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JSF Glossary

Discussion in 'Technical' started by gravityhomer, Nov 23, 2005.

  1. gravityhomer

    gravityhomer Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

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    Okay, this has been a long time coming. This is a first crack at it. Please everyone give it a read through and point out typos and down right errors. I'm sure there are some. Also please suggest things to add. I am still working on links for various ones, like HIT and MAX-OT please suggest some. Thanks. :tu:

    List of contributors:
    1FastGTX
    Chicanerous
    Guava
    Wh0areume
    The Abdominal Snowman
    Deadbeat dancer
    Canada
    Wilderbeast


    1RM = 1 Rep Max

    3 day split, 4 day split, 5 day split, X day split = describing a weightlifting routine where exercises for the whole body are separated over 3, 4, 5 or X days.

    Abduction = movement away from the central axis of the body.

    Abductor = Muscle used to pull a body part away from the central axis of the body.

    Absolute Failure = inability to perform more repetitions and sustain a load based on concentric, eccentric, and isometric strength

    Absolute strength = strength in relation to the weight lifted

    Adduction = movement towards the central axis of the body.

    Adductor = Muscle used to pull a body part toward the central axis of the body.

    Aerobic = Prolonged, moderate-intensity work that uses up oxygen at or below the level at which your cardio respiratory (heart-lung) system can replenish oxygen in the working muscles. Aerobic literally means with oxygen, and it is the only type of exercise which burns body fat to meet its energy needs. Bodybuilders engage in aerobic workouts to develop additional cardio respiratory fitness, as well as to burn off excess body fat to achieve peak contest muscularity. Common aerobic activities in-clude running, cycling, swimming, dancing, and walk-ing. Depending on how vigorously you play them, most racquet sports can also be aerobic exercise. (*courtesy of bodybuilding.com)

    Anaerobic = Exercise of much higher intensity than aerobic work, which uses up oxygen more quickly than the body can replenish it in the working muscles. Anaerobic exercise eventually builds up a significant oxygen debt that forces an athlete to terminate the exercise session rather quickly. Anaerobic exercise (the kind of exercise to which bodybuilding training belongs) burns up glycogen (muscle sugar) to supply its energy needs. Fast sprinting is a typical anaerobic form of exercise. (*courtesy of bodybuilding.com)

    Antagonist = Muscle that relaxes or stretches during the performance of a movement

    ATG Squat = common name for a full squat

    Bands = long bands of continuous stretchable rubber used to gradually increase or decrease resistance throughout an exercise's ROM; unlike chains, when attached to a bar, they resist movement, actively accelerating it during the eccentric and decelerating it during the concentric.

    BB = Barbell

    BCAA = Branched chain amino acids. see here http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bcaa.html

    Beyond Failure = the use of forced repetitions to continue lifting a weight

    BF = Body Fat

    BF% = percentage of body mass that is fat

    BFFM = Burn the fat, feed the muscle, Tom Venuto's book, http://www.freedomfly.net/Articles/A...id/marcd10.htm, http://www.burnthefat.com/

    BFL = Body-for-LIFE http://www.bodyforlife.com/

    BFM = body fat mass typically in pounds or kilograms

    BMI = body mass index, a tabulated method of determining a healthy weight for a person that doctors use. BMI = weight in kilograms / [(height in meters) (height in meters)] and in
    English units BMI = 703 x weight in pounds/ [(height in inches)(height in inches)], http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi/...lt-formula.htm, http://www.hsiacfit.com/BMICalculator.aspx

    BMR = Basal Metabolic Rate http://michaelandkendra.com/BMRCALC/bmrcalc.htm
    Bodybuilding = the manipulation of muscular size, body-fat, and muscular balance for aesthetics-based competition
    Bodyweight Training = using the body's own weight as resistance, while either increasing volume or using progressively harder exercises to overload the muscles

    BOR = Bent Over Rows

    BPM = Beats Per Minute

    Bulking = focusing on building muscle while minimizing fat gain. Typically involves eating more calories than you burn and performing less cardio. Phrases, "I'm bulking.", "I love to bulk, because I eat all the time.", "I love scotch." http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/showthread.php?t=51

    Bumper Plates = thick cylindrical disks of rubber that have hole in the center so that they can be loaded onto a barbell -- often brightly colored. Used in Olympic lifting, they allowed a barbell to be safely dropped from a high height without destroying the floor. Common increments are 25, 20, 15, and 10 kilograms.

    C = Carbohydrates

    Casein = protein found in milk

    CEE = Creatine Ethyl Ester http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/cee.html

    Chains = lengths of heavy chain used to gradually increase resistance throughout an exercise's ROM; unlike bands, when attached to a bar, the chains do not resist movement.

    Chalk = Chalk, or lifting chalk, is basically used for bettering ones grip on a piece of weightlifting equipment. One would take the chalk and rub it in his or her hands to provide a firmer grip around, for example, a barbell. Some also like to rub the chalk on their traps and the fronts of their shirts during squatting movements. Chalk is sometimes banned from many large chain gyms, as it can be messy and the staff becomes irritated with it being all over the barbells. Usually you will only find chalk allowed in smaller gyms and/or power-lifting friendly locations.

