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gazareth's journal

Discussion in 'Fitness Journals' started by gazareth, Oct 7, 2013.

  1. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    Training run (yesterday)
    3.7 miles @ 9:59 pace
    First run for a month.

    Haven't lifted since 21st April. Could do with getting that going again. I have been playing a lot of cricket and the impact of bowling has stopped me from running for the last month. I need to slowly ramp that up again as I have the half-marathon on 11th October.

    Weight has crept up a bit (I haven't weighed in for a couple of weeks but I'm likely around 204-205 at the moment), so I've tightened my diet again this week. I've got an intermediate goal of making sure that my suit fits for a wedding in early September.
     
  2. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    I got into watching the 20-over matches in some league that I think is in the Caribbean (teams are from Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, etc) on WatchESPN. I think I finally get all the rules and scoring and such, but then I tried to watch some recent contest between England and Australia (a "test" match, I think?), and it just blew my mind and I couldn't wrap my head around the scoring again. :cry:

    It looks like fun. When I lived in Columbus, OH, they used to have games on Ohio State's campus every now and again. I've always wanted to try it. :dreamy:
     
  3. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    :dreamy:

    "Test match" is right. Test cricket is (IMO) the purest and best form of the game. Matches last for 5 days (a day is typically 6 hours of play with a few breaks and they're supposed to get 90 overs in, but sometimes it doesn't happen). Each team has two innings and the innings is finished when either ten batsmen are out (11 in a team and you have to always have two batsmen in at once) or the batting team declares. The winner is the team that has the highest cumulative total runs after both teams have batted twice. If all the innings are not complete at the end of day 5, the match is a draw (surprisingly common, often due to adverse weather or favourable batting conditions which make it difficult to bowl a team out).

    It's not quite that simple, e.g. sometimes teams only bat once. Example:
    Team A scores 150 runs in their 1st innings
    Team B scores 500 runs in their 1st innings
    Team A scores 300 runs in their 2nd innings
    Team B doesn't have to bat again because they are still in front. In this case they would be said to have won by an innings. I guess this is similar to when in baseball the home side is winning going into the bottom of the 9th and doesn't need to bat again.

    There's also the concept of the "follow-on" (nothing to do with shitting your pants). If the team batting second doesn't get within 200 runs of the team batting first's total, they could be asked to bat again straightaway. Example:
    Team A scores 550 runs in their 1st innings
    Team B scores 200 runs in their 1st innings
    Team A leads by 350 and is therefore entitled to ask Team B to bat again immediately
    Team B scores 400 runs in their 2nd innings (if they scored fewer than 350 they would have lost by an innings)
    Team A has to score 51 runs to win the match

    Test matches tend to be part of series. England are currently playing Australia in what is generally considered to be the most prestigious test series. This time there's 5 matches and it's 1-1 after 2. The 3rd test started today :spaz: England lost 5-0 in Australia in 2013/14 but won 3-0 in England in 2013.
     
  4. leftyx

    leftyx Senior Member

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    Cool Gaz

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
     
  5. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    Incredibly, that all made perfect sense to me! Now I'm thinking of pulling that match up on ESPN today. :dreamy:

    That explanation also clears something up for me when I was watching that league's title game last night (on replay -- it was Trinidad and Tobago against Barbados, I think. Red Steel versus Tridents. They have cool nicknames. :tucool:). The Red Steel were batting first, and their opening batsman had gotten out (that's probably not the right vernacular -- the bowler took his wicket with a spinner that literally took out the wicket when the batsman missed, which I've found to be rare, despite the fact it seems like the primary goal), but their second and third guys were rolling. They'd combined for something like 110 runs on maybe 80 balls, and the innings was in the 16th over. The next two Red Steel batsmen were Darren and Dwayne Bravo, the latter of whom I've heard of and is supposed to be pretty darn good. In any case, they showed their strike rates, and they were like 130 or something, which seems solid (that's number of runs per 100 balls, right?). So I was trying to figure out if the Red Steel were allowed, in this format, to just pull a batsman and bring in the next guy if they wanted. While the second and third guys were doing well, they weren't as good as the Bravo boys, and the fielding team would be happy if they weren't getting them out but they weren't piling up runs, either.

    It ended up moot, because the Tridents got two wickets in the 16th over, bringing both Bravo boys to bat, and then the floodgates opened. Dwayne Bravo I think finished (not out) with something like a 210 strike rate. I actually haven't watched the Tridents' innings yet to see if they were able to match, but I'm pretty sure the Red Steel won the title.

