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Help ! I'm terrible at lifting

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by v2003, Jan 22, 2004.

  1. v2003

    v2003 Well-Known Member

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    Hey there,
    Just wondering can anyone answer a question for me.

    Ive never lifted weights before and i only started about 2 weeks ago.
    All i can bench press is about 30 Kg (66lb)
    Is this is terrible for a beginner ?

    I just wanted to know opinions.

    I can do a seated leg press of 260 lb though.

    Please let me know if this is bad or good or ok

    Thanks guys
    V
     
  2. moeamaya

    moeamaya Well-Known Member

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    We all have to start somewhere and the important thing is that you have started. I know it may seem a long way away but as the weeks progress so too should your muscle growth, especially as a beginner. Be consistent, lift with intensity, have proper nutrition, and you will see results
     
  3. Razor

    Razor Well-Known Member

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    Whatever you can lift is whatever you can lift. Starting out, it's never bad. Keep gradually increasing it and eventually, you'll be able to lift quite a bit.
     
  4. CuttinKing2183

    CuttinKing2183 Well-Known Member

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    Yea, u gotta start somewhere...

    and, in my opinion, the amount someone can bench press never really impresses me.
     
  5. PxT

    PxT Well-Known Member

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    I think this is a fine place to start. I started at a bench-press of only 60lbs (2x30lb dumbells) at 10 reps -- partly because those were the heaviest I had available at the time. You will quickly find that you can add weight if you are consistent with your workouts. Don't be afraid to add the weight as you improve.
     
  6. Super Fink

    Super Fink Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't matter how much you can or cant bench - it matters how you feel about you. I have a good friend who only benches about 200lbs, but he is JACKED! Muscular and cut - the amount doesn't make a difference, its results that matter!
     
  7. Mahdimael

    Mahdimael Well-Known Member

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    Yep, just keep training and eventually you'll get to where you want to be. I started out being able to bench press 70 lbs in high school, but by my senior year I was doing over 300 lbs. All that matters is that you keep with it and don't worry about what others are doing.
     
  8. brownguy

    brownguy Well-Known Member

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    Think of it this way -- you're going to be making some incredible gains!
     
  9. funtax

    funtax Well-Known Member

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    It may seem low, especially if you've been reading up on weight training on various websites and such. Bear in mind that those sites are usually aimed at hardcore powerlifters/bodybuilders/etc. and, as a result, they tend to start off with things like "warming up with 4x12 at 180 lbs" and such in their examples.

    This leads me to the one lesson that took me a long time to learn:

    Don't be intimidated by what other people are doing. Even better, don't care at all about what other people are doing or about what they think of you. You're in the gym to get in shape and so are they. Chances are very good that they don't care if you're benching 50 lbs or 500 lbs.

    As a side note, you may want to try warming up differently if you feel that your bench is unusually low. I've found that using the MaxOT lifting method has enabled me to add a fair amount of weight to most of my main lifts, simply by warming up differently.

    In the end, lift what works for you and focus on improving yourself, not on how much iron you're pushing around.
     
  10. Jingo

    Jingo Well-Known Member

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    i don't know if you're at home or in a gym but the most important thing to remember is, everyone there is selfish and egotistical! or atleast that's how i think when in a gym.

    harsh? no :) all it means is, they only care about themselves and their own gains, it feels like everyone is watching you, but they really aren't, they're too busy getting on with their work outs to improve themselves.

    The weight you lift isn't important, only the percentage of your max you're lifting. If 30 is the most you can lift, then you're going to build up muscles by lifting it and that's a good thing!

    Don't try to conform to what others expect or what you see, we're all different and the only way you'll improve your own body is by focusing on your own capabilities and improvements.
     
  11. v2003

    v2003 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the support lads.
     
  12. muzzi

    muzzi Well-Known Member

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    I started off on _20kg__!!! I am now on 50kg just a few months later.

    I am underweight though, at just under 60kg. I am 19.

    Anyway, the point I am making is this, you can only get better!

    but please, TAKE IS SLOWLY!! Don't rush into heavier weights than what you are capable of, you will only end up injuring yourself. I found this out the hard way and had to stop lifting for almost a month :(
     
  13. Scott

    Scott Well-Known Member

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    I'm afraid I'm not going to offer much new commentary on this one, so I might give you an example of the person you're afraid of.

    Often times in the gyme (I'm in college, so it's a college gym) There are the types who go in just to show off. Call him, ahnold. Ahnold will do the most visible and most impressive weights (bench press, curls, etc.) and do them. Maybe ahnold will pick up two 80 lb. dumbells and then do a couple of bench presses with them or something like that. but that's just the point, he's showing off his max lift. He'll do maybe one set of ten or more likely a set of five and then move on to the next one. He's not working out and laddering his workout, so he's not really gaining anything. Ahnold then gets up and seems to stare everyone down. But, like everyone on this post has said, no one cares. If you're determined and focused on progress and not actual size, then you'll be incredibly proud of yourself. The weight don't matter, it's the change that does. So keep focused on yourself and progress.

    I've always been a fan of documentation. Bring a piece of paper, graph paper, whatever and write down what you do that day then enter it in worksheet, or even jot it in a dedicated notebook. Once you've done a couple months the progress will really be a big motivator for you.

    good luck!

    -Scott
     
  14. double00

    double00 Well-Known Member

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    V2003,

    I started out with a 65 lbs bench too. It took me a couple of weeks to get used to the balancing of the free weights. Within 9 months I was lifting my body weight.

    I also did a lot of push ups at first too. I thought it helped me in the
    beginning. I set these goals initially: first 10 push ups at once. Then gradually I moved up to 25, then 3X25, then 50, then 2X50, then 75, and finally I hit 100. Sometimes I would put my hands on a small stack of textbooks so that I can drop my chest lower and get a great stretch at the bottom. I thought this helped boost my bench a little.

    I wasn't too concerned about pressing crazy weight at first either. What I wanted to do was have good form. So I agree with the other posters here...concentrate on being persistant and patient and compare youself only to yourself and you should be fine.

    Good luck on your progress.
     
    #14 double00, Jan 25, 2004
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2004
  15. map200uk

    map200uk Well-Known Member

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    hey guys,

    glad to see so many people thinking in the same mindframe as me, its not how much u bench, its what your max is,

    i can bench enough for me, sure its not a world record and people CAN do more, but its enough for me

    one thing to remember is, you will often see people at your gym who will go from say a 50kg bench to maybe 100 to showoff, and only manage say 1-2 reps, if even that, ive seen it happen loads here anyway.

    The simple reason is as someone said before, people have egos and they get obsessed with weight.

    Just do whats right for you and ensure correct form

    good luck bro:)

    Mark
     

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