    Chin-up = a pull-up using a supinated grip

    Clean Bulk = a bulking diet which is supposedly designed to gain very lean muscle mass while attempting to keep fat gain as minimal as possible. A clean bulk is usually fairly strict and has little cheat meals. A clean bulk is optimal for those who tend to gain fat easily.

    Close to Failure = lifting within 1-3 reps of failure or sustaining a load within 1-3 seconds of failure

    CNS = the central nervous system

    Concentric = movement that shortens or contracts a muscle under tension

    Concentric Failure = inability to perform more repetitions based on concentric strength

    Creatine = a type of protein that is consumed to aid in maximizing weightlifting gains. It is found in natural food sources, although the claim is that we generally do not eat enough of it. http://www.absolute-creatine.com/

    Cutting = focusing on reducing body fat usually while minimizing muscle loss. Typically this involves eating fewer calories than you use and performing more cardio. Phrase - "I'm on a cut." or "I am currently cutting."

    DB = Dumbbell

    Delts = deltoid muscles aka shoulder muscles, separated into front, side and rear.

    Dextrose = the simplest form of sugar, it can be directly absorbed by the body without being broken down by stomach acid.

    Dip belt = a belt with a length of chain attached to each end. The chain is threaded through plates and reattached to the belt. It is then worn around the waist, allowing the weights to
    hang between the legs and adding resistance to bodyweight exercises such as pull-ups or dips.

    Dirty Bulk = a bulking diet in which the trainee is much more relaxed about cheat meals and does a lot of force-feeding to put away the calories. A dirty bulk will sometimes include much more Burger King than a clean bulk, and is not generally recommended, except MAYBE for the very ectomorphic bodytypes or the teenager who is just starting out and trying to pack on the mass, but even then it still isn't considered optimal over a cleaner diet.

    Diuretics = herbal pills and sometimes prescription drugs used to remove excess water from the body, usually used prior to bodybuilding shows. Most diuretics are considered to be quite harmful to one's health especially if not used responsibly or used too often.

    DL = Dead lift

    DOMS = Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, Phrase - "I'm still suffering from some killer DOMS from my last leg workout."

    Drying Out = A process, usually undergone by competing bodybuilders or models, in which you try to get rid of the last bits of water in your body. This is usually done through limiting of fluid intake, reduction in salt, sweating a lot, and sometimes diuretics.

    ECA Stack = a mixture of ephedrine, caffeine, and aspirin. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECA_stack

    Eccentric = movement that lengthens a muscle under tension

    ETS = Extreme training support, a recovery supplement by AtLargeNutrition.

    F = Fat

    Failure = common shortening of the term "concentric failure"

    Fatigue = inability to perform more repetitions or sustain a load based on factors other than muscular strength

    Forced Repetition = lifting too much weight using a spotter's help

    Fractional Plates = plates that come in increments smaller than 2.5 pounds. Common increments are 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and 1 pounds.

    Full Squat = squatting past parallel, often until the hams touch calves

    GI = Glycemic Index, a number that indicates how quickly a carbohydrate brakes down in your body and enters the blood stream. http://www.glycemicindex.com/

    Giant Set = a series of more than three exercises performed with little or no rest in between them, but usually with a rest period of a couple minutes in between each giant set. Giant sets can be performed by combining two antagonistic muscle groups or with one muscle group. An example giant set might be: 1)Bent-Over Rows, immediately followed by 2)Bench Presses, immediately followed by 3)Military Presses, immediately followed by 4)Barbell Curls, immediately followed by 5)Cable Pushdowns. Rest 3 minutes and do the entire sequence again.

    GL = Glycemic Load, a number that takes into account the glycemic index and the typical serving size of the food.

    Hammer grip = alternate name for a parallel grip, popularized by hammer curls

    Hams = Hamstring muscles, the ones on the back of your thighs.

    HIIT = High Intensity Interval Training, a type of cardio where there are short periods of high energy expenditure alternated with periods of low intensity where you rest. The idea is that you get an intense workout in a shorter period of time. Your body believes it is working at the high intensity the entire time. Please read a lot more about this before you do it. http://www.musclemedia.com/training/hiit.asp

    HIT = High Intensity Training, a type of weight lifting where you work the entire body over several exercises in a single weight lifting session. The idea is to minimize the number of sets for each exercise and the rest period between each exercise. http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/s...ad.php?t=11048

    HR = Heart Rate. Usually measured in beats per minute.

    HST = Hypertrophy Specific Training

    JSF = John Stone Fitness http://www.johnstonefitness.com/

    JSFF = John Stone Fitness Forums. Although this is never used, people just say JSF.

    JSFers = Forum members.

    Isometric Failure = inability to sustain a load based on muscular strength

    KB = kettlebell

    Lats = latissimus dorsi muscles, the muscles on your back directly beneath your arm pits. They often give people the appearance of wings when they are flexed.

    LBM = Lean Body Mass in pounds or kilograms.

    Lifting Straps = Wrapped around your hands and the barbell, dumbbells, or machine's handles, these devices allow you to hold on to a weight that may prove too heavy for your grip to allow. Mostly used in some power movements such as bent over barbell rows, these straps allow you to continue with heavy sets when your grip might give out.

