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I think I have an eating disorder...

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by don_1987, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. don_1987

    don_1987 Well-Known Member

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    Well not really... or rather I'm not really sure if I have one... but the thing is, lately I think I'm developing bulimia, or binge eating disorder. I'm not sure if it's really an eating disorder or just a cheat day, but I've read about eating disorders and I think I'm very close to the symptoms of bulimia. I really hope it's not bulimia, so how do you really distinguish if you have an eating disorder? How can you seperate between a cheat day and an eating disorder? Help?...
     
  2. tomination

    tomination Well-Known Member

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    Man I would go see a doctor for that, somebody who is a professional. It can't be a good thing, and if you think you are borderline bulemic, then you definitely should get professional help before it gets worse. Im not sure if anyone on this forum could be qualified to give you any better advice.

    Stay Healthy,

    Tom
     
  3. RTE

    RTE Well-Known Member

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    Do you just "overeat"? Or do you try to vomit the food up or take laxatives trying to rid yourself of it?

    While diet is important, you have never been overweight while posting here. concern yourself more with school, music, sports, life, family, and a little exercise. let diet be set on back burner for awhile.
     
  4. fluke

    fluke Well-Known Member

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    Do you induce vomiting after you eat? If so, yes, you have a problem.

    And the solution is simple,.. stop! Bile is really bad for your esophogas. If you're concerned about your health, you'd do better to keep it down, even if you do feel guilty. (But remember, one cheat meal/day per week is ok!!)

    If you're not inducing vomiting then please explain why you think theres a problem.. is it just a constant urge to binge? If so, maybe you arn't eating the right foods, or enough.
     
  5. kolin

    kolin Well-Known Member

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    yeah dont eating high gi foods make you hungry again faster. Try sticking to a low GI diet to fill ya up for longer.
     
  6. don_1987

    don_1987 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies guys... No! I never try to vomit the foods I ate (because I know for sure that's the first sign of an eating disorder)...but I exercise a lot in order to burn some of those calories... :db: . I just felt weird about myself because since January, I seem to be struggling with eating in moderate portion and binging.. But so far I feel good, last time I binge was yesterday, today seems to be ok... I'll just keep in touch with you guys,...

    Thanks alot for this very inspiring advice (I really need one right now... :lol: ) but the truth is, I was overweight before I joined this forum and while trying to lose that fat, I was already concern about eating disorders... and I try my best to avoid being anorexic because I was consuming very little calories at first - 800 kcal and over exercising... But anyway, that's over now and with the knowledge I've attain over the past year, I hope I don't have to travel that road again...
     
  7. Sturm

    Sturm Well-Known Member

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  8. guava

    guava Elite Member
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    I'd say if you're suspecting you might have an eating disorder, then chances are good that you have one.

    It's NOT as simple as "just stop". That's like telling an alcoholic "just stop drinking". Sure, it's good advice to try to focus on other parts of your life, and if that works for you, then great. But, in my understanding, the whole principle behind an eating disorder is that you CAN'T focus on any other parts of your life.

    You do not need to be overweight (or underweight) to have an eating disorder, and you can have an eating disorder without vomiting as well.

    An eating disorder is not a weakness, it's a sickness, and I think you're wiser to find someone to help you treat it rather than trying to fight it on your own.
     
  9. featherz

    featherz Well-Known Member

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    Exercise bulimia DOES exist.. I overexercise as well but not intentionally - it ends up as 'I'm bored, lemme go exercise'. STILL gets me in trouble! LOL. However, if it's a binge then an exercise purge, that could be problematic.

    Overeating is generally just that - you see something yummy, eat too much of it, feel guilty. :) I think of binging as mindless, desperate cramming of everything and anything within a short period of time (whole cakes, jars of things, etc). You don't even know what you are doing. This has never been a problem of mine, but this is how it's been described to me by others.

    H.
     
