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Long term weight loss

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by pmrozik, Dec 9, 2011.

  1. pmrozik

    pmrozik Active Member

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    Hi All,

    I was here almost three years ago and while following a pretty strict diet and a regular exercise regimen I managed to lose over 20 lbs. I then injured my knee while jogging, followed by a domestic financial disaster which forced me to work harder and I'm back to my old weight. Something is still wrong with my knee, but I signed up for the gym again and have tried running on a treadmill twice so far - no problems, apart from shortness of breath. I'm looking for some help on long-term solutions to keep my weight down. I know that my diet is probably the most important thing I'll need to work on.

    I do have some literature on how to eat healthy and it has proven to be effective in the past, but once I do decide to go on a diet I seem to go to extremes. It becomes a grueling, tiresome process and is difficult to keep up in the long run with my busy and constantly changing schedule. Whole wheat, fruit, vegetables, low sugar content foods should all get my weight down, but it all seems so bland.

    I think my problem is quite typical for those who are overweight. I often skip breakfast, don't have any food for long periods of time and then just stuff myself in the evenings. I'm going to go ahead and do what I'd managed to do before, which is try 5 meals a day. But I've also found this: http://www.acaloriecounter.com/diet/how-many-meals-a-day-when-how-often-should-you-eat/ which says that all these "don't eat after 6PM, eat 6 meals a day, etc." ideas are all BS. I've found that if I don't eat late in the evening my weight is usually lower the next day. I mean it makes sense that whatever I'd just consumed isn't burned if I'm sleeping. There are so many different opinions and experts on the subjects that it's tough to judge what's right and what's not.

    The most important thing for me is to improve my eating habits and my eating schedule. I think I'm doing okay with exercise, but food intake has always been a problem. Given that I don't want to be a bodybuilder and I don't want to be thin but have some muscle mass - enough to feel good when I look at myself in the mirror, what should I be eating? I'm 30 by the way. Is there anyone else here who has/had a similar goal?

    TIA.
     
  2. Zilla

    Zilla Well-Known Member

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    It seems to me that you know what you need to be eating, you just don't like to because it is bland. The simple solution for that is to spice it up so you actually enjoy what you're eating. Spices don't have to be expensive and many of them are not.

    If you're looking to lose body fat and just be in shape, your plan is still going to require good eating habits. Eating 5 times a day keeps your metabolism fired all day which also keeps food binging at bay, and there is nothing wrong with eating after 6 PM. It is what a person eats at that time and beyond that can cause problems. If a person chokes down a few doughnuts with a glass of milk every night, then sits in front of the TV, then just goes to bed, yes the pudge factor is going to kick in sooner rather than later.

    Since you didn't post your workouts, nobody can tell you how much you should be eating, but if you go through the beginner stickies, there is help there so you can figure it out. If you get stuck along the way, ask for help.
     
  3. Robert2006

    Robert2006 Active Member

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    Simple thing is to eat what you like but eat less.

    Figure out your calorie/macro targets then look at what you like eating. Make the numbers work.

    I'd never eat something because it's good for me. Or because it's the right thing. I would go nuts. Now I'm lucky to like brocolli and a lot of the other "good" foods but I'm sure there are things you like that are good for you.

    I'll eat pasta,pizza and many other things that people will consider evil. I just don't eat too much. Anything in moderation is okay.
     
  4. pmrozik

    pmrozik Active Member

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    Thanks a lot for your input guys. My goal this month is to work out six times a week for an hour and alternate between cardio and weight training. So far I've only managed to hit the gym 3-4 times a week for the past two weeks, and I really wasn't seeing the results that I'd expected. Then I went back to reading about how I should be eating and have tried to keep my meals more frequent and small. I've immediately noticed the weight difference.

    As far as food goes, I prepared baked salmon and asparagus with white rice. Brown rice always seems to be a bit too hard.

    Robert, it seems that there's a lot of good and tasty food out there which is healthy as well. I suddenly started noticing veggies at the supermarket.

    Anyway, thanks again for your input.
     
  5. Zilla

    Zilla Well-Known Member

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    Glad to hear that you're seeing improvement. Diet is really is 80% of the whole picture.