    LISS = Low Intensity Steady State, a type of cardio where your heart rate is kept at about 75% of your maximum heart rate and this supposedly is a good condition for fat loss.

    Load = to add weight

    Macronutrient = protein, fat or carbohydrates. All food has some amount of these three.

    Macronutrient ratio = following a system where you attempt to eat a certain ratio of macronutrients. Like 40:40:20, which indicates 40% of your calories from protein, 40% from carbs and 20% from fat.

    Maintenance = eating and exercising in such a way that you maintain your body fat and muscle mass. Phrase - "Maintenance is so boring."

    MAX-OT = Maximum Overload Training, a type of weightlifting where you focus on higher weight and lower repetitions. The concept is to quickly progress your muscles to the point where they are being heavily worked and stay there to maximize strength gains. Read a lot about it before you do it. http://www.johnstonefitness.com/misc/MAX-OT.pdf

    MHR = Maximum Heart Rate

    Mixed grip = using both a supinated and pronated grip

    MRP = Meal Replacement Powder. This is basically a meal replacement drink. Many people choose to use these and find it to be of utmost importance especially considering the convenience factor. Instead of making 6 complete food meals per day, many will choose to eat only 4 whole food meals and drink 2 MRPs. The benefit is obvious in terms of convenience, but many consider the liquid delivery to be of importance during certain times such as post-workout and breakfast. There are many premade MRPs on the market, including Optican, Myoplex, and others. Still, some prefer to make their own MRPs by using a protein powder and some simple ingredients, for example Nitrean, eggs, egg whites, heavy whipping cream, natural peanut butter, and fruit.

    Myositis = Muscular soreness due to inflammation that often Occurs 1-2 days after unaccustomed exercise. (*courtesy of bodybuilding.com)

    Negative = a common name for an eccentric movement

    Nitrean = a protein powder by AtLargeNutrition

    Nuttin But A Peanut = a term used by Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman during his training for psyching up purposes. Coleman is known for lifting with incredibly heavy weights and he often jokes about the weight being light and the workout being easy. His phrase "Nuttin' but a peanut" is seen quite often in bodybuilding forums.

    Obliques = muscles on the sides of your abs

    Olympic Lifting = the development of maximum relative strength on snatches and cleans & jerks for weight-class based competition

    Opticen = a protein/carb supplement by AtLargeNutrition

    Overhand grip = common name for a pronated grip

    Overload = increasing resistance beyond what the body has experienced in the short past; this is done by weight progression (adding more weight), exercise progression (using a harder exercise), or volume progression (doing more repetitions). Increasing time under resistance will also produce overload
    Over-under grip = alternate name for a mixed grip

    P = Protein

    Parallel grip = common name for a semi-supinated grip

    Parallel Squat = squatting until an imaginary line drawn between the knee and the hip joint is parallel (horizontal) to the floor

    Pecs = pectoral muscles, the muscles in your chest

    Plates = thin cylindrical disks of metal, sometimes coated with rubber, that have a hole in the center so that they can be loaded onto a barbell. Common increments are 45, 35, 25, 10, 5, and 2.5 pounds.

    Portions or Portion Rule = This is a way of eating your food without being too specific with calories or macro-nutrient ratios. Some consider it popularized highly by Bill Phillips of the Body-for-LIFE fame, as his diet was structured around utilizing this approach as opposed to being too specific with counting grams and numbers. However, it has been around for quite some time, as even Arnold Schwarzenegger discusses going this route in his Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding. Phillips' idea was to count a portion of food as approximately the size of your clenched fist. In his teachings one would eat one portion of protein and one portion of carbohydrates for each of his/her six meals of the day, and having one portion of vegetables in at least one of those six meals. However this portion rule could still be applied in a variety of styles (6 protein portions per day, 3 carb portions per day, 3 fat portions per day, for example). The portion rule is utilized still by many more advanced bodybuilders too, particularly during a time of layoff or maintenance, as it can be simple but still effective in eating clean and healthy. The theory is that your macros and calories usually balance out fairly well by the end of the day, provided you are being honest with your portion sizes (in other words, a 100 pound female should not eat portions the size of the hands of a 300 pound male powerlifter).

    Positive = a common name for a concentric movement

    Powerlifting = a type of competitive weightlifting which features three lifts: squat, bench press, and deadlift. Powerlifting competitors are divided by weight classes and are both men and women. Powerlifting workouts are generally a little bit different than bodybuilding workouts though many bodybuilders find it quite optimal to use many powerlifting techniques in their training.

    Powerlifting = the development of maximum absolute strength on squats, deadlifts, and bench presses for weight-class based competition

    Priority Principle = Performing an exercise or working a body-part first in a weekly routine or within a workout in order to be unfatigued and maximally recovered from the last training session. Generally, lagging body-parts or weak movements or exercises are prioritized as this allows you to work with a greater intensity than when you are fatigued or under-recovered. To prioritize a body-part within a weekly routine, you would schedule its day immediately after the longest rest period you have between training sessions.

