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Just finished a killer chest/back day!

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by Ranger17, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Ranger17

    Ranger17 Well-Known Member

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    I feel so good...sore as hell...but so good. Lifted to muscle failure, reminds me of the good 'ol days in the Army! Just felt good,thought I'd share my endorphine (sp?) high :jumping:
    J
     
  2. AniMe

    AniMe Well-Known Member

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    Great, it sure feels good :D Took a bit easier session today but nevertheless it feels great ;)

    By the way .. "Lifted to muscle failure"... Ain't that like... Dangerous and does not promote growth? :O
     
  3. Ranger17

    Ranger17 Well-Known Member

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    actually I did a few sets of good 'ol push-ups, to MF, and I haven't done that in about 4 years, and it's not a recurring thing....kinda just for good ol memories
    should have clarified that...but my arms were a shakin...haha
    J
     
  4. Jono

    Jono Well-Known Member

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    if you want to promote lean muscle growth.. 4-6 reps to failure is essential.

    doing exercises where you do "set" reps with lighter weights is ALMOST useless and a waste of time. high reps "fatigues" muscle tissue.. it doesnt "overload" them

    fatigue = "not as much muscle growth"

    overload = "muscle growth"
     
  5. Jonesy

    Jonesy Well-Known Member

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    I totally disagree!!! All bodies are different, therefore everyone is going to respond to different types of workouts. I've been doing workouts with the same people for years and we all do our own thing. One friend of mine has had basically the same style of workout for over 10 years. Tell his 21 inch biceps that high volume, high rep training doesn't work. Now I'm not bashing the Max-OT workout at all. I've been a powerlifter for years and the Max-OT is similiar to what I have done, and I got very strong. But I never added size like most of my friends did.

    I also think there is a misconception with the whole "lighter weight, higher rep" theory. I don't think people understand that when doing a set of 10, the weight sould be enough so that you can barely get that last rep. If you can do more then 10 reps, the weight is too light.

    Most importantly, you need to find a workout that not only works for you, but something that you also enjoy. I'm sure that Ranger will agree with me on this, but I was in some of the best shape of my life when I was in the Army! It was all about reps and miles, no Max-OT training there.
     
  6. Tiger King

    Tiger King Well-Known Member

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    I kind of agree and disagree...I mean, we're all human, and there are going to be things that work for all of us, no matter what.

    But I have a bodybuilding friend who is 198 lbs. of pure muscle (the guy has less fat on his abs than I have in my freaking hand) and he does reps of around 8-10.

    I think..There are programs, or guidelines, which can universally apply to us, but that they need to be slightly tweaked depending on our body since we are very similar but not 100% identical.

    I guess to some extent, both of your arguments are right
     

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