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Goal: Want to make my cardio 5 mile run consecutive

Discussion in 'Fat Loss/Cutting' started by JNS055, Nov 9, 2004.

  1. JNS055

    JNS055 Well-Known Member

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    I want to be able to do this within 30 minutes. Any advice on training to do this besides just doing it. Like interevals and stuff?

    I was capable of running a mile in 4 years ago in 5 minutes but couldnt run consecutive ones Now I want to get that back plus doing them consecutive.
     
  2. Hort

    Hort Well-Known Member

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    How wold are you?

    5 miles at an average of 6 is a pretty good clip- you'll want to just keep pushing endurance- I'd suggest running a timed shorter interval, say 2 miles and work to up your time. Then do 3 miles timed, etc.

    Of course- if you're in good shape now- Just go out there and push- watch your watch and see just how realistic it is. If your heart is outside of your chest after 2 miles you'll now how far you have to go.

    I did a sub 4:30 mile once... but that was 24 years ago. :o
     
  3. AMR

    AMR Well-Known Member

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    What is your current running routine like? How many miles a week do you run? Do you do Long runs, recovery runs, tempo runs and speed workouts?

    And to be honest, I'm not really sure what it is that you're asking. You want to get back to being able to run a 5 minute mile? Consecutive? Not really sure what you mean.

    More info please.
     
  4. klauslov

    klauslov Well-Known Member

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    Training Schedules

    Hi,

    I have used the Nike running programmes and was very happy with them. Not sure at which level you are at now but maybe it can help - check http://www.nikerunning.com/ > Tools > Training Schedules

    Good luck

    Cheers
    Klaus
     
  5. JNS055

    JNS055 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for info you have all been great. I can only run around 8 minute mile and have trouble running more than one consecutive. I want to train myself to get where I was in high school and then run them consecutively. I want to be able to make running my primary cardio form and I want to run for 30minutes hard and as best as I can.

    Thanks.

    Dont know if you understand but thats best as I can put it.
     
  6. pduck

    pduck Well-Known Member

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    If you are only able to run an 8 minute mile right now, you've got a long way to go before you can run 5 miles in 30 minutes. Considering that you have run a mile in 5 minutes, you have the necessary speed, but you are out of shape. For now, you should concentrate on long runs of 30-60 minutes. Run 30-45 minutes during the week and then put in a longer 50-60 minutes run on the weekend. After you have gotten to the point where you can run for 40-45 minutes with no problems, you might want to try a fartlek once a week (a long, contiuous run where you vary the pace and put in surges). Take a day off every once in a while to let your legs rest.
     
  7. 1FastGTX

    1FastGTX Elite Member
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    UNBELIEVABLE. THANK YOU!
     
  8. quackvader

    quackvader Well-Known Member

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    This is a site I was using while building up to a 5k. It was a pretty helpful site. The link goes to what they call their "couch to 5k plan", although if you're not quite at couch level you can just pick this up midway i'd guess.

    http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml

    I realize a 5k isn't 5 miles, but it's a start and once you have the process adding shouldn't be an issue. They have alot of resources on that site, train you for 5k, 10k, marathon.

    Good site from my experience with it. It's one of those things that will take you several months I think, unless you've got a pretty steady base already. I stated with a mile and was adding about 1/4 a mile every week/week 1/2 so at that rate for me you can see how long building to 5 miles would take.
     
  9. quackvader

    quackvader Well-Known Member

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    Another thing the site has is a free log if you sign up. You can input your time/distance into it and then do graphs and projections and totals and whatnot on it.

    Very helpful for us that love tracking progress to keep motivated.
     
  10. furches

    furches Well-Known Member

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  11. girlcop1

    girlcop1 Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I didn't read every post but here is what I did and it worked. I run further one day than normal and then the next run for speed. Meaning run two miles as fast as you can. I have ran a ten mile race in 80 minutes, I thought this was pretty good. I could at that time run my two miles in 13:30, as you can see it doesn't add up. The key to distance running is getting used to the feeling of actually running those miles, then remember, you will not be able to keep the same pace for every mile. For some the first couple are faster for others it is the last couple. It is ultimatley what the time comes out to be in the end, then they average. For me a five mile run consist of two fast miles, two slow miles and the last mile somewhere in between. Example: first two at 7 minute pace, second two at 8 minute pace, last mile at 7:15, for a total time of 37:15, on average about 7:30 for each. Run a slow long run (a mile or two more than usual, but slower) one day and the next day run a short fast run, a couple miles less than the slow one, but all the miles are approximately the same pace. Once your body grows accustomed to the distance, you will be able to run a shorter run faster. For example do a 7 mile run at a 8 minute pace, then do a 4 mile run at a 7 minute pace. Also try hills in your long run, it helps to use different muscles so that when you are running a flat run it seems easier and is easier to speed up. Good luck, that is very ambitious.
     

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