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Healthy Heart Post-Stent, Yet Pain from Lifting

Discussion in 'General Health/Fitness & Injuries' started by Jimmy Fiore, Sep 16, 2019.

  1. Jimmy Fiore

    Jimmy Fiore Well-Known Member

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    I understand this is not a place for medical advice. I'm under the care of a cardiologist, and follow his instructions carefully. I'm here looking for corroboration, and ideas I can run past my cardiologist, who's stumped.

    I got a cardiac stent 5 years ago after a mild heart attack that was caught early. My echo cardiogram shows a normal "clench" ratio, so very little damage was done. Stress tests and EKGs have all been perfect. No symptoms and I've never needed to use nitroglycerin.

    With my doctor's approval, I recently returned to the gym, using comparatively lighter weights and lots of reps, never working to failure. I breathe a lot. After a rigorous month of daily workouts, I was getting increasingly painful stabbing pain in heart area at night. One day while doing bicep curls (with particularly low weight!), each rep brought greater pain.

    Cardiologist brought me in for EKG, x-ray, echo, and running stress test. All absolutely normal. He insists it's not my heart. But I don't have a cracked rib or a strained intercostal muscle. No movement can recreate this pain; only resistance training. I'm sure it's my heart.

    With doctor approval, I returned to gym after a couple weeks, with even less weight and staying even further away from failure. After 2 or 3 workouts, I started getting stirrings in my chest again. I've stopped all weight-lifting. Aerobic workouts continue with no problem.

    Has anyone experienced anything like this, and/or have a theory to propose that I can take back to my doctor? FWIW he's board certified and highly respected at an excellent hospital. I believe he's wrong, but he's not incompetent.
     
  2. macdiver

    macdiver Well-Known Member
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    My only advice is to get a second opinion from either a sports medicine specialist or another cardiologist.
     
  3. George

    George Senior Member

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    That is pretty strange. I have personally never heard of it, and I work in a rehab setting with a lot of cardiac patients.

    A potential data point for the doctor that might be useful is to wear a heart rate monitor during endurance vs. Resistance exercise and see if anything unusual comes up.

    Out of curiosity, what are you doing for cardio? If you do fairly low intensity stuff, I almost wonder if something is going on as a result of big spikes in heart rate and/or blood pressure.

    I second the idea of getting a second opinion from someone a lot smarter than me.
     
  4. George

    George Senior Member

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    Also, this is a long shot, but are you taking any preworkout stimulants for lifting?
     

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