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How to break into the HDTV era

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussions' started by Thrillhouse17, Nov 19, 2005.

  1. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    Yes to some degree, but if you are talking 30", you are talking LCD anyway. So you don't have a choice.

    It's not a huge deal these days, but certain types of LCDs have better viewing angles.
     
  2. FBChick

    FBChick Active Member

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    Yes.. this is still the case. When you have a good idea of where the TV will go and the viewing angle.. be she to try an approximate that at the store when shopping LCDs.

    Of course the flip side is the issue with Plasmas and reflecting light. Our plasma really reflects the overhead light in our room and makes the screen almost impossible to view when that light is on. Thankfully we have lower level lamps to light up the space when watching TV that do have cause us problems.
     
  3. kmfisher

    kmfisher Well-Known Member

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    Remember that a 30" 4:3 TV will equate to about a 37" - 40" 16:9 TV to ensure the 4:3 content is the same size.

    LCD's are the way to go these days. There's really nothing bad about them anymore. Great viewing angles, great color, great brightness, great life, etc.
     
  4. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    I much prefer plasmas to LCDs for their better fast motion and truer blacks. And the life on the plasmas are not an issue anymore. The new Panasonics are 100,000 hours before half brightness. Plenty.

    But the majority of the market seems to go for LCDs.
     
    #24 MannishBoy, Mar 12, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2008
  5. Gordo

    Gordo Well-Known Member

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    LCD TV manufacturer's claim 170 degrees viewing. Kuro plasmas are something like 180 degrees.

    It's really a toss-up these days
     
  6. Gordo

    Gordo Well-Known Member

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    I prefer the contrast of plasma....but LCD still has the greener footprint.
     
  7. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    If you don't run a plasma on torch mode (read like they are in Best Buy), power usage is probably 1/2 the quoted spec. In other words, if you calibrate your TV for the best picture, the power draw of a plasma is similar to an LCD.

    On the other hand, LCD power draw is pretty much what is quoted because of how the pixels work.

    So the max draw power doesn't tell the whole story.

    I noticed they were illustrating this at Best Buy the other day with a couple of TVs set up on an end cap. They were both attached to a Kill-A-Watt meter, and the plasma that they had calibrated drew way less power than the one running out of the box settings.

    Manufactures set up the defaults of these TVs to be as bright as possible to show in the stores. Kinda like all music now is compressed to crap and mastered at high volume so that if it's played on the radio it stands out. :bang:
     
  8. Andrew

    Andrew Well-Known Member

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    This is really a separate issue but it kind of fits in here..

    Anyway, for whatever it's worth I have a 32" sharp LCD HDTV. I like it a lot, but I have one issue. I'm connecting to cable through a coaxial cable into some sort of wall jack in my dorm. With my old 19" HD LCD I got local HD channels (e.g. 9.1 is HD version of local channel 9), but on the new one I don't pick them up anymore. Any ideas why? I tried rescanning multiple times...

    BTW, I don't know if this was mentioned, but 720p = 1080i. This is the highest HD that is currently broadcast. 1080p is the next step up and is currently used only for HD DVD and Blu-Ray. I haven't seen it before, but from what I've heard it is better but only really noticeable on very large pictures, like at least 50+ inches.
     
  9. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    Actually I have had a Fujitsu 50" plasma for about seven years now and my wife hates not seeing the entire 4x3 format picture so she runs it a lot with big black bars on the sides (despite my showing her how to get gray ones). With my wife and on not always turning it off, it's gotten probably about five hours a day on average over the seven years - about 13,000 hours. So I've been expecting burn in on that early plasma, but I haven't actually noticed any yet. Part of this might be that I adjusted the brightness down to the room when we first got it.
     
  10. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    Probably have no unencrypted QAM in your new cable for it to use.

    You could try a small indoor HDTV antenna. Amazon sells some for $30.

    True, but having more pixels as in 1080P on a bigger set means you don't get the screen door effect due to denser pixels. And a lot of us run PCs through our TVs, so more pixels are good.

    But for smaller sets, 720P is probably indistinguishable.
     
    #30 MannishBoy, Mar 12, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2008

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