  10. Jude3085

    Jude3085 Well-Known Member

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    If you are on a very low calorie diet and not eating enough you will binge and binge because your body has been deprived. If this is the case you need to start eating your basic calorie needs until you feel that you are not deprived anymore. The human body is a fascinating organism that will subconsciously overeat because that is how it is was molded. Our ancestors were deprived of food and ate and ate because they didn't know where or when the next meal will come from.

    But I could be totally wrong and you may very well be on the verge of a eating disorder. I would still not take any chances - talk to a professional. Remember you only have one chance here, take control now before it distorts your awareness any further.
     
  11. Chris

    Chris Well-Known Member

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    Well, to be just a bit blunt here, if you don't know the differences between a cheat day and a serious eating disorder, it doesn't seem like you've done much reading or research about the underlying properties of Bulimia or Binge Eating.

    Sounds to me like you've simply read off a few symptoms on the list and thought you qualified...

    B.E.D: Symptoms include

    1) Eating until you cannot possibly eat any more.
    2) Eating much quicker than usual.
    3) Eating excessive amounts of food even when not hungry.
    4) Feelings of disgust, depression, or guilt after massive eating episodes.
    5) Eating in private for fear of being seen with large quantities of food.

    If I remember correctly, it's recommended that if you meet any two of those criteria, you should consult your local physician, but let's face it, meeting two of those symptoms isn't exactly like winning the lottery.

    Now i'm not saying you don't have an eating disorder, you very well could have one due to some of the things i've seen you post here in the past, but statistics say it's very unlikely and it's most likely just a case of reading through the outlining issues and worrying too much.

    With that said, as previously suggested, if you, or any of your immediate friends or family think you truly have a problem, you should go talk to your health care professional immediately and find out for sure.
     
  12. don_1987

    don_1987 Well-Known Member

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    No... thank God I don't have an eating disorder... :D Yes, you're right, I've experienced 2-3 of the symptoms and I was afraid of having an eating disorder. But I believe I've got it all under control, and by the way, I've visited a psychologist from my school and he said I'm just overstressed of things or something like that, but the bottomline is, he said that I don't have an eating disorder (whew...)

    I think some of the symptoms I've experienced qualified as an eating disorder (if view from only one point of view) I mean let's face it, we seldomly have times in our lives where we want to eat everything in site and then feeling guilty, right? But it doesn't mean we have an eating disorder... But again, I just want to thank you guys for all your replies... :o
     
  13. never2old

    never2old Well-Known Member

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    Jude3085 and Chris have very good points. To help you "calibrate," here is a short story about me. In 1984, I was age 28. I was in probably peak condition for my life. Weight 180, ran 20 miles a week at 6-minute pace, lots of strength both above and below the waist. I got some crazy idea that I needed to be even thinner. I read a fitness book, began the first 2 weeks of a diet in it. It called for 1200-1500 calories per day for 2 weeks, then 2000 for I think it was 6 more weeks.

    About 10 days into that first 2 weeks, I was standing alone in my kitchen late at night, just before going to bed. I suddenly began reaching for every junk food there was in the house. Everything within reach that had sugar, I grabbed some of it. I even spooned molasses from the wife's supply of baking ingredients. Brown (or "browned") sugar - spooned it right out of the box. This lasted about 20 minutes.

    I did not utterly stuff myself. I did not vomit. But I ate a LOT. I did not feel guilt. But I did feel fear that I had never felt before. I aborted the diet. The sad truth is, I did not do proper follow-up. I should have forced myself first, to think about that episode, and think hard on it. The acute fear gave way to an attitude of, Whoa, I am overdoing it big-time. I'd better throttle-back here.

    So what happened? I over-did the correction. I QUIT exercising and STOPPED paying attention to what I ate, pre-diet. A little over a year after that, I was back up to over 190, back out of shape. I basically never again took care with my eating and overall health. Until recently, January. -Martin
     
  14. Skoorb

    Skoorb Well-Known Member

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    You quite possibly have one, but you definitely may not :) A professioanl would best diagnose it, but I'd caution that I suspect most professionals are not familiar with the "cheat day". Something that is considered by many to be safe - and is safe in moderation - may seem to a professional as something out of whack.

