1. Have you installed the new JSF Mobile app? Check out all the details here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. One account & one avatar for all of JSF. Unified login and profile. Forum alerts on the main site, and more. Check out the details here: Forum & main site unified account feature is live!
    Dismiss Notice

Family Nutrition

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by guava, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. guava

    guava Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    Messages:
    12,604
    Likes Received:
    19
    I've managed to improve my diet recently. I'm trying to eat more fruits and vegetables, and to choose foods with a low glycemic index more often. However, I'm a mom.

    It's hard enough to get my husband to eat what I eat, but the kids are a real problem.

    The girls both love bread, rice, pasta, and potatoes, and would probably eat only that if I let them. They get a multivitamin every day. Should I limit the amount of starchy foods that they eat, or continue to allow them to make their own choices from what's served? I'd be happy to serve a soup, stew, stir-fry or casserole each night and if they don't eat it, they go hungry, but my husband seems to think this is cruel.

    Is it unfair to make my family eat what I like to eat? :eat:
     
  2. Jingo

    Jingo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2004
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    0
    nope, that's exactly what my parents did, then over time when they know i really didn't like something, rather than just not wanting it or wanting junk, they would stop serving it.

    I had "you sit at the table till it's eaten" and i had what they had, only exception being spicey foods which they didn't force me to eat.
     
  3. Trinity

    Trinity Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2004
    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think it's better to let your kids eat somewhat freely. There's a good chance that they could develop eating disorders later in life if they grow up being forced to eat mommy's diet. I would be careful about how you present your diet to them, too. Emphasize eating for health and energy, not weight loss. They need to get the right message, you know? Keep offering the healthy meals, and at least ask them to take a "no thank you" bite if they don't like what you've presented. Try making familar dishes with new proportions: lasagna with less pasta and more meat; pizza on a thin crust loaded with veggies and lean meat; casserole with low-fat sauce, lean meat and veggies.

    Between meals, I think it's equally important to keep only healthy options around the house. It's sort of cruel to keep a gallon of cookies n' cream ice cream in the freezer and then tell your kids they have to eat cherry tomatoes instead. Just like us, the junk food isn't on their mind as much if it isn't in their face. Keep things like string cheese, Laughing Cow cheese wedges, fruit cups, baby carrots, ants on a log (celery with pb and raisins), grape tomatoes (very sweet), and beef jerky around for them instead of Gushers, Oreos, and String Thing.

    And if you can find a way of making it fun, do it! Kids are all about games. My mom used to make color-themed snacks for us before practice. Orange day would be smashed yams, oranges, and baby carrots. Think of funny names for the foods you make--it makes it more of a game. Instead of beef goulash, how about beef "ghoul" lash?

    Hope this helps!
     
  4. MYBAD?

    MYBAD? Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2004
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think its an important responsibility of yours to ensure that your children eat a good diet. Many countries are experiencing an obesity problem and we have to lay some of the blame on nutritional education through childhood. It way seem cruel but sometimes we have to be cruel to be kind. :nod:
     
  5. guava

    guava Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    Messages:
    12,604
    Likes Received:
    19
    I'm not eating for weight loss. I'm happy with my current weight.

    I wouldn't do a "sit at the table till it's finished" routine. Just a "You eat this lasagna, or you eat oranges for supper." My husband says more like "You eat this lasagna, or I'll make you some toast, or some pasta, or a ham sandwich." Nothing incredibly bad for them, but not as healthy as the meal that I prepared.

    My husband has quit buying quite so much junk food, but it's still way too much to have around. And I wish I could get him to quit buying salami.

    I didn't understand what you said Jingo. Where you pleased with what your parents did?
     
  6. rein

    rein Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think a lot of it is how it is presented to them. I have a daughter and when I first started out my eating plan I made the mistake of calling it a diet one day. I hardly ever call it a diet anyway because I'm really not trying to lose a lot of weight, it is more of a nutrional intake shift from what I was eating. She joked around for two weeks about my diet and things I could not eat. However, after a few weeks of me not making a big deal and preparing good foods for dinner she has yet to complain. Honestly, I don't think she has noticed now that I have not referred to it as a diet again. However, if you are substituting things like Tofu into the mix they are going to notice the taste. I have not done anything like that, just gone to no-fat products, olive oils, and limited things like Mayonaise and processed foods. If you are the one that cooks dinner, you could always just not cook rice and pasta but once a week. I wouldn't forbid them to eat things like that, just make it less available and prepare it enough to where they don't notice so much. I still eat rice, pasta and patatoes myself, just not nearly as much as a used to. I also eat more sweet patatoes now, do they like those? They are lower on the GI scale and much tastier, even with out the butter I used to drench them in.
     
  7. NME

    NME Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    0
    Absolutely correct. Many children would rather sit at the table all night than eat a few green beans. Forcing a child to eat a specific diet is foolish. Aside from the overwhelming possibility of the child developing an eating disorder, it can breed contempt towards the parents that can cause psychological issues. Kids will grow up fast enough and they will have to choose (when the time is right, and only they will know) how they wish to eat. Until then, let them live a little and try your best to encourage a healthy diet but if it doesn't take, don't force the issue.
     
