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I bench 260lbs, how about you?

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by RobP, Aug 31, 2006.

  1. doordude42

    doordude42 Senior Member

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    That is possibly the most "dead on" advise anyone has given. Well done RT.:tucool:
     
  2. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    Yes that makes sense. I thought the x2 was reps.
     
  3. bagobonez

    bagobonez Well-Known Member

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    I bench about 265 max, I do 10 reps of 205 on barbell bench. I'm definitely not "buff." IN fact my forearms are very skinny looking, but that's just my genetics. My chest aint too bad, but even my triceps aren't very defined. My arms measure about 15 3/4 inches flexed and cold. I would say I'm stronger than I look, even though alot of my friends say that I'm looking buff and have gotten considerably bigger since I started working out two years ago, I by no means feel like I'm "buff."
     
  4. Demon Knight

    Demon Knight Well-Known Member

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    That's a very admirable bench, bagobonez!:tu:

    On another note, the weights you can push/pull should always be put into perspective with your size.

    A 5'9'' weighing around 170lbs LBM benching 250 for reps will look much more impressive than a 6'3'' who has the same LBM and bench.

    I stand 5'9'' and 156lbs at 9% bf, I can currently bench 160lbs, slightly more than my bodyweight for 6-8 reps. But that's ME pushing, not my spotter helping me from the 1st rep!

    Once I get to benching 1.5x bodyweight for 6-8 reps, I WILL be bigger.

    It's incremental. You go up 10-20lbs on your big compounds(bench,squat,row etc), your LBM goes up 1-2lb (this is not a fact, but its the general correlation for me). I reckon I'll be about 170LBM when I can do 300/400/500 for 1RM. Around 2-3 years from now!:eek:
     
  5. Hulking Lummox

    Hulking Lummox Active Member

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    Strength for certain lifts as well as armwrestling is VERY dependent on bone stucture. Not to mention they way that you've conditioned yourself.

    I'm 6'5" and thus have a large wingspan. I'm prone to losing at arm wrestling to guys who dont excercise, only because of their shorter arms and the advantage that puts them at. Also, Imagine how much lower my elbows go when benchpressing. When I touch the bar to my chest my tri's are going to be working their asses off vs a shorter person with proportionately shorter arms. The result is that I can only do my body weight of 205 1 rep. I can squat 265 1 time as well which I've been convinced is piss weak. I wonder how these lifts actually stack up but that's just ego... I'm mainly in it for the discipline and the "take on the world" feeling that comes in conjunction with listening to powermetal while lifting :guitar:(no ego here :lol:). I'm just thankful to get some hypertrophy for my efforts because strength isn't my strongpoint (irrrrrony)

    Don't let your workouts get stale. Change everything up to trick your muscles and you'll keep getting stronger. Also it sounds like you're cutting and so you can't expect to be making record lifts when your body is trying to scrape by on a lower calorie diet. Just hang in there, you've got a great attitude! :gl:
     
  6. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    You might want to consider keeping your elbows from going behind your body during pressing and rowing exercise to avoid injury.
     
  7. bagobonez

    bagobonez Well-Known Member

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    I am also 6'5" and find it very straining for me to touch the bar to my chest. I usually stop about 2-3 inches from my chest before going back up. Otherwise, I feel like it puts alot of strain on my wrists and shoulders which isn't really necessary. I make up for it on dumbell bench where I really get a full ROM. I weigh 210 and bench 265, so I feel that's pretty good considering my long wingspan. Short people don't know how much harder it is to do bench press, pushups, pullups, etc. because you're pushing/pulling the weight for a greater distance.
     
  8. Hulking Lummox

    Hulking Lummox Active Member

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    Wow, that's odd. I hadn't heard that before and I've never been bothered in the slightest by making chest contact. Then again had been doing really wide grip with my elbows out wide so that could be why. I've recently changed to doing the proper close in form with a narrower grip. I suppose now would be a wise time to change that habit! Thank you, guys. :)
     
  9. Ziegenbak

    Ziegenbak Active Member

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    Is it wrong to arch your back when maxing out your bench? I tend to keep my elbows much more in(always felt like it was working my inner chest more) when working out, and the arch helps a lot to sqeek out those last couple reps, and those last couple lbs on a max.

