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How do you know if you are doing to much weight training..

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by Monkey Boy, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. Monkey Boy

    Monkey Boy Active Member

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    Hi, since i got back to uni i have been going to the gym every day of the week for about 1.5-2 hours sometimes more.. (so far i've done this for 8-10 days in a row and would happly do the same again)

    I usually start to walm up on the rowing machine then move onto dumbells and work my way up to 15kg shoulder presses and 15-17.5kg bicept curls.. Just wondering if by going to the gym every day can have a negitive affect.. should i got less? so far i havent gotten any injuries and my arms arent sore or stiff the next day when i go bk to the gym.. The only negitive thing i have noticed is that i have minor stretch makes just around my armpit (which i think was already there from before i started going to the gym as much).

    What do you ppl think? keep lifting as often :bb: or take a breather? :sleep:
     
  2. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    Sounds like too much. You really want to have a rest day after any heavy workout. Otherwise you might not get the growth you were hoping for. You should be able to get the lifting down to three or four days a week.

    Try increasing the intensity of your workouts and not going every day.
     
  3. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

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    No way should you be spending that much time in the gym. BTW, how do you kill two hours just doing curls and shoulder presses? I hope that isn't your entire workout.

    In any case, you need to remember that growth and improvement does not happen in the gym -- but rather, it happens outside the gym when you are recovering. The gym just provides your muscles with the stimulus that tells them to grow and improve. If you are spending 2 hours per day in the gym with no days off, then when are your muscles allowed to recover and grow?

    Personally, I go to the gym 4 days per week, and am done with my workout in about an hour.
     
  4. Monkey Boy

    Monkey Boy Active Member

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    yea you guys are right.. probs best if i cut down abit.. well i spend 2 hours in the gym coz i start off on the rowing machine then work my way round the weight machines then onto the free weights.. then from there i do lots of different curls, presses etc
     
  5. Hockey4

    Hockey4 Active Member

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    Working out every day of the week is absolutely too much and detrimental to making progress in size and strength. Working out every day of the week and focusing on only presses and curls makes it even worse.

    Your body has to be seriously overtrained and your CNS has to be near fried. If that's not the case, then you're not lifting enough weight in the gym. And if you're lifting 14 hours a week with no weight, you're wasting time.

    I would recommend three days a week, focusing on different movements. For example, base one day around pushing exercises (bench, etc), one around pulling exercises (deadlift, etc), and then one around legs (squats, etc).

    Your body will thank you for it. Trust me.
     
  6. NEdge

    NEdge Well-Known Member

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    Unless you are taking ungodly amounts of steroids, or effectively periodizing your routine, I cannot see how you are putting in the effort (or 'intensity') that, IMO, you aught to be in the gym.

    Do less, but with more 'oomph'. You should be pretty much exhausted after 40-50 minutes of lifting. I realize you are young, but to to 8-10 days in a row of hours of exhaustive exercise seems like you'd want a break.

    If you have a good periodization going - i.e. alternating 'hard' and 'light' days with some days of just stretching and maybe some injury prevention exercises etc.. then I can see going to the gym for 10 days in a row. Even then I'd take a day or two completely off once in a while.
     
  7. Rise

    Rise Active Member

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    when you work out, do you squat, deadlift, do pullups, or dips?
     
  8. Monkey Boy

    Monkey Boy Active Member

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    Yes i also do pull ups, push ups and dips

    btw i dont do a full 2 hours on free weights.. usually spend the first hour walming up and on rowing, leg press, abs machines and a few others what i cant remember there names.. Then after that i move onto the weights and start on low weight (7-10kg) and lots of reps.. then take a few mins break betweeen sets.. then after that i work my way up.. and go for weight (10-17.5kg) but fewer reps.. inbetween all that i do pull ups and pushup and cable weights..
     
  9. Monkey Boy

    Monkey Boy Active Member

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    What do you mean by 'Your CNS has to be Near Fried'? What does CNS mean? central nervous system? Also please explain if that is the case why you think so? because if my CNS is almost 'fried' i fell quite ok lol :tu:
     
  10. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    Weighted rows? Squats? Deadlifts? Lunges? Any leg work at all?
     
  11. Monkey Boy

    Monkey Boy Active Member

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    i do leg press and rowing which is kinda legs.. but i think my lower body strength is ok.. as i use to do alot of running and cycling..
     
