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How much weight can go upstairs?

Discussion in 'Gym Equipment' started by ekim22, Aug 29, 2006.

  1. ekim22

    ekim22 Active Member

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    We just moved into a new house out in the country. A trip to the gym every day isn't feasible with gas the way it is....

    So we've figured on having a home gym. Problem is, the available room we have is upstairs. It's a large room, something around 15 x 20 (has a few odd angles on the walls)...

    Anyways, I really don't want to have to use a bowflex or crossbow but will if it's a must....I'd rather have something like the ultimate smith machine....but I'm not sure how much weight is too much on a 2nd floor. We also want to put a treadmill up there and an ab chair.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. doordude42

    doordude42 Senior Member

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    Unless the house is made from matchsticks, I wouldn't sweat it.:tucool:
     
  3. Omaha

    Omaha Well-Known Member

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    A few thousand pounds no problem. Think of the weight of a heavily furnished room. The bed, the TV cabnet, the dresser, the desk, all the crap in the dresser and desk, the people in the room etc etc.


    As long as you would keep the total weight in that room under 2-3000 pounds I wouldn't see any problems at all. More if there is a supporting wall underneath the room.

    If you are really concerned you could talk with an architect in your area. Something like that could be taken care of over the phone I'm sure. That might be the best bet anyway.
     
  4. MarkY

    MarkY Active Member

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    The weights shouldn't be a problem. However, I'd avoid putting a treadmill up there. With all the pounding it will sound like a bad subwoofer to anyone downstairs. You might also have a problem with drywall screws popping off some plaster on the downstairs ceiling.
     
  5. TheRyanator

    TheRyanator Well-Known Member

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    I have always wondered the same thing. Our place spans the whole top floor of our townhome building and it is right over all the garages...thats all I need is a hole in my floor and a crushed BMW underneath. :nope:
     
  6. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    I've wondered about this due to some work loading stuff I deal with on heavy equipment in commercial spaces (800-1200 lbs in a 3 square foot area) where some older commercial space isn't designed for it.

    One thing somebody pointed out to me was the weight of a waterbed is probably just as heavy. I just keep my weights spread out across the room in different storage areas close to the load bearing walls.
     
  7. Omaha

    Omaha Well-Known Member

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    The center of a room is the weakest point, baring supporting walls/post located underneath the room.

    If you are worried about it, that should give you some piece of mind. The room will be strongest near the entry way (to my knowledge) and if it shares the outer wall of the house, that will be the stongest area.
     
  8. ekim22

    ekim22 Active Member

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    You guys & gals will get a kick out of this....

    I went to Dick's Sporting Goods today to purchase the strength machine I wanted. After months of scouting bowflexes, crossbows, smith machines, and other home equipment, I settled on the Ultimate Smith Machine II at Dick's. Better price than any of the other machines, just as many exercises, and no rods....real weight plates.

    Well, I get there and I start looking at it....and I wait 30 minutes to even see someone who works there. I flag that person down and they have no idea, it's not their dept...so they page the guy who's dept it is.

    He gets there and I ask if they have this machine in stock...and out of curiousity how much it weighs. (upstairs question)...

    He comes back and tells me it weighs 240lbs, which I know is wrong because I can look at the machine and tell it weighs atleast 300+...

    So he takes me back in the stock room to look and see if it's the right machine (didn't bother to think of checking the SKU #) and sure enough, it's not the same machine.

    He says he'll go ask his manager to see if it's in stock....uh ok...

    So he comes back and unfortunately it's not in stock.

    Okay, no problem, they can order me one right?

    Wrong.

    Yes, you read that correctly, they cannot order one. They have a display model sitting on the floor but they can't order me one?

    They offer to call another store and see if that store has one. No thanks, I'm not interested in driving an hour away from this store (which is already 30 minutes away from where I live)...

    I ask if he knows if they'll get one in stock.....nope he doesn't know.

    So I walk away dumbfounded....kinda shell shocked......speechless....

    Here I am a customer, ready to spend $1000 in your establishment on a piece of merchandise you have on your sales floor....and you basically tell me no, you can't sell it to me...


    Yea so uh.....time for plan B.
     
  9. Omaha

    Omaha Well-Known Member

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    You should have made an offer to the manager on the floor model. That's what I would have done.
     
  10. Blob

    Blob Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, not to question your choice, but for 1K I'd go with either a rack/bench combo or a WB/LS
     
  11. Blob

    Blob Well-Known Member

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    I was just thinking about the waterbed example (I used to own one - ahh, the '80s LOL) I don't know if its true, but someone told me that a refrigerator is even heavier in pounds per square foot than a waterbed. My guess is the only way to exceed the force of a refrigerator is when you are doing heavy squats/deads etc.
     
  12. aikidoka

    aikidoka Active Member

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    it really depends on how the weight is distributed. A water bed has a special frame that loads the floor less per sq. ft. than an avg. person does, as I recall. Also, where are actual load bearing walls located beneah that floor? I'm in an apt. upper floor and they had no problem with a water bed. I havent noticed any additional bounce or creaks in the floor with my open rack at the end of the bed. I'm not moving that much weight though. When I store them, I have the weight distributed a bit. No single stack of 300lbs. I suppose one could be concerned about each side of a rack coming down on the empty space between floor joists. I'm not sure what plywood subfloor can handle over say a 24" span but I can try and find out. It would be best if tsome floor joists either hit directly under the rack frame or ran perpendicular to the side rails to distribute the load.

    I think most floors we design at work are for a 40lb live load and 10lb dead load with 1/4" to 3/8" allowable deflection.

    here's info on wood framing. I work with light gauge steel but most residential is wood still.

    http://www.trimjoist.com/loads.html
     

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