    Pronated grip = palms facing away from the body

    Pull-up = a pull-up using a pronated grip

    PWO = Post Work Out, phrase - "I'm going to go chug my PWO shake."

    Quads = Quadriceps muscles, the ones that make up the front of your thighs.

    Rack = a stand that holds weights. "To rack a weight" is to put it on a stand. Weight can also be racked on the body, as in a squat or clean.

    Raw = lifting without the use of any aids such as straps, belts, or wraps.

    Relative strength = strength in relation to the ratio of the weight lifted to the lifter's body weight

    Reps = # of repetitions for an exercise like pushups or bench press. There is no rest between repetitions. A group of reps is called a Set. Phrase - "I do 4 sets of 8 reps each."

    Resistance training = the development of muscular strength or size using any method that puts a muscle under tension and progressively overloads it

    ROM = Range of Motion

    Semi-supinated grip = palms facing each other

    Set = a certain number of repetitions with no rest makes up a set. People typically rest for 1-2 minutes between Sets.

    Skinny fat = a term to describe someone who has overall low body weight and small dimensions but they still have visible fat with no muscle definition. Usually happens due to a lack of resistance training.

    SLDL = Stiff Legged Deadlift

    SQ = Squat

    Stack = the combining of two or more supplements into a single serving

    Strongman training = walking, loading, lifting, pulling, throwing, holding, or pressing unconventional (cars, children, anchors, sand bags, etc.) or natural objects (stones, logs, etc.) in competition in regards to time, distance (height), or volume

    Supersets = There are different variations, but basically you go from a set of one exercise to another one that is similar but different than the first with no rest in between. Read links for more http://www.freedomfly.net/Articles/T.../training1.htm, http://www.muscleblitz.com/supersets.htm

    Supinated grip = palms facing the body

    Supplements = anything that isn't actual food. Usually consists of pills, powder, liquid or what not.

    TDEE = Total daily energy expenditure, the total number of calories burned during the day including cardio, weightlifting, just being alive.

    Total = powerlifting term: the sum of a lifter's tested 1-RM squat, deadlift, and bench press usually accompanied by the lifter's bodyweight at the time of competition

    Traps = trapezius muscle on either side of your neck. Gives you that thick neck look.

    Triset = Similar to supersets, where one does two exercises back-to-back with no rest in between, trisets are just three sets done back-to-back.

    Underhand grip = common name for a supinated grip

    Unload = to remove weight

    Unweight = to add negative resistance. The assisted pull-up or dip machine exerts an upward force that cancels out part of the downward force of your bodyweight, allowing you to temporarily weigh less so that you are able to perform the movement; the machine provides negative resistance, unweighting you. This can also be done with bands.

    Volume = the total number of repetitions performed in a given time period or workout

    Water weight = a term used to describe a sudden increase in weight due to eating salty, greasy food. Your body holds onto additional water due to the increased salt in you. Also when first eating clean after eating salty foods you can see a sudden drop in weight which is usually attributed to the loss of water. Phrase - "I've already dropped 3 pounds in one day, but it is probably mostly water weight."

    Weight-training = the development of muscular strength or size in the noncompetitive environment

    Whey = a type of protein that is typically used in powder form to make shakes or as an additive to food. It's also in a most protein bars.

    WWJSD = What would John Stone Do? a statement inspired by John Stone's mythical ability to turn an initial lackluster workout attitude into a kick ass weight lifting session filled with personal bests.
     
    #1 gravityhomer, Nov 23, 2005
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2006
  2. John Stone

    John Stone Every day is Leg Day
    Staff Member Owner

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    Good job, GH. I'm going to sticky this. Edit/update as needed.
     
  3. gravityhomer

    gravityhomer Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

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    sweet :cool: , I'm sure there's a lot more to add, so suggestions from others would be great.
     
  4. Dancer

    Dancer Well-Known Member

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    Good post Gravityhomer, and as for as i can see only the one spelling error. :tu:
     
  5. 1FastGTX

    1FastGTX Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

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    If you need help with definitions let me know, it's late and I'm just throwing out some from memory...

    I'm leaving out actual exercises cause that would add like 13423453635632798 more definitions (if we're going to include exercises I will definitely help, but it's going to take forever!).

    JSF (!!!)
    Overload
    Progressive Resistance
    Progressive Overload
    Glycogen
    Forced Reps
    Drop Sets
    Burnouts
    Pyramid
    Maxing Out
    EZ Curl Bar
    Dip Belt
    Box (Box Squats)

    Lifting Straps - Wrapped around your hands and the barbell, dumbbells, or machine's handles, these devices allow you to hold on to a weight that may prove too heavy for your grip to allow. Mostly used in some power movements such as bent over barbell rows, these straps allow you to continue with heavy sets when your grip might give out.

    Chalk - Chalk, or lifting chalk, is basically used for bettering ones grip on a piece of weightlifting equipment. One would take the chalk and rub it in his or her hands to provide a firmer grip around, for example, a barbell. Some also like to rub the chalk on their traps and the fronts of their shirts during squatting movements. Chalk is sometimes banned from many large chain gyms, as it can be messy and the staff becomes irritated with it being all over the barbells. Usually you will only find chalk allowed in smaller gyms and/or power-lifting friendly locations.

