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Home made squat rack - IT'S EASY!

Discussion in 'Gym Equipment' started by stefanjagger, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. stefanjagger

    stefanjagger Active Member

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    Hi All,

    Just finished putting my rack together which took about an hour in total. Cost about £40 but you can probably find some cheap scaffolding laying around, at the side of some road, or maybe on a building site or something... :confused:

    Been thinking of a scaffolding pole + concrete slabs for weights or I might just buy some with the money i'll save not going to the gym :)

    DSC00296.jpg
     
  2. SOULFLY

    SOULFLY Well-Known Member

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    haha beautiful!:tu:
     
  3. Doubleoqueso

    Doubleoqueso Active Member

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  4. KT Monahan

    KT Monahan Active Member

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    For your sake, let's hope it works.
     
  5. squatguy20

    squatguy20 Active Member

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    Looks really cool, although I'm still going to be buying a powertec power rack . I would rather just spend the money and then I know it will be well designed, stable etc. (If I knew more about scaffold I would probably just build one like yours tho.)

    Can you use the horizontal bar at the top for chins?
    How much weight can the scaffold take?
     
  6. gitoutmyi

    gitoutmyi Active Member

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    im not quite sure what he used to hold the scaffolding together but normal scaffolding is built to hold 1000s of pounds of brick and mortor and other building materials so the bars themselves are strong im sure. dunno about the joints ha
     
  7. kevin_in_ga

    kevin_in_ga Active Member

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    Maybe I'm missing something ... how do you step out of the rack with the bar on your back? Looks like you need to cut some of the scaffolding to let you use this. Also, I would be careful about the bar at the bottom on the open side - you'll need to step over this with weights, and at the end of your set this could be tricky.
     
  8. Guillerr

    Guillerr Active Member

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    You don't really need to step out of it, since it's pretty big. Still, you could cut some of the scaffolding.

    Great job!
     
  9. kevin_in_ga

    kevin_in_ga Active Member

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    I'm assuming that the only visible crossbar supports the BB and weights - you slide in under it, get the weight up on your back, and step forward to perform the squat. Afterwards, you step back into the cage and return the weiggt to its original position? Is this incorrect? If so, how do you get the bar past the upright poles in the fromt?
     
  10. squatguy20

    squatguy20 Active Member

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    I think you are missing something....

    Why would you need to step out of the rack with a bar on your back?
    It's designed for squatting INSIDE the rack. The bar is clearly meant to be racked inside the rack.

    Look at the second picture here (the top right one), that is what the bar rests on:
    http://www.joeskopec.com/scaffold.html
     
  11. kevin_in_ga

    kevin_in_ga Active Member

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    Got it. I understand what you're saying now. Thanks for clearing this up.
     
  12. stefanjagger

    stefanjagger Active Member

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    Hi All,

    Great comments... in response to some questions (im at work so gotta be brief)

    Scaffolding is held together by scaffold clips, can pick them up for a few pounds... they're made for the job and can hold loads of weight. As mentioned bricks and allsorts held on them usually.

    Top bar is used for chinup/pullups yep, works a treat as well, even under my weight (190lbs), didn't even shake.

    The bars can hold plenty of weight, more than enough. When I get past 150kg i'd probably buy a purpose built rack anyway.

    The link posted is where I got the idea... I just put more braces in place to support it and make the piece more solid.

    Cheers, Stefan
     
  13. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

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    As squatguy mentioned, you squat in the squat cage, not out of it.

    Further, get under the bar and step back with the weight. Not forward.

    Otherwise, you'll find yourself in a potentially dangerous situation when attempting to re-rack the bar.
     
  14. Foley

    Foley Well-Known Member

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    Time to test it with some weight man. ;)
     
  15. stefanjagger

    stefanjagger Active Member

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    Yea, i'm a bit of money away from that... unless you can bring some round? :D

    Hope to have my set of weights next pay day! :bb:
     
  16. kevin_in_ga

    kevin_in_ga Active Member

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    I have exposed my complete ignorance of squatting - the last time I squatted was 25 years ago, so forgive my failing memory!!
     
  17. joe42

    joe42 Active Member

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    I dunno, those clips holding the crossbars worry me a LOT. Unless I'm missing something, there's nothing but smooth friction holding those up. Drop a heavy bar on those and you are likely to have the whole thing collapse. Looks dangerous.

    At the very least, I'd recommend drilling some holes, and putting some pins through that bar, so there's more than just friction holding it together.

    (Yes, I know those clips are used for scaffolding, but dropping a bunch of weight like that isn't what these are designed for.)
     
  18. stefanjagger

    stefanjagger Active Member

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    Good suggestion Joe, I might just drill a hole and bolt it in although it would take quite a decent drill to get through the scaffold couplings.

    Taken from: http://www.joeskopec.com/scaffold.html
    "How much weight can the J Hooks hold? I have loaded 150 kg (330 lbs) onto the bar on the J Hooks and then sat on the bar and it felt ok. Although after a couple of years use and regularly putting 150kg on for squat overloads, one started to bend so I changed it round."

    I honestly don't think that it will struggle under my current squat weight (60kg) or even upto the 150kg mark. At which point i'll invest in a squat rack :tu:

    It's just a great, cheap way for new comers to get a vital bit of kit required for a decent training plan.

    It'd be interesting to hear about other improvised kit people have discoverd.
     
  19. fullpen

    fullpen Active Member

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    it may not struggle under a static load, but what about an impact? you should weld it up.
     
  20. RTE

    RTE Well-Known Member

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    How do you build legs?
     

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