    Anyway, in test matches, EVERYONE is going to bat (unless the middle guys, who I understand are usually the strongest batsmen, pile up so many runs the batting team declares), so it's not an issue. Kind of gives the 20-over contests a little wrinkle.

    I'll never get soccer, but I loves me some cricket. :madpimp:

    UPDATE: Found the third test. I like how in these contests everyone is pimped out in white with sweater vests and the like. One other thing I haven't figured out is the signals from the refs/umpires/officials.

    Oooo! Man, the technology they're using now is cray. They can determine if, for example, the ball would've really hit the wicket if the batsman's leg hadn't gotten in the way. They just dismissed a batsman on a call like that, but it was being "reviewed." I can't imagine the arguments back when they didn't have that technology.
     
    #565 volleyball, Jul 29, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2015
  6. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    No, you got that right. Bowlers are nominally trying to hit the stumps but as you say, it's relatively rare as a mode of dismissal. In test cricket at least, you'll see bowlers trying to get batsmen to "nick off", i.e. they'll try to bowl and get the ball to move sideways (either in the air or after bouncing) so that the ball just hits the edge of the bat and presents a catching chance to the wicket keeper or a slip fielder. Most decent batsmen can block balls aimed at the stumps pretty reliably, so catches behind the stumps and LBW are more common. T20 is another animal simply because of how aggressively the batsmen will tend to play (typical run rates in T20 are 7-10 runs per over whereas Test matches tend to be 2-3 on average), so you'll see more catches in the outfield, run outs etc, and the odd bowled.

    In theory, batsmen can "retire", meaning they end their innings voluntarily. A captain or coach could request that a batsman does this, but I don't think I've ever seen this happen in a proper match. In reality the only times you'll see someone retire are:
    Retired hurt - batsman gets hit by the ball or pulls a muscle or something and is unable to continue. If they recover they are allowed to continue batting at the fall of a wicket (e.g. they could go to hospital, get stitched up and come back later)
    Retired out - sometimes in non-competitive matches batsmen will retire after they've spent enough time getting batting practice to let someone else have a go. This usually happens when an international team is touring another country and is playing a warm-up match vs a domestic team
    Retired not out - pretty much only happens in friendly mid-week games in low-level club matches. For example, I'm playing tomorrow evening in a T20 game and it's not uncommon for us to agree with the opposition that batsmen will retire when they reach 25 runs - they can come back later if everyone else is out. This is just to make sure that as many people as possible get a go. This doesn't happen in our weekend league matches.

    I have played in many games where my team has deliberately tried to avoid getting a batsman out because they are scoring slowly.

    Yep, most of the time everyone will bat. Whereas in T20 or 50-over matches you might want to avoid getting someone out if they aren't scoring quickly, in test cricket you need to take wickets to win the match. The best batsmen in history (Brian Lara, Viv Richards, Don Bradman, Sachin Tendulkar) have tended to be middle-order players, but there have been plenty of brilliant openers as well (Matthew Hayden, Gordon Greenidge, Geoffrey Boycott, Virender Sehwag). They play different roles - in test cricket the ball tends to behave very differently for the first 20-25 overs so you need a different skill-set to bat in the top 2 or 3. So generally, the openers are good against a potentially swinging ball (moving sideways in the air) and have good defensive technique, whereas the middle-order would be more aggressive, better stroke-makers and usually better players of spin bowling. The modern game and the introduction of T20 has turned this on its head a bit and you'll still find plenty of opening batsmen in test cricket who play aggressively and with a less-than-textbook technique (e.g. David Warner of Australia).
    In T20, opening is all about taking advantage of the powerplay where the fielding side can only have two players outside the 30-yard circle, so openers need to be capable of hitting big shots, often aerially in order to beat the in-field. Defensive technique is pretty much irrelevant.



    --

    You should totally tune in to the test match. After getting panned in the 2nd match, England are playing really well so far today and Australia are 119 for 9 (it depends on the conditions but usually anything below 300 is considered a poor total for a 1st innings of a test match).
     
  7. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    Do a Google image search for "cricket umpire signals" and there are loads of examples.

    They had the technology for reviewing LBWs for a few years before they started actually using it (i.e. the TV companies would use it but it wasn't available to the umpires). That caused a lot more controversy than before the tech was available at all, to be honest. Meanwhile for folks like me who just plays club cricket for fun, every single LBW decision is something of a crap-shoot!
     