    Chains
    Bands

    Portions or Portion Rule - This is a way of eating your food without being too specific with calories or macro-nutrient ratios. Some consider it popularized highly by Bill Phillips of the Body-for-LIFE fame, as his diet was structured around utilizing this approach as opposed to being too specific with counting grams and numbers. However, it has been around for quite some time, as even Arnold Schwarzenegger discusses going this route in his Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding. Phillips' idea was to count a portion of food as approximately the size of your clenched fist. In his teachings one would eat one portion of protein and one portion of carbohydrates for each of his/her six meals of the day, and having one portion of vegetables in at least one of those six meals. However this portion rule could still be applied in a variety of styles (6 protein portions per day, 3 carb portions per day, 3 fat portions per day, for example). The portion rule is ulitized still by many more advanced bodybuilders too, particularly during a time of layoff or maintenance, as it can be simple but still effective in eating clean and healthy. The theory is that your macros and calories usually balance out fairly well by the end of the day, provided you are being honest with your portion sizes (in other words, a 100 pound female should not eat portions the size of the hands of a 300 pound male powerlifter).

    Vaccumes
    Treadmill
    Elliptical
    Recumbant Bike
    Stairclimber
    Spot / Spotter
    BF / BF%age / Bodyfat
    Pro/Carb and Pro/Fat
    Fiber

    Preworkout - This term is usually used to describe what one eats (or drinks) prior to training, be it weightlifting or cardio work. For the most part the general rule of thumb is to consume a moderate protein selection as well as a moderate carbohydrate selection, yet much debate does exist on the types of each to consume. Some prefer a light meal roughly 30 minutes prior to training, such as a liquid protein and simple carbohydrate offering (whey protein powder and dextrose or maltodextrin), some prefer a meal roughly one hour before training (a small serving of chicken with a small serving of oats), and many trainees prefer a light offering of carbs such as a small apple or another piece of fruit. Many people choose this time to also include a stimulant and other supplements such as caffeine, ephedra, and even creatine during this time.

    (This should be gone into more detail about WHY one chooses various things, such as carbs Preworkout, but I'm too lazy now. :))

    MRP - Meal Replacement Powder. This is basically a meal replacement drink. Many people choose to use these and find it to be of utmost importance especially considering the convenience factor. Instead of making 6 complete food meals per day, many will choose to eat only 4 whole food meals and drink 2 MRPs. The benefit is obvious in terms of convenience, but many consider the liquid delivery to be of importance during certain times such as post-workout and breakfast. There are many premade MRPs on the market, including Optican, Myoplex, and others. Still, some prefer to make their own MRPs by using a protein powder and some simple ingredients, for example Nitrean, eggs, egg whites, heavy whipping cream, natural peanut butter, and fruit.

    Heavy Duty - There are likely various definitions for this term but in this respect we're discussing Mike Mentzer's training system (see also HIT, Ellington Darden, and Arthur Jones). Mentzer worked for Jones and with Darden for a number of years before devising and popularizing his own (yet similar) take on HIT. It's quite similar to Darden's method, but includes even less volume and longer layoffs. Mentzer discussed some of his trainees going over 14 days in between workouts! Heavy Duty is criticized by many for it's possible inability to apply to the mindset of the majority of trainees, as Mentzer discusses a "zone" one must reach which seems almost impossible. It's roots and science are quite interesting and do make a lot of sense, but being able to apply it is the part where many seem to feel it falls short.

    Static Contraction
    Rest-Pause
    Saturated
    Unsaturated (etc.)
    Pump

    [highlight]Aerobic - Prolonged, moderate-intensity work that uses up oxygen at or below the level at which your cardiorespiratory (heart-lung) system can replenish oxy-gen in the working muscles. Aerobic literally means with oxygen, and it is the only type of exercise which burns body fat to meet its energy needs. Bodybuilders engage in aerobic workouts to develop additional cardiorespiratory fitness, as well as to burn off excess body fat to achieve peak contest muscularity. Common aerobic activities in-clude running, cycling, swimming, dancing, and walk-ing. Depending on how vigorously you play them, most racquet sports can also be aerobic exercise. (*courtesy of bodybuilding.com)[/highlight]

    [highlight]Anerobic - Exercise of much higher intensity than aerobic work, which uses up oxygen more quickly than the body can replenish it in the working muscles. Anaerobic exercise eventually builds up a significant oxygen debt that forces an athlete to terminate the exercise session rather quickly. Anaerobic exercise (the kind of exercise to which bodybuilding training belongs) burns up glycogen (muscle sugar) to supply its energy needs. Fast sprinting is a typical anaerobic form of exercise. (*courtesy of bodybuilding.com)[/highlight]

    Anabolic

    Triset - Similar to supersets, where one does two exercises back-to-back with no rest in between, trisets are just three sets done back-to-back.

