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I'm now an attested ex-diabetic. Thanks JSF!

Discussion in 'General Health/Fitness & Injuries' started by philph, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. philph

    philph Well-Known Member

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    I had a phone call today from my doctor to report that, as per her suspicions, my recent blood tests show me to be no longer a sufferer of Diabetes Mellitus, and my medical record has thus been updated accordingly.

    Here are my results:

    Fasting blood glucose = 2.8 mmol/L
    (up to 6.1 is normal; above 7.0 indicates diabetes).

    2 hours after ingesting 75g glucose = 5.6 mmol/L
    (up to 7.8 is normal; above 11.1 indicates diabetes).

    My hba1c, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, and kidney function had already been found normal.

    I feel I owe a debt of thanks to johnstonefitness.com. The forums here were an important part of both the excitement and learning that drove and directed my return to health. More basically, they inspired my devotion to self-improvement. This has born tangible fruit.
     
    #1 philph, Mar 25, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2010
  2. Ecrivain

    Ecrivain Well-Known Member

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    That's outstanding! I've enjoyed following your progress and am incredibly pleased to see you've gotten these results from your changes in lifestyle. You've done so much more than just transform your physique, you've given yourself a new life. Congratulations! :tu:
     
  3. carguy

    carguy Well-Known Member

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    Wow. This is great news. :nod: And you have all the tools and knowledge to stay healthy. Pay it forward.
     
  4. Davie mac

    Davie mac Active Member

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    superb news,well done:tu:
     
  5. guava

    guava Elite Member
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    Great news.

    You've put in some hard work and dedication to get to where you are. :claplow:
     
  6. Jaer

    Jaer Well-Known Member

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    :claphigh:

    Jaer
    is most impressed!
     
  7. livedog

    livedog Well-Known Member

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    Excellent :claphigh:
     
  8. philph

    philph Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the comments :)
     
  9. PAF

    PAF Well-Known Member

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    Fantastic Phil! Great not only for yourself, but you'll now be an inspiration to anyone else trying to handle their diabetes.
     
  10. iceman21

    iceman21 Active Member

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    Phil, that is so great to hear. I can only imagine how you must feel to have that monkey off of your back.

    I am very interested in how you managed this, the hard work that you went through. I am worried about the diabetes bug. I am a pretty good candidate and I need to make sure I am taking the right steps to move away from the high risk pool.
     
  11. philph

    philph Well-Known Member

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    Honestly, there was nothing extraordinary involved.

    My first observation was that improvement only started when both dietary control and exercise were present simultaneously. My experience is that neither is sufficient on its own (except for short durations).

    I cut out various things from my diet: I reduced hydrogenated fats to ZERO, with no (intentional) exceptions, ever. I drastically reduced consumption of foods with added sugar, etc. I ate more nuts. I increased my intake of high quality protein foods, especially meat, dairy and eggs (in different proportions at various times). Initially I reduced saturated fats, but then resumed eating them (indeed preferring butter and lard to vegetable-based cooking oils) with no noticeable problem.

    At the same time, I exercised intensely (by my standards), at least 4 times a week. I was very overweight begin with, with high blood pressure and poor lipids as well as type II diabetes, and I lost fat rapidly during the first year, with the most dramatic change being during the first 9 months. Most of my blood tests normalised within about 3 to 6 months of making the main lifestyle changes. During this time, I also counted my calories very precisely and on average I was on a moderately low calorie intake (but not very low — just enough to lose a couple of pounds a week on average. I ignored "formulas" and found by trial and error how many calories to eat, and when to adjust this.)

    I made further improvements by moving more towards weight training and intense compound exercises, especially once I had reached a point where I couldn't progress further with other kinds of exercise because I was too drained. Once I had established a habit of focusing on intense bursts of heavy lifting 4 or more times a day, and had built a little muscle, I found that I no longer had to count my calories, and that as long as I stuck with correct food CHOICES there was no tendency to regain fat, even when eating according to appetite.

    As I continued with the exercise regimes that worked best for building muscle for me (optimal for me, when I had the time available, was 5 days a week, large numbers of sets of compound movements, low reps (beyond 5 felt like a marathon to me), going to failure or near failure a lot of the time. I gained a lot of weight but remained lean. Indeed, I re-entered the "Overweight" BMI category, but all my blood tests remained solidly good, and I can state without fear of error that BLOOD GLUCOSE, BLOOD PRESSURE and LIPIDS ARE NOT MADE WORSE AGAIN ONCE YOU HAVE ELIMINATED ANY INITIAL OBESITY AND BUILD SUBSTANTIAL MUSCLE, EVEN IF YOU REACH A HIGH BMI DUE TO ADDED LEAN MASS.

    Recently, due to extreme work commitments (very hard economic times for all of us, I'm sure), I've been unable to train for a substantial period of time, and I have regained some fat and lost muscle. However, my diabetes was discovered to have disappeared during these worse current conditions, which suggests that the improvements to be made by a) sticking forever with a healthy diet; and b) improving metabolism with intense, especially weight-based, exercise, has long lasting effects. Once I'm able to resume training, I am hugely confident that I will permanently prevent a return of my ill-health.
     
    #11 philph, May 11, 2010
    Last edited: May 11, 2010
  12. philph

    philph Well-Known Member

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    I'm pleased to report that as at my most recent checkup, the results of which I received from my doc a few days ago, I am still an ex-diabetic.

    Those who are familiar with John Stone Fitness will already understand that improved health isn't like a one-night stand. It's a soul mate, and it's there smiling and beautiful the next day.
     
  13. carguy

    carguy Well-Known Member

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    Hi philph. I had forgotten that I had posted in this thread last year. Great to hear that all is well a year later. You are to be commended!:nod:
     
  14. jbivens

    jbivens Active Member

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    Well said. Congrats on staying on the right path and being healthy. Great job!
     
  15. Seltzer

    Seltzer Elite Member

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    Congrats on the wonderful news!
     
  16. Bob T

    Bob T Well-Known Member

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    Very, very good! Keep it up, man...:tucool:
     
  17. imelda

    imelda Well-Known Member

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    Wow, what wonderful news to the millions of folks who've received a "life sentence" of diabetes! Great that you're committed to the lifestyle of fitness now.:tucool:
    The way you workout and eat sounds very much like the paleo or primal style. I've heard of so many folks reversing diabetes and high cholesterol with this approach. I'm curious, though: Did your doctors approve of, for instance, your choice of lard and butter over vegetable oil? It just seems to me that most members of the medical establishment are still unwilling to go against the accepted government guidelines of a high-carb, low-fat diet.
     
  18. philph

    philph Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Imelda. I'm hoping very much that other people in similar circumstances will see that my outcome wasn't due to to anything exceptional on my part, other than the good fortune of having the right information.

    I think my doctor was just glad to see my blood tests started coming back normal. When I revealed my approach to diet, she didn't try to persuade me to change it. Nevertheless, I am sure she thought my health was improving despite my lifestyle rather than because of it, which was an incorrect analysis from my point of view, though it was a reasonable compromise since it still put results first.

    I think that is probably true. The diet I was told to follow was basically: reduce all fat to as close to zero as possible; make starchy carbs the main food in every single meal; reduce protein to a low level (consuming only whatever protein is unavoidable because it is found in, or accompanies, the starchy meals); restrict fruits; reduce the amount of sugar in tea and coffee (even though I never used added sugar in the first place); eat less meat. Vegetables should be added now and again if possible. Exercise is an optional extra. No mention was made of different kinds of fat; no mention was made of fibre, minerals, vitamins, or calories.
     

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