acliff

    Acliff Well-Known Member

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    No high kicks is sound advice.
    However your first comment has very little grounding. (groan)
    Studies show that most fights end up on the ground. At least, one person on the ground, the other person, kicking your head.
    Grappling comes into use, as you're used to fighting on the ground, whereas the other chap may not be. And there are always ways to bring standing people down to the ground, at which point, your superior groundwork can really make the other fellas life hell.

    Naturally i'm not factoring in multiple opponents, because grappling is not designed for multiple opponents at all. However, at worst, it can be a life saving knowledge.

    Even grappling streetfighters will try and stay standing for as long as possible. Its just easier to take you out with punches and kicks, but will take you to the ground if thats the best option. In this instance grappling is used as a backup option.

    I personally do taekwondo and ninjitsu. In fights, all I use is thigh kicks, stomp kicks, pushing kicks, back kicks, front kicks, standard boxing punches, and a couple of rough and ready chokes and locks, as opposed to the huge syllabus that they teach you.
    I'm starting to learn wing chun, as the pushing/sticky hands seems like an extremely good self defence system.
     

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