    Compound Set

    [highlight]Giant Set - a series of more than three exercises performed with little or no rest in between them, but usually with a rest period of a couple minutes in between each giant set. Giant sets can be performed by combining two antagonistic muscle groups or with one muscle group. An example giant set might be: 1)Bent-Over Rows, immediately followed by 2)Bench Presses, immediately followed by 3)Military Presses, immediately followed by 4)Barbell Curls, immediately followed by 5)Cable Pushdowns. Rest 3 minutes and do the entire sequence again.[/highlight]

    Circut Training
    Partial Reps
    Form
    Superslow
    Metabolism
    Plyometric
    Vascularity
    Double Split Training
    Training Split
    Hypertrophy
    Isolation
    Compound
    Concentric
    Eccentric
    Maltodextrin
    BCAA
    EFA
    Fish Oil
    Flax
    N02 / Arginine
    Glutamine
    Glucosamine
    Multivitamin
    Sesamin
    Sesathin
    Green Tea
    Ephedrine
    Caffeine
    Aspirin
    VasoPro / HCL
    Alpha-Lipoic Acid
    CLA
    COQ10
    Fenugreek
    Saw Palmetto
    Vanadyl Sulfate
    Carnitine
    Red Yeast Rice
    Cholesterol
    Polycostanol
    Tribulus
    Synephrine
    ZMA
    Transdermal
    ETS (AtLarge)
    Vitamin A / B / C / D / E
    Prohormone
    Testosterone
    Estrogen
    Steroid
    Westside Barbell
    Straight Bar
    Plates
    Dumbbells
    Barbells
    Collars
    Ankle Weights
    Pink Dumbbells
    Cheat Day
    Cheat Meal
    Flushing Method
    Cheat Reps
    Negatives
    Platoon System (21s)
    I Go / You Go
    Squeezes
    Stretching
    Warmup
    Cooldown
    Instinctive Training
    Journal / Log Book
    Crash
    Not-To-Failure Training
    Pre-Exhaust

    [highlight]Powerlifting - a type of competitive weightlifting which features three lifts: squat, bench press, and deadlift. Powerlifting competitors are divided by weight classes and performed by both men and women. Powerlifting workouts are generally a little bit different than bodybuilding workouts though many bodybuilders find it quite optimal to use many powerlifting techniques in their training.[/highlight]

    Bodybuilding
    Atkins
    South Beach
    Quad
    Ham
    Delt
    Trap
    Lat
    Bi
    Tri
    Calf
    Forearm
    Ab
    Middle Back
    Head
    Carb Cycling
    Protein-Sparing Effect
    Megadosing (BCAA, etc.)
    Oats
    Steel-Cut Oats
    Natty Peanut Butter

    [highlight]Drying Out - A process, usually undergone by competing bodybuilders or models, in which you try to get rid of the last bits of water in your body. This is usually done through the limiting of fluid intake, reduction in salt, sweating a lot, and sometimes diuretics.[/highlight]

    Ketosis
    Failure
    Fast-Twitch
    Slow-Twitch
    Negatives
    Cephalic Vein
    Arnold Press
    Simple Carb
    Complex Carb
    Whey Protein
    Soy
    Egg
    Casein
    Protein Blend

    [highlight]Diuretics - herbal pills and sometimes prescription drugs used to remove excess water from the body, usually used prior to bodybuilding shows. Most diuretics are considered to be quite harmful to one's health especially if not used responsibly or used too often.[/highlight]

    SGX / SC's programs

    [highlight]Clean Bulk - a bulking diet which is supposidly designed to gain very lean muscle mass while attempting to keep fat gain as minimal as possible. A clean bulk is usually fairly strict and has little cheat meals. A clean bulk is optimal for those who tend gain fat easily.[/highlight]

    [highlight]Dirty Bulk - a bulking diet in which the trainee is much more relaxed about cheat meals and does a lot of force-feeding to put away the calories. A dirty bulk will sometimes include much more Burger King than a clean bulk, and is not generally recommended, except MAYBE for the very ectomorphic bodytypes or the teenager who is just starting out and trying to pack on the mass, but even then it still isn't considered optimal over a cleaner diet.[/highlight]

    Lacto-Ovo
    Vegetarian
    Muscle Beach
    IFBB

    [highlight]Myositis - Muscular soreness due to inflammation that often Occurs 1-2 days after unaccustomed exercise. (*courtesy of bodybuilding.com)[/highlight]

    Mr. Olympia

    [highlight]Nuttin But A Peanut (j/k lol) - a term used by Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman during his training for psyching up purposes. Coleman is known for lifting with incredibly heavy weights and he often jokes about the weight being light and the workout being easy. His phrase "Nuttin' but a peanut" is seen quite often in bodybuilding forums. :)[/highlight]


    Some are here - http://www.getbig.com/glossary/terms.htm

    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/glossary.htm
     
    #5 1FastGTX, Nov 24, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2005
  6. The Abdominal Snowman

    The Abdominal Snowman Well-Known Member

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    GI = Glycemic Index, a number that indicates how quickly a carbohydrate brokes down in your body and enters the blood stream. http://www.glycemicindex.com/ (breaks)

    HST = Hytrophy Specific Training (oh, and on that subject, where IS hypertrophy? :D)

    Lats = Latorial muscles, the muscles on your back directly beneath your arm pits. They often give people the appearance of wings when they are flexed. (latissimus dorsi)

    LISS = Low Intensity Steady State, a type of cardio where your heart rate is kept at about 75% of your maximum heart rate and this supposedly is a good condition for fat loss.