    I really have no clue what my max is atm, but I work out with dumbells 90x2 with 4 sets of 8. I was also able to do bodyweight(185) 15x at a bodybuilding show and expo last week(cold no warmup), and got a free t-shirt for doing that:D

    Tragically my squat probably isn't too far ahead of my bench.:o 255 4x8 and I probably don't even go low enough for that to count.
     
  10. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    Yeah that advice has been out there for a while:

    A common bench-press mistake is lowering the bar all the way to the chest. A lot depends on your chest size and the length of your arms, but as a general rule, you should stop when your elbows reach the level of the bench. Going any farther puts too much stress on your shoulder joint.

    You shouldn't row the elbows behind the body either.

    Not everybody takes this advice - but it is endorsed by Dr. Frank Jobe, who is a foremost authority on athlete's shoulders and elbows (he performed the "Tommy John" surgery on Tommy John). He is also a weightlifting enthusiast.
     
  11. Omaha

    Omaha Well-Known Member

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    Hmm that's news to me as well. I always found I could move much more weight if I didn't touch my chest, therefor figured to be a shorter ROM. Kind of like saying you squat 400, but only do a quarter squat.

    Interesting.
     
  12. Andrew

    Andrew Well-Known Member

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    If you don't touch the weight to your chest, you're not really bench pressing. Shortening the ROM can have its place in training (e.g. board presses), but you shouldn't do most of your work like that. It's ineffective.

    Sure, you're less likely to get hurt doing quarter squats than real squats, but are 1/4s really the better option?
     
  13. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    Paul Chek doesn't see it that way.

    It seems neither does Jeremy Likness

    It also seems that the people who have to fix broken shoulders for a living are pretty much decided that too much ROM on presses and rows endangers the joint. Hey, they're your shoulders. Do what you want. But shoulders are hard to fix.
     
  14. bagobonez

    bagobonez Well-Known Member

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    I don't agree that you're not really bench pressing if the bar doesn't touch your chest. You can still build muscle and get stronger if you stop a couple of inches short. And actually, it may be a bit harder to stop that weight from coming down with your muscles alone instead of using your rib cage like a trampoline like some people do.
     
  15. sleeper

    sleeper Well-Known Member

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    That seems a bit dogmatic. First, it can't be inaffective if so many people do it this way (bar a few inches above chest) and clearly have the results to show for it. Personally, I always had to lift lighter weight, and found it hard on my shoulders when lowering to my chest. Not surprisingly, i found that didn't make me grow as much as not lowering it all the way.

    And, i think the idea of ROM is great on paper but like anything it can have its demerits. To me, full ROM is a training style. And styles come down to choice and in general its good to cycle through several styles to change up your routine. Currently i'm trying static contraction, which has basically ZERO ROM and it seems to be kick starting my progress. I gave up a long time ago the idea that there's one way to train.

    Steve
     
  16. Omaha

    Omaha Well-Known Member

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    Isn't the rule in competition that you have to touch your chest?
     
  17. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    Competitions have the benefit of often being suited, which will help protect against shoulder damage, etc. Many powerlifters (especially bench specialists) are overweight which also reduces their ROM. Also, they lift with the elbows-in, rather than out like a bodybuilders, which is much better for the shoulder.

    If you keep the elbows out, bodybuilding style, while benching, I'd definitely recommend reducing your ROM to help prevent future injury. However, if you lift powerlifting style with the elbows in, the full ROM is perfectly fine.
     
    #37 chicanerous, Sep 4, 2006
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2006
  18. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    If you want to compete, you will have to take the risk.

    But for training? It seems to be an unnecessary risk.
     

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