  8. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    Oh, I'm getting nothing done at the moment. :o Although WatchESPN just crapped out on me, so now I can't see anything. I did watch it through the last three wickets. That James Anderson fellow is apparently quite an excellent bowler. :dreamy:

    I noticed all three of Englands's bowlers were fast (as opposed to spin), and Australia's opening bowler was another fast bowler. Do spinners get much love in test matches?

    That's a great point about the aggressiveness of T20, and it makes total sense. There's a bit of urgency when you know you're only getting 120 balls, whereas in test cricket you can be defensive and not worry too much about dots.

    (Did I use that right? Are those the balls that no runs are scored on?)
     
  9. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    Yep, "dot balls" because when you complete the scorebook you put a "dot" (.) to denote that nothing happened on that ball.

    In test cricket, you will almost always see seam bowlers bowling at the start of an innings. Spin bowlers tend to come in later in the innings, but may bowl sooner if the conditions are particularly conducive to spin (e.g. on day 4 or 5, the pitch may be in worse condition and more likely to produce turn).

    The pitch for this match is quite green so the ball is "seaming" off the pitch (i.e. when it bounces on the seam of the ball, it is nipping sideways). There's also a bit of swing around (the ball is moving int he air) as there tends to be in English conditions, especially with cloud overhead (the science of what makes a cricket ball swing hurts my head). Jimmy Anderson is a superb swing/seam bowler when the conditions are right, and today they are/were. As a result, England didn't need to use their spin bowler and bowled Australia out having only used three bowlers in total. Australia have only bowled a few overs so it makes sense that they've only used their quickies so far. I was about to write that if you keep watching, you'll likely see Nathan Lyon, Australia's off-spinner, but given the conditions and the fragility of England's batting line-up, it's not unlikely that the seam bowlers will knock England's batsmen over cheaply and the spinner won't be needed. Keep an eye out for Mitchell Johnson...
     
  10. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    I need a good English cuss word for what WatchESPN is doing right now. I haven't been able to watch since England was 3-0. :bang:

    Are there any rules in test cricket about where you can station your fielders? It seemed like England had a LOT of guys near the wickets, but I assume that's because they didn't expect anyone to be hitting their fast bowlers well, and instead just chipping or redirecting balls (now I'm making up words -- there are probably terms for this). I've never seen a row of guys on the ... is it "off-side" as opposed to "leg-side"? The side opposite where the bowler is ... in T20.
     
  11. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    Leg-side is the side of the field closest to the batsman's legs - so it switches sides depending on whether the batsman is right or left-handed. Off-side is the other side.

    Generally you'll see fields set as 7 on the off-side and 2 on the leg, or possibly 6/3. I think the only rule in test cricket is that you can't have more than two fielders behind square on the leg-side (because of this). Fields tend to be more attacking in test cricket (i.e. players in catching positions) because a) it's more about taking wickets and b) batsmen don't tend to take as many risks to score runs as in T20. That's especially true today when the ball is doing a bit and the bowlers are on top. In the second test, Australia batted for almost two whole days in their first innings and England's field was quite defensive at times as they concentrated on slowing the run rate.

    The fielders on the off-side next to the wicket-keeper are the slips and the gully. You'll often see three slips and a gully, and occasionally four slips and two gullies. These fielders are set for the ball which takes the edge of the bat. As I said before, this is a very common mode of dismissal in test cricket. In T20 you might see a single slip for the first few overs.
     
  12. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    I can't adequately describe how much fun this conversation has been. :dreamy:

    So Mitchell Johnson is bowling. He delivered a ball that was WAY wide of the wicket. Is that not a "wide ball" because it bounced in the right spot?
     
  13. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    Maybe we need a cricket thread.

    I continued to have issues with the live stream, so I caught up with the replay. So cool. Finally saw a spinner (you mentioned to look for Lyons, and he got Cook out on a ridiculous catch by the guy who has the worst job on the fielding team -- squatting like 10 feet away from the guy with the large bat taking monster swings), and it looks like England is really well-positioned in this particular test. They're three runs back with seven wickets in hand.

    I love how the umpire is responsible for holding on to the bowler's hat and sweater. :dreamy: It's just so gentlemanly.
     