    Reps = # of repititions for an exercise like pushups or bench press. There is no rest between repititions. A group of reps is called a Set. Phrase - "I do 4 sets of 8 reps each." (repetitions)

    Resisance training = weightlifting, bodyweight exercises (resistance, I know it was mentioned, but I include it for completeness)

    Supersets = There are different variations, but basically you go from a set of one exercise to another one that is similar but different then the first with no rest in between. Read links for more (than, but in this case I'd prefer from)

    Whey = a type of protein that is typically used in powder form to make shakes or as an additive to food. It's also in a most protein bars.

    Where's ABS? :D



    Very good job GravityHomer, another worthy addition from your part! :tucool:



    I noticed these in Fast's list and being 'tolerant vegan' I thought I'd be the one to write the definitions:


    Lacto-Ovo vegetarian: someone who doesn't eat any meat, but does consume eggs and dairy products

    Pesco vegetarian: someone who doesn't eat any meat, with the exception of fish. Pesco vegetarians are usually also lacto-ovo vegetarian

    Vegan: someone who doesn't consume meat or dairy, nor consumes or wears any other product for which animals have been used or killed.

    Tolerant vegan: someone who tries not to consume meat or dairy, nor tries to consume or wear any other product for which animals have been used or killed, unless he's visiting other people, in which case he'll accept the fact that it's very difficult to cook vegan in which case he'll eat lacto-ovo vegetarian foods instead. ;) Not to be included in the glossary of course, I thought it'd be friendly to tell you people what a tolerant vegan is. :lol:
     
  7. bradh

    bradh Well-Known Member

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    Great post homer lol

    However i don't consider the stiff legged deadlift the same has the Romanian Deadlift. Close but they are different.
     
  8. gravityhomer

    gravityhomer Elite Member
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    Thanks for the editing guys. Holy Crap Chris! Thanks for flushing out the list. :lol: , can't do much today, it being thanksgiving and all, and I'm travelling. Hopefully this weekend I can put more work into it. If you want to continue to add short definitions for some of the obscure ones that would be great, links too, links are good.
     
  9. 1FastGTX

    1FastGTX Elite Member
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    No problem dude! Sure thing about working on it, I will edit that post when and as I have time. My definitions will probably just come from my head, so they won't be too technical and may contain some opinions or errors, but of course feel free to edit/modify as you feel appropriate. :)
     
  10. marcus

    marcus Well-Known Member

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    Good thread Gravityhomer:tu:

    Sorry I dont have any suggestions, it looks daunting enough as it is:confused: :tucool:
     
  11. gravityhomer

    gravityhomer Elite Member
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    Thanks marcus, hows the french coming?
     
  12. marcus

    marcus Well-Known Member

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    Good thanks mate. I've actually booked a trip to France next year. I'll be staying at an eco-village for 3 months where not only can I practice my french but also learn about sustainable living and permaculture and how to build eco-huts etc. They are also into meditation and everyday mindfulness which is cool.

    How are you going with Tagalog?
     
  13. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    Here's some fun ones off the top of my head:

    DB = dumbbell *its spelled wrong in the list*

    SQ = Squat
    KB = kettlebell

    Hammer grip = alternate name for a parallel grip, popularized by hammer curls
    Mixed grip = using both a supinated and pronated grip
    Over-under grip = alternate name for a mixed grip
    Overhand grip = common name for a pronated grip
    Parallel grip = common name for a semi-supinated grip
    Pronated grip = palms facing away from the body
    Semi-supinated grip = palms facing each other
    Supinated grip = palms facing the body
    Underhand grip = common name for a supinated grip

    Chin-up = a pull-up using a supinated grip
    Pull-up = a pull-up using a pronated grip

    Concentric = movement that shortens or contracts a muscle under tension
    Eccentric = movement that lengthens a muscle under tension
    Negative = a common name for an eccentric movement
    Positive = a common name for a concentric movement

    Absolute strength = strength in relation to the weight lifted
    Relative strength = strength in relation to the ratio of the weight lifted to the lifter's body weight

    Raw = lifting without the use of any aids such as straps, belts, or wraps.

    Bodyweight Training = using the body's own weight as resistance, while either increasing volume or using progressively harder exercises to overload the muscles
    Bodybuilding = the manipulation of muscular size, body-fat, and muscular balance for aesthetics-based competition
    Olympic Lifting = the development of maximum relative strength on snatches and cleans & jerks for weight-class based competition
    Overload = increasing resistance beyond what the body has experienced in the short past; this is done by weight progression (adding more weight), exercise progression (using a harder exercise), or volume progression (doing more repetitions). Increasing time under resistance will also produce overload
    Powerlifting = the development of maximum absolute strength on squats, deadlifts, and bench presses for weight-class based competition
    Resistance training = the development of muscular strength or size using any method that puts a muscle under tension and progressively overloads it
    Strongman training = walking, loading, lifting, pulling, throwing, holding, or pressing nonconventional (cars, children, anchors, sand bags, etc.) or natural objects (stones, logs, etc.) in competition in regards to time, distance (height), or volume
    Total = powerlifting term: the sum of a lifter's tested 1-RM squat, deadlift, and bench press usually accompanied by the lifter's bodyweight at the time of competition
    Volume = the total number of repetitions performed in a given time period or workout
    Weight-training = the development of muscular strength or size in the noncompetitive environment

