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Get Buffed by Ian King

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by Barber, Nov 28, 2005.

  1. GRCRYSTYK

    GRCRYSTYK Well-Known Member

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    Sets and reps,..

    Hmm,..This is all very interesting,..I better get myself a couple of these books you all refer to,...:read:

    >>>--->
     
  2. freddyaudiophile

    freddyaudiophile Well-Known Member

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    So what would you recommend in terms of stretching?

    I'm going to sit down this afternoon and redo my current program on a 5-day split: lift 3 days on (M, Tu, W), 1 off (Th), 2 on (F, Sa), 1 off (Su) with no workout lasting longer than 12 sets.

    Also, I was not planning to count my warm-up sets. Should I?

    Freddy
     
  3. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

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    i might invest in get buffed
     
  4. Yips

    Yips Well-Known Member

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    Bump

    I'd be interested to know also :tucool:
     
  5. TylerGred

    TylerGred Well-Known Member

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    Does anybody know of any other places to order this book? It's 60 bucks at King Sports...

    That's a lot of money for a book.
     
  6. bradh

    bradh Well-Known Member

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    Look in JSF's shop. The Banner is on top of this page.
     
  7. JeremyLikness

    JeremyLikness Well-Known Member

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    It's not sold through Amazon. He self-publishes it.

    Honestly, $60 is a steal for this book. Many experienced trainers would charge twice that for an hour, and this is something you can keep and use day after day. In fact, people invest $500 in personal training programs and learn less than what you can receive from this book.

    I had his entire library shipped from Australia - all of the books, videos, etc. I still haven't found any other resource with so much quality information about training in one place ... nowhere, not my certifications, not online courses, nowhere else. Best investment I ever made, probably quadrupled my value as a trainer.

    Jeremy

     
  8. bradh

    bradh Well-Known Member

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    Cool, maybe i should get it. You can get it for 39.95 on t-nation thou. :tucool:
     
  9. Skoorb

    Skoorb Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that's quite the recommendation!
     
  10. TylerGred

    TylerGred Well-Known Member

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    Just started reading Get Buffed and it's a really good book. I also invested in his Ab Workout, Stretching, and Control Drills DVD's. While I'm a little disappointed in the quality of the DVD's (Burned DVD-R's), the information on the DVD's is incredible. Like I said, I hate that they are burned DVD's as I have had trouble playing some of them on DVD players, but then again I understand that it probably wouldn't be a practical move for him to get these professionally made.

    So far I love Get Buffed though and will probably buy the other two books...

    I have a question for Jeremy or anyone else who's read the book. Someone like me just trying to get lean and cut, would you advise I follow the path of stability/control& General Fitness or strength/hypertrophy as far as the number of reps/sets goes??
     
  11. JeremyLikness

    JeremyLikness Well-Known Member

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    Getting lean is a calories game, and you'll definitely burn more calories on the strength/hypertrophy track.

    Jeremy

     
  12. chris0374

    chris0374 Active Member

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    This is a old post but I'm thinking of investing in Get Buffed. I'm doing this to get good training knowledge to make optimal progress. I was wondering though, does this book only focus on weight training or also teaches you how to lose fat?
     
  13. NEdge

    NEdge Well-Known Member

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    Since this got resurrected:


    "Generally speaking, any number of work sets exceeding a total of 12 for the workout (yes, that's right, 12 sets for the total workout, not per muscle group!) should only be contemplated by those with optimal lifestyles and recovery conditions. If you have a day job and/or consider your recovery to be average, this rules you out. So, when you put together your program, choosing eight or more exercises for the workout and combining them with the old "3x" standard, you automatically have a number of sets equaling 24 or more for the workout."

    I was thinking about this and I definitely have been doing more than 12 working sets.

    Then I thought, well yes, but definitely not more than 100 working reps (because I've been working in sets of 2-5 reps).

    Then I thought about past workouts and came to the conclusion that I really don't like this whole paragraph. I think it is because I'm very into periodization. In fact most of my workout notes are to do with allowing me to easily track overall volume and intensity over weeks and months. The above paragraph to me is way too limiting. I think it would be OK for most people to do more than Ian prescribed here, but not necessarily for any great length of time and it has to allow back-off time.

    I guess I have mixed feelings about this whole topic. I would suggest most beginners sacrifice quantity over quality - i.e they should generally do much more warm-up work and much fewer working sets than is typical. And stop as soon as quality starts to suffer, rather than reducing weight and beating themselves into the ground to total exhaustion.
     
  14. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    I disagree with this.
     
  15. JeremyLikness

    JeremyLikness Well-Known Member

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    It was this paragraph (and Ian's mentoring) that led me to believe that most traditional methods are way overblown. So, I started prescribing fewer sets as per that paragraph. I had several clients that would complain, "But I'm doing less, yada yada" but after trying it out, invariably they become converts of the concept because they found they recovered more quickly and had similar if not improved strength and mass gains while doing less volume.

    So, no, I have not conducted independent clinical trials, etc, but I've found the norm is for people to exceed those amounts of sets and that whenever I cut back volume of training, people get results ... and save time in the gym as well.

    So, again, he's not saying for EVERYONE, just for people who don't have optimal recovery. That part is important because even if you do have a day job, etc, if you have the right genetics, or a strong knowledge of nutrition and recovery, you may fall into the category that gets away with the higher volume.

    It's not that you won't see success, but my experience is you'll be able to achieve the same success with far less work, and in some cases actually achieve superior results by allowing the body to recover rather than annihilating the central nervous system during the workout.

    Jeremy
     
  16. zenpharaohs

    zenpharaohs Elite Member
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    I think the other side of the coin is that you can do quite a lot to change your recovery if it is not that good.

    And improving recovery basically means doing at least one, probably two, workouts a week, that get you some decent time above the lactate threshold, and which also put a significant drain on your glycogen store.

    Once you get in half decent shape, I agree that the 12 sets will be easy to recover from. You will see nice muscle gains.

    You won't see hardly any liver gains though, especially if you have raised the lactate threshold a bit. And the liver is as important as anything in recovery.

    Any time you put a limit on the volume of a workout that you intend to fully recover from, you are pretty much putting a ceiling on where your overall metabolic capacity.
     
  17. HevyMetal

    HevyMetal Well-Known Member

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    o.k....so 12 working sets....

    But what about rep total?

    and failure points?

    Let's say it's "leg day" and all you're going to do is squat.

    You decide to do 12 sets of 20, but not to failure....you're pyrammiding up starting at about 40 percent of the max weight you'll use that day.

    so you've done 12 sets but your rep total is 240.

    if you did 12 sets of 15 reps thats 180 reps.

    if you did 12 sets of 3 reps thats 36.

    I believe I read somewhere that Ellington Darden figured about 145 to 150 reps per workout was the upper max limit as far as he was concerned.

    But keeping the 12 set principle in mind, this could be 3 ex'x at 4sets apiece or it could be 2 ex's at 6 sets or it could be 1 ex at 12 sets etc.

    But as stated earlier the 3x10 routine isn't the only game in town by a longshot.
     

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