    In any case, I'd wonder what those around you say? Another caution: "healthy eating" that many people here follow is considered by many food-unconscious people as unhealthy/abnormal etc.

    [q]1) Eating until you cannot possibly eat any more.
    2) Eating much quicker than usual.
    3) Eating excessive amounts of food even when not hungry.
    4) Feelings of disgust, depression, or guilt after massive eating episodes.
    5) Eating in private for fear of being seen with large quantities of food.
    [/q]I've had those top four from time to time, and frankly I think most of the population has! I think severity and frequency would be a key factor in this...
     
  15. featherz

    featherz Well-Known Member

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  16. elimcpheron

    elimcpheron Well-Known Member

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    I think a lot of people on these forums, myself included sometimes struggle with body image.

    The weird thing is, I didn't struggle with body image nearly as much when I was overweight, now that I'm a lot more healthy and fit I think about it a lot more and have even tried vomiting when I cheated (unsuccessfully, I must not have a good gag reflex). I know its bad for you both physically and mentally but I struggle with my body image.
     
  17. Skoorb

    Skoorb Well-Known Member

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    Neat! I had not read that, but figured professionals would often have a skewed view, and they do :) The difficulty is deciding whether the problem is in their lack of education about bodybuilding, or in fact with the person; ie. the professional is right, and the individual does indeed have an eating disorder.

    Best bet would be to find a physician who's a part time bodybuilder :tu:
    Probably so. When you're fat you know that your body sucks and it's hopelessly unattractive. You can almost just give in to it and give up on the idea of looking good, because you won't. But, when you start to lose weight and put time in you become motivated to see what you can do, and you test yourself. Now holding yourself accountable you feel stressed and upset if something goes wrong. I have no doubt that many of us do spend a lot of time worrying about it, and often more than many people who are significantly less attractive with shirts off!
    Sounds less like a disorder to me and more like a motivated dedication. I do think it can go too far - not enjoying a piece of your wife's birthday cake, for instance, but using food to contribute to a healthy goal should not be shunned.
     
    #17 Skoorb, Feb 11, 2005
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2005
  18. featherz

    featherz Well-Known Member

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    My husband read this part of the above article:

    "These Harvard docs said that individuals with this disorder are known to routinely prepare all of their meals for the day in advance, packaging precisely measured quantities of specific foods (lean chicken or fish with steamed vegetables) in small containers to be consumed at prescribed hours throughout the day."

    He said 'OMG that's YOU!'. LOL.

    Still trying to figure out what the problem is here:

    "(3) Strict adherence to a rigid diet with at least 2 of the following features:

    (a) At least 5 meals per day, consumed on a regular schedule, for example every 3 hours.

    (b) Meals all consist of high-calorie, high-protein, low-fat foods or food supplements.

    (c) A significant amount of time and money is spent acquiring, preparing and eating these specialized meals.
    "
    Umm, yeah, so? :)
     
  19. Tanis6909

    Tanis6909 Well-Known Member

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    and this is considered a DISORDER???!!!???
    :eek:

    man, i must have fitlexia or something then...cause i brought a bag of food into work today that had 4 meals in it...that I ate at specific times throughout the day in order to meet my body's needs for the day (centered around my training schedule)

    but you know what? I look and feel good, and my self image is much better than it was a few months ago. this has led to a more social and outgoing personality and i just paid a visit to the doc the other day (wierd cist on my head...got that taken care of) and other than the quarter sized bump on my noggin he said i couldnt be in better health....so i guess if i have to have a "disorder" i'm glad its a healthy one
     
  20. don_1987

    don_1987 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that's exactly my point, having an eating disorder and having the same symptoms can be very disturbing. But it doesn't mean that when you have some of the symptoms, then your having an eating disorder, right?
     

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