  12. andysutils

    andysutils Active Member

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    yep,wwwaayyyyy to much, you need to take some time off inbetween for recovery, otherwise you body will just become counter productive to it.

    But the main question i got is, what exactly is it your heading towards? Bulking, cutting or just generally maintaining your current state?
     
  13. odin1642

    odin1642 Active Member

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    How do farmers, blacksmiths, lumberjacks, riggers etc. grow big muscles if rest is required ? They're usually working at least five days a week for 8 hours plus a day. Is overtraining just a myth ?
     
  14. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    You are not providing near the work you need to to your lower body, then. You need to work in more leg/back work. Working the legs and back hard makes the most overall impact on your physique, because those are the biggest muscle groups in the body. Hitting the legs and back with things like squats and deadlifts causes the body to respond hormonally by releasing growth hormones in much greater quantities than doing little moves like curls. So if you want your body to grow or to get leaner, do deads and squats.

    Cardio does not provide the stimulus you'd want. How many marathoners have strong looking bodies or even legs?

    If you want biceps, squat.
     
  15. cajunman

    cajunman Well-Known Member

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    High volume of low- to moderate-intensity work, hitting the big muscles of the back and legs, with plenty of food.

    Overtraining is real, but I think 90% of people never experience it or experience very mild overtraining if anything. Too many people subscribe to the myth that a muscle needs total rest for 48-72 hours, which is not true.

    Manipulate intensity and frequency to attain total volume. If intensity or daily volume is low enough, you can train more frequently. Too high, you have to train less frequently (or increase work capacity).

    Regarding how you know when your training is too much: a reliable indicator of when to back off on training is when your rep speed begins to falter. Particularly true for the back, which can tolerate a fairly high volume of work (along with the legs).
     
  16. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    No. It's very real. Most people, however, just undergo symptoms of under recovery. Actual over-training is a prolonged inability to recover and has a whole mess of serious symptoms that will have to do with hormones, etc. If you can take a week off after running yourself down and bounce back, you were not overtrained -- just under recovered. On the other hand, if you take a month off, for example, and still haven't bounced back, you're more than likely overtrained.

    The body doesn't do well with extremes. Too much volume, too much intensity for too long is bad. If the body can't recover, it can't progress.

    Also, keep in mind that those farmers, blacksmiths, lumberjacks, riggers, etc. don't jump from a sedentary lifestyle to full-on doing their trade overnight. They start out as kids and apprentices, gradually receiving more work and responsibility over time. The body adapts over the years. This is how they are able to handle that 8+ hours five day per week schedule you mentioned. It's called building work capacity.

    As cajunman hinted, on average, at any moment during their work, the work itself is not nearly as intense as the average moment weight-training. However, doing it for hours and hours day in and day out is hard. Recovery from this type of work doesn't have the same requirements as recovery from weight-training.
     
    #16 chicanerous, Jan 22, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2008
  17. Monkey Boy

    Monkey Boy Active Member

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    My current stats are 5.10 tall, Lean 14'' biceps and 40'' chest ..

    My aim is to get my biceps to 16''+ in around 5 months (before im 19) and hopfully the rest of my body to look proportional..
     
  18. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    It won't be if you don't work the legs :D
     
  19. odin1642

    odin1642 Active Member

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    Thanks for your helpful responses re my queries about lumberjacks etc. as this was something I often wondered about.
     
    #19 odin1642, Jan 22, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2008
  20. timwalsh300

    timwalsh300 Well-Known Member

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    I can't believe nobody has asked this yet... are you progressing on this routine?

    We're all speculating about over-training, but I see no reason for it if it's working.

    I'm in the camp that believes the whole concept of over-training, in the clinical sense, has been blown way out of proportion by beginners who read too much. I don't see any beginner training with the requisite weights or intensity to bring it on, in my opinion. Real intensity has to be learned and developed - you don't start with it. When you are lifting light weights (even if they are "heavy" for you), I don't think you can over-train and fry your CNS. The CNS is mainly what is being trained anyway, from what I understand. And there is so much room for growth. Beginners can, and often do, progress very rapidly on this kind of high volume, high frequency routine. I know that I did. I'm sure that someone else here did too. Wait until the progress starts to slow and you are throwing around some serious weight (like Zen) before worrying about over-training.

    That said, the OP's routine could definitely use some help. I have no doubt that he could make more efficient use of his time in the gym, and beginning to squat and deadlift is a must.

    Tim
     

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