    To Robert's point, it is okay to have those tasty things. Unless you have to reason to keep your diet really tight all the time, there is no reason not to have cheat meal if you feel you need one. Just make sure you're not cheating more than being in compliance.

    I live by the 95% food compliance rule. By doing this it keeps a dreaded "forbidden food list" from developing in my brain. More often than not, I can go for weeks without a cheat as I'm not constantly nit-picking with my myself over what I can or cannot have.

    You'll find a way that works for you, but I don't do well with micromanaging every little bit of food that goes in my mouth so I don't do it. A few extra grains of rice or a extra ounce of sweet potato is not going to cause major damage.
     
  6. Robert2006

    Robert2006 Active Member

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    I don't believe in calling it cheating. I just make it fit my macros. Depends on the person. Some people can't have a little of something and end up eating the whole box. But if you can control your amounts anything can be made to work.

    I think Mastover has posted eating almost anything he wants.
     
  7. HevyMetal

    HevyMetal Well-Known Member

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    Usually people eat a lot more carbs than they think. Also saturated fats.

    Nothing wrong with either of those in the correct proportions.

    If you want to lose weight......eating simple junk carbs and processed sweets plus high fat intake within four hours of going to bed will kill any weightloss mechanisms until you wake up.

    If the six meals a day you eat also contain tons of junky fats,junky sweets and "fast" carbs.......you are putting a brake on weight loss.Even if you consider the portions of these to be not too bad.

    If you have a job or are active enough throughout the day you'll need SOME carbs.....but this will differ from person to person depending on their activity level daily.

    Simple sugars and sweets and junk carbs are weight loss killers because they introduce a regime to interfere with weightloss when they are ingested.

    Protein takes more caloreis to burn in the body than sugar or fats, and it raises the metabolism.
    Sugar and fats together raises Tri-Glycerides.....not good.

    Today the average person is an absolute sugar junky compared to 150 years ago. Too much food is marketed to taste sweet.

    Do we know better?.....I dunno...we don't know any other life, really.
    We've been hit with this sh*t since the day we were born.

    It was around the year 1900 that Refined Sugar went into Mega production.

    Refined Sugar is a drug.......aimed at our consumption 24/7.

    If you think Sugar isn't a drug......try cutting out all food items that contain Sugar or processed Sugar....and see if you don't experience a "withdrawal" downer.

    Sugar and weightloss do not mix.

    The natural sugars in fruit are a different story.However too much Fructose can be quickly fattening, because it is processed differently by the body than Refined Sugar.

    There's lots of "clean" food around that tastes good...
     
  8. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't matter when you eat or how many meals you eat. The 24 hour "fat balance" is what matters most. And it doesn't matter if this fat oxidation is during sleeping or waking hours. If you were eating less during the day and more at night, then fat oxidation will be greater during the day. If you do the opposite, then fat oxidation will be greater during the night. After 24 hours the body has no idea which half of the day more effectively produced a net gain, net loss, or maintenance with fat balance.

    Using myself as an example, there have been numerous instances (and this includes pre contest, when my BF levels had to get to ultra low numbers) when I would have a big meal just before bed consisting of carbs, fats, and protein. For my last couple of shows I was basically not eating during the day at work, and when I came home at night, I'd be eating and nibbling for about five hours straight right up until bed time.
    For my last show I was seeing a girl I fancied and when I spent some quality time with her (if you know what I'm saying :cool: ) and she left to go home, I'd eat right till bed time, finishing off with a big peanut butter, banana, honey sandwich, and two oranges or peaches. Fruit is also my preferred carb source due to fructose' anabolic signaling effect on the liver.

    As long as you meet your macro and calorie numbers by days end, it makes no difference when you eat. This goes for fat loss or muscle building. Nutrient timing is only going to be important around the training bout, and this is also individual specific depending upon the intensity of effort and age of the lifter. For example, the 23 year old trainee will require a different pre and post workout nutrition protocol than his 43 year old counterpart, while the 63 year old trainee will need something else to be effective, whether their goals are muscle building or fat loss, or both.
     

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