    CNS = the central nervous system
    Neuromuscular adaptation =

    Calisthenics =
    Plyometrics =

    Absolute Failure = inability to perform more repetitions and sustain a load based on concentric, eccentric, and isometric strength
    Beyond Failure = the use of forced repetitions to continue lifting a weight
    Close to Failure = lifting within 1-3 reps of failure or sustaining a load within 1-3 seconds of failure
    Concentric Failure = inability to perform more repetitions based on concentric strength
    Isometric Failure = inability to sustain a load based on muscular strength
    Failure = common shortening of the term "concentric failure"
    Fatigue = inability to perform more repetitions or sustain a load based on factors other than muscular strength
    Forced Repetition = lifting too much weight using a spotter's help

    This will be more like an encyclopedia now...
     
    #13 chicanerous, Nov 30, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2005
  14. gravityhomer

    gravityhomer Elite Member
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    Left it for a while. The books are just so dry to try to learn from, and the frustrating thing is we don't know if we're saying it right anyway, we have tapes but I don't even feel like they are pronouncing it right. We just happened to discuss having personal lessons with this person. It would be $35/per visit for me and my wife. Does this sound like a good deal? It seems like a lot. I just want to meet someone who speaks it but it is pretty rare here.


    Chicanerous, thanks for those descirptions I'll start adding them. :tu:
     
  15. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    This is fun!

    Bands = long bands of continuous stretchable rubber used to gradually increase or decrease resistance throughout an exercise's ROM; unlike chains, when attached to a bar, they resist movement, actively accelerating it during the eccentric and deccelerating it during the concentric.
    Bumper Plates = thick cylindrical disks of rubber that have hole in the center so that they can be loaded onto a barbell -- often brightly colored. Used in olympic lifting, they allowed a barbell to be safely dropped from a high height without destroying the floor. Common increments are 25, 20, 15, and 10 kilograms.
    Chains = lengths of heavy chain used to gradually increase resistance throughout an exercise's ROM; unlike bands, when attached to a bar, the chains do not resist movement.
    Clips =
    Collars =
    Dip belt = a belt with a length of chain attached to each end. The chain is threaded through plates and reattached to the belt. It is then worn around the waist, allowing the weights to hang between the legs and adding resistance to bodyweight exercises such as pull-ups or dips.
    Fractional Plates = plates that come in increments smaller than 2.5 pounds. Common increments are 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and 1 pounds.
    Plates = thin cylindrical disks of metal, sometimes coated with rubber, that have a hole in the center so that they can be loaded onto a barbell. Common increments are 45, 35, 25, 10, 5, and 2.5 pounds.

    Load = to add weight
    Unload = to remove weight
    Unweight = to add negative resistance. The assisted pull-up or dip machine exerts an upward force that cancels out part of the downward force of your bodyweight, allowing you to temporarily weigh less so that you are able to perform the movement; the machine provides negative resistance, unweighting you. This can also be done with bands.

    Rack = a stand that holds weights. "To rack a weight" is to put it on a stand. Weight can also be racked on the body, as in a squat or clean.

    ATG Squat = common name for a full squat
    Full Squat = squatting past parallel, often until the hams touch calves
    Parallel Squat = squatting until an imaginary line drawn between the knee and the hip joint is parallel (horizontal) to the floor

    More later... (I'll edit.)
     
    #15 chicanerous, Dec 1, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2005
  16. bradh

    bradh Well-Known Member

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    Wicked shit chicanerous, you getting this somewhere or typing it up yourself?
     
  17. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    Straight out of my head. Let me know if I post anything that's wrong or controversial, please!
     
    #17 chicanerous, Dec 1, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2005
  18. 1FastGTX

    1FastGTX Elite Member
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    GH - as I edit my posts, I will put the new definitions or entries [highlight]in red, highlight text like this[/highlight]. That way you'll be able to easily tell what is new. Once you've added these I'll remove the highlights from ones you've added. (And if you can tell me what you add, assuming there are a bunch, that would be good, but no biggie.)

    Hope this helps dude. :)

    Chris
     
  19. marcus

    marcus Well-Known Member

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    I know exactly what you mean. I'm convinced that no matter what language learning resources you have available, you can only learn a limited amount. To really take great strides you must immerse yourself in the language and force yourself to speak it even when you have no idea what you're doing. With me, my French vocab is really good, my pronunciation is perfect but when I'm forced to have a proper conversation, I fall to pieces. Thats why I'm going to France, I need to force myself to speak it all day, every day until it becomes natural.

    I wont say anymore, because this is the wrong thread. But for future reference, here is a really cool website, with a great forum where you can learn from helpful polyglots: http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/e/index.html
     
  20. gravityhomer

    gravityhomer Elite Member
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    okay, Chris and chicanerous, I've added all the terms that you guys provided defintions for.

    Chicanerous, those are great, thanks for writing them up!
     

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