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Hypothyroid Woes

Discussion in 'General Health/Fitness & Injuries' started by Carole, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. Carole

    Carole Well-Known Member

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    :)I’ve was put on medication in mid December for hypothyroidism. My first thyroid levels check is coming up soon and I have been searching the internet for information on the thyroids impact on weight and muscle mass. Unlike most hypothyroids I had no weight issues……….well that is to say my weight was low and required my watching and increasing calories sometimes in an effort to maintain but certainly I had no inclination to ‘gain’ weight as do most with like conditions. I am having difficulty finding sites addressing my concerns and even when I do……….. (http://mesomorphosis.com/articles/gundill/thyroid-muscle-growth.htm
    I confess reading the information is easily done but I find understanding and evaluating WHAT I AM READING difficult. Specifically I am interested in determining two things; why my weight issues are opposite what most experience and as a result might I expect a weight gain (not a good thing); and is it possible that I might begin to see a greater propensity for muscle hypertrophy as a result of taking thyroid meds?

    Does anyone have experience, insight or information they might be willing to share?
    (And oh goodness, that would be in ‘layman’s terms’ please. :blank:)
     
  2. vertigo88

    vertigo88 Active Member

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    I don't have direct knowledge of hypothyroidism (except for in pets...but that's a bit different :D). I think that maybe whatever test you have might have indicated you have thyroid issues, but given you're obviously well versed in diet and excercise, perhaps the neg weight issues have been mostly negated.

    If there is one thing that is fairly clear with medical issues it's that one disease or illness doesn't affect everyone the same way. I know two people at work who are hypo as well, but they also don't do much if any activity and there lunch habits are a little shocking :rolleyes:
     
  3. Carole

    Carole Well-Known Member

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    :)
    First of all thank you for your interest and for taking time to reply but there is no doubt that the tsh numbers are high. Would that it were true about my diet, however in truth I do have knowledge of nutritious eating and do apply such usually but, in point of fact, some of the things I do/did eat when my numbers were tumbling, in order to ‘maintain’ my weight would ‘disgust’ most judicious members of the forum and at the least be considered an appalling abuse of body rather than a ‘mere’ indulgence in a “cheat” meal. One of the things that concerns me is, if in being an anomaly to the usual manifestation of symptoms, I might also expect with therapy to (rather than loose weight gained as most seem to do) gain weight as a result of the replacement therapy. (Not something I should like to do)

    Once again I do thank you for your interest and input………..:)
     
  4. Carole

    Carole Well-Known Member

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    :)
    Well, it was the weekend and having been a member for awhile now I realize the activity often ‘slows’ over such………especially this weekend I would imagine…”Super Bowl” and all………That said, I have continued to “google” in my search for information regarding hypothyroidism and just this afternoon ‘stumbled’ onto the following two links which I thought most interesting. I realize the topic will hold no interest for those not currently directly effected but, and in light of the necessary time involved and difficulty I encountered in my search, I have thought to post my ‘findings’ for anyone who might have an interest… be it now or at some later time…. http://thyroid.about.com/library/derry/bl5.htm

    http://thyroid.about.com/od/thyroiddrugstreatments/l/blderryb.htm

    On the off chance these links might be of some interest and use. :)
     
    #4 Carole, Feb 1, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2009
  5. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

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    I've actually got hypothyroidism, and have been on replacement therapy for about 10 years. You might not have the symptoms because you might have "sub-clinical" hypothyroidism. That is when your TSH is high, but your thyroid hormone levels (t3 and t4) are still normal. This means that your thyroid can still produce normal hormones, but it needs greater stimulation from TSH to do it. So, if this is true in your case, it suggests that your thyroid may be slowly shutting down, but at the moment, it can still produce hormones at a normal level.

    Hormone replacement therapy won't cause you to gain weight. If anything, it will help you lose weight.
     
  6. Carole

    Carole Well-Known Member

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    :) Hello Joe, I remembered you had posted something about this in another place earlier and I went back and re-read. Goodness, with a TSH of 20 I’m wondering how long one could walk about with such before diagnosis. You must have been having some significant symptoms; did you find all diminished quickly after being put on replacement therapy?

    My thyroid has been spiking in the last number of years and receding to what is, generally, considered a normal level only to spike again a year or two later. I thought your comment about my thyroid simply “shutting down” interesting as that was precisely what my internist suggested might be going on…….sort of a gradual ‘wearing out’.

    In ‘googling’ around I think I’m reading that the weight one usually gains in association with hypothyroidism is not necessarily true ‘fat’ but as much fluid (of some sort) retention……..do you have any specific knowledge of such? What ever.... I do thank you for sharing your thoughts and information with me………..:nod:
     
  7. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I was tired all the time. Couldn't stay awake no matter what. I weighed around 190 for a good 10 years, and then within 1 year had gained almost 30 pounds with no change in my diet. A friend suggested I get a blood test to find out if I had a thyroid problem. Turns out that I did. :(

    In my case, it took quite awhile (about 6 months) to totally get rid of all the symptoms, but that was because my doctor was really conservative about thyroid dosage, and it took a really long time to get my TSH down to a normal level. I felt bad even when TSH was around 5. That is supposedly within "normal" range, but most people with functioning thyroids don't have TSH levels that high. I feel best when my TSH is around 1-2. When I finally got it down to 2 for the first time, I felt much better.

    Well, if your thyroid isn't putting out enough hormone, it can actually make you gain fat more easily. The reason is that the thyroid hormone helps regulate your metabolism, and if you don't have enough hormone, your metabolism slows way down (which is why people who have hypothyroidism get cold easily and feel tired). However, in your case, if you get medicated before your thyroid levels drop below normal levels, then you shouldn't really have any of those kind of problems.

    I assume that your doctor has you on synthroid (or some equivalent medication), and if so, it should keep you from experiencing symptoms associated with low thyroid. :nod:
     
  8. zkat

    zkat Well-Known Member

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    I have been following the thread, just haven't had time to repsond.

    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's 2 years ago in April - at the time my TSH was 25 and the antibody levels were 30,000 (yes - that is the right number) I had gained some weight - in the year before I was dx - I had gained about 12 lbs, most was fluid - some was diet/lifestyle. We were spending a lot of time at the lake and drinking most weekends. While I did not put on a lot of fat - it was very, very hard for me to lose. I had dropped my calories down to about 1500, was lifting 4x a week, running and playing 2 soccer games and could not lose any weight. Later that year is when I was dx and then it all made sense. I still retain fluid when my levels are off - it is almost as reliable as blood test.

    It took about 4 months to get my levels right and I felt good for about 8 months, but then starting dragging again. My TSH had gone back up to 8, so my dose increased and I am back at 3.6 and feel good. My doctor explained it the same way - it's like my thyroid to "sputtering out" and we will have to continue to raise my dose for years. The draw back is that sometimes is "fires back up" and my levels will be too high for a short time. He has taken the approach that if I feel good and they are not too far off - don't mess with them.

    If you don't respnd well to Synthroid (I had an pretty severe allergic reation - my heart rate jumped to 150 and I was covered in hives), you might research Armour Thyroid. It is derived from Pig Thyroid hormone - which is the closest to human. Some people find they just feel better on it and it is not expensive - without insurance 120 mg was $18 a month.

    Kat.
     

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