  14. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    The calling of a "wide ball" is subjective. I'm not 100% sure but I think the laws of the game say something along the lines of "a ball is called wide if the batsman is not able to reach the ball and hit it while playing an orthodox cricket shot". In practice, there are different applications of this law. In limited overs games (T20 and 50-over games) anything that goes down the leg-side is a wide; they also draw additional "tramlines" on the crease that are to be used as a guideline for the umpire in calling off-side wides. In test cricket, the bowler gets a lot more lee-way and it basically has to be going past the batsman at the edges of the cut strip to be called a wide.

    P.S. It's not about where the ball bounces but rather where it is when it reaches the batsman.


    Yep, England is in a very strong position overnight. They'll plan to bat for as much of today as possible, ideally all of it: if they can get more than 150 runs ahead, they can control the rest of the game; if they can get 250+ ahead it would take something quite remarkable for Australia to win.

    edit: Johnson just got two wickets in the first over of the day with incredible short balls. Unplayable. So now England are under pressure and are going to have to really fight to extend their lead. Context: Johnson ripped through England in the last Ashes series in 2013/4 and England don't play him particularly well when he's bowling like this. England could easily be all out for 160 (or less) here now.

    That Cook dismissal was something of a freak. That fielding position is called "short leg" (side bar: the names for fielding positions are worthy of an entire post and some of them defy any kind of logic... "short leg" is kinda self-explanatory because it is "short" (i.e. close to the batsman) and on the leg-side... but there is no apparent reason behind "third man"). Short leg is primarily intended for catching the ball when it loops up gently, either from a fast bowler bowling short-pitched balls which bounce high and make the batsman fend wildly, or from spin bowlers who are able to make the ball spin, bounce and ricochet from bat-to-pad (or vice-versa) and then into the air. Cook was really unlucky - 99 times out of 100 that ball goes to the side of the fielder and goes for four. Of the times where it hits the fielder, 99 times out of 100 it hits the fielder and falls to safety.
     
    #574 gazareth, Jul 30, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2015
  15. phillydude

    phillydude Don't Never Give Up.

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    Imagine how fun it's been for those who HAVE NO IDEA WHAT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT!
     
  16. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    It's really simple...

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Jaer

    Jaer Well-Known Member

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    My eyes glazed over somewhere in that first post. :boredtodeath:

    Jaer
    doesn't understand the intricacies of most American sports. He's just not sporty.
     
  18. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    Once you start grasping how it's played and scored and following along, it's just so :dreamy:.

    So I missed England's session this morning; when I tuned in, Australia was something like 17-1. England got that 150+ run lead you suggested they might, though, despite Johnson's pair of early wickets. I caught up with some live-blog style site that gives you every ball, then adds a bit of commentary afterward, which is downright amusing. Still, Warner is just crushing them right now -- strike rates of 140+ don't seem to be very common in Test cricket, from what I've seen.

    Is 3:45 p.m. tea time across England? :spaz:

    (Hang on ... let's get the others involved for a moment.)

    Hey Gaz -- did you work out today? :dance:
     
  19. gazareth

    gazareth Senior Member

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    Yeah, England did OK to get the lead up after that start. Australia bowled pretty badly but a few English batsmen gave their wicket away a bit too easily (Lyth, Bell, Root, Buttler). Warner is giving it some tap but that's pretty much the way he plays - he's not capable of shutting up shop and playing defensively. We need to get him out quickly - England's batting is a bit fragile and I'm not sure I could stand to watch if we have to get 100+ to win the match. Another couple of hours of Warner batting like this will see Australia taking the game away from England I'd say.

    The afternoon interval is just called "tea", probably for some archaic and charming English reason. I guess the players just have sports drinks and snacks these days!

    I haven't lifted weights for 3 months :o I had a 1:1 cricket batting coaching session at lunchtime and I have a T20 game this evening :nod: I'm desperate for some runs - a month ago I scored a match-winning 48 not out but since then I've had scores of 0, 2, dnb, 0 and 2 - both of the 0s were first ball ("golden duck") too. :o
     
  20. volleyball

    volleyball Pickled

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    The absolute best part of that entire paragraph is how everyone else reading this journal is going "Gaz hasn't lifted? What's the deal?" and I'm all "Dude -- two zeros? That's terrible!" :lol:

    (To be absolutely clear, I'm not even sure I'd stand in there against 60-80 MPH cricket balls, even with all that protection, so when I say "terrible," I mean for YOU. If I got a bat on a ball, I'd be thrilled.)

    Was the dnb because you're in the latter half of the order and you're playing T20?
     

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