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Limit on Cardio?

Discussion in 'Fat Loss/Cutting' started by Blinkbear, Sep 27, 2006.

  1. Blinkbear

    Blinkbear Well-Known Member

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    I did a search and couldn't find an absoilute definitive answer to this question. Is there a point where too much cardio can hurt?

    Like if I were to do 45 mins of fasted morning cardio and then later that day do another 45 mins. obviously not fasted. Would it be beneficial..ie the more the better? Would it speed up results?
     
  2. crupiea

    crupiea Well-Known Member

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    I am by no means an expert but here is what I have noticed. If you do a ton of cardio, you will burn fat. If you do more than unless you are eating enough to sustain it, you will start to burn muscle. I have my program set up to do cardio one day, weight the next, and it goes on and onlike that. If I switched to cardio everyday, I would have to change my diet to allow for more calories, ontherwise the extra would be muscle.
    You can do more but you will have to experiment with your calories so you don't waste your time. Have fun.
     
  3. wh0rume

    wh0rume Senior Member

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    There is no definite answer to your question - it depends on so many factors.


    If you're fasted, or your glycogen levels happen to be low, it's not a good idea to go for too long (over 45min), and keep it 65-75% of your maxhr.

    But if your diet is rich in carbohydrates and your glycogen is full, or if you're eating carbs during the workout - you can go for as long as you want, and as high intensity as you want.
    Then after this, your body needs to adapt to higher intensities, and/or longer durations, otherwise your body is going to release free radicals and other bad hormones (excess cortisol) that are catabolic.

    for example, even if you're eating well while running a marathon or cycling a century ride - it will still be bad because you havnt properly trained and let your body adapt to the added duration/intensity.



    im bad at explaining things so im sorry about the shitty writing
     
  4. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    wh0areume gave pretty much the correct answer for you.

    Just something to think about:

    [​IMG]

    This guy had a daily volume of exercise which was surprisingly high even for Olympic athletes. Doesn't seem to have whittled his legs down to sticks, though.
     
  5. SwoleCat

    SwoleCat Well-Known Member

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    I currently do cardio twice a day, everyday, to hold my ripped condition that I attained for my professional photoshoot that was held last month on August 5th. I know what I have to do in order to preserve my lean mass, because I've been doing this for a plethora of years and I've found what works for me and I know what I need to do/not do. As stated above, if your nutrition is not impeccable to support all of the activity and encourage adipose tissue to be burned and lean muscle preserved, then it can get really messy very quickly.

    ~SC~
     
  6. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    It really ought to be mentioned that recent research shows that if you are really lean, it's harder and harder to get a lot of fat calories, and if you are pretty fat, then it's easier. So if you need to maintain a really low body fat percentage, then you have to be really careful. But if you are comfortable with a higher body fat percentage then you can be a lot less careful because it's easier for you to access fat calories. So one of the tricks that athletes can use to support high levels of cardio is to avoid being too lean during a lot of the training.
     
  7. SwoleCat

    SwoleCat Well-Known Member

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    I'm afraid don't understand the above at all, sorry. :confused:

    Especially the part that reads, "recent research shows that if you are really lean, it's harder and harder to get a lot of fat calories".

    Have no idea what that is supposed to mean. Harder to get fat calories? This is suggesting lean people not having the ability to eat fat? I don't get it. In addition, I don't know why any athlete would want to use a "trick" as you called it of not being lean during training when he/she is doing high levels of cardio. That totally defeats the purpose of doing high levels of cardio in the first place.

    In any event, as I said above, I am able to stay ripped all the time with my dietary approach and cardio/weight training having found what works for me. That is the best course of action for anyone no matter what the goal, that being "find what works for you". For me it's actually very simplistic, with the biggest key being consistency.

    ~SC~
     
  8. BreakingPoint

    BreakingPoint Well-Known Member

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    SC, are you doing both sessions fasted and at 45 minutes?
     

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