  8. HunkOLove

    HunkOLove Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Messages:
    375
    Likes Received:
    0
    Kids:

    I read a study in college [I don't have a link sorry] that found young children will generally choose foods that meet their nutrition requirements on their own as long as those foods are available.

    Though the choices seem strange sometimes if you plug it into the old food calc it comes out pretty good. I have two young boys myself. Trick is don't come home from the grocery loaded with treats. If they aren't there they won't eat them. We keep a few around but limit it. Mostly they have fruit and yogurt for snacks. Some Oreos are around in case of emergency and to torment me on my diet.

    One thing I noticed is that the kids drink water constantly throughout the day. I mean tons. Nothing I told them to do they just naturally do it.
     
  9. Fudgam

    Fudgam Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2004
    Messages:
    506
    Likes Received:
    0
    Being that Im still living at home(obviously :p), I can tell you this: If you dont want them to eat it, dont buy it. There is never junk food in this house, so I never eat any. If they love crap food, you need to get them addicted to good food.
    The best spread in the world.....Nutella. Holy crap this stuff is good. I put it on fruit and it tastes great.
     
  10. bolo

    bolo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    very true
     
  11. teencraft

    teencraft Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tough love, be like "eat this or starve!!!!!!!!"

    Thats what my mom did, I ate some of the nassssttiest stuff ever, like liver. It's good for ya, it won't kill them, and it's not like you're hurting them.
     
  12. Christina

    Christina Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is there a compromise?

    I'm a mom, too, so I know where you're coming from. I have the same rule at my table: Eat what is served or you get nothing. Sometimes they choose nothing. I don't worry about it because I know that if they're hungry enough they'll eat it. They won't let themselves starve to death.

    That said, it is hard to have them totally change what they're used to. Maybe you can serve bread or toast with your meals. You just don't have to eat it yourself. Just make one piece for each of them. That is their limit. You can make a little brown rice for you and some white rice for the rest of them with your stir fries. That's not too much more effort. Make lots of veggies, so if they are still hungry, that's what's left, so they can have that. Look for recipes that satisfy your nutrition requirements but appeal to them as well. I'm trying to post some of my favorites in the recipe section. GI is a new concept for me, so I haven't considered that in the past. I am interested in keeping an eye on it now, though. So please post some of your favorites. I'll be looking out for them.

    I think it is extremely important for you and your husband to have a united front with your children. Discuss it with him, and come up with a compromise that you both agree too. Maybe if he will agree not to fix other food for the kids, you can try to include some limited kid-friendly options.

    The best advice, however, has already been said: Only buy what you want your kids to eat. They can't eat junk if it's not in the house. My kids eat yogurt, fruit, and carrots and celery for snacks... and they love them! Of course, if we had a lot of junk, they would choose that first. They can't have it when it's not there.
     
  13. MYBAD?

    MYBAD? Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2004
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    This has developed into an interesting thread.

    I can't understand why some of you would think that a kid will develop an eating disorder when you tell them to not leave the table till they've eaten what they're given? My parents made me do it and I can honestly say that it did not affect me in later life. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I would imagine that there are most probably more important reasons that one would develop an eating disorder?

    I remember going through lots of phases when I was a child where I would severely test how far I could push my parents to get what I wanted. The fact remained that I was only ever able to eat what they bought but had it been left up to me, I would have undoubtedly eaten sweets and chocolate all day. As Christina says, they wont let themselves starve to death but perhaps there is some middle ground which can be explored in terms of the choice of what is served.

    I think that there are risks with having a too "liberal" attitude with kids these days.
     
  14. guava

    guava Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    Messages:
    12,604
    Likes Received:
    19
    Christina, Search for Kerry's Beany Salad in Allrecipes. Yum yum delicious, but I'm the only one in the family that will eat it!

    I don't much like beans, but I'm trying. I love barley, but no one else will touch the stuff. Some good barley recipes here http://vegweb.com/food/rice/index-rice-barley.shtml

    My main goal is to increase my fruits and vegetables. So I'm not really aware of the GI of most foods, I just try to keep in mind to eat less of the highest GI foods.
     
  15. guava

    guava Elite Member
    Lifetime Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    Messages:
    12,604
    Likes Received:
    19
    Christina, I'm so glad that you replied. I'm glad to see that we think alike, and I'll be using your ideas. I will definitely have to have a talk with my husband to be sure that we are both doing the same things with the kids instead of them playing us against each other. The biggest battle is the junk food. I'll ask him to lock it up, or at least hide it better, if he can't manage to stop buying it entirely.

    I've been doing well with meals lately. I always cut up fruit for them to eat before and during lunch, and I've been serving a salad plus two different vegetable options for supper. They love pudding for dessert, so I usually make the instant fat free sugar free, though even the regular kind is healthy and we sometimes have tapioca instead.

    They'd probably enjoy Nutella as well. Is that stuff healthy for you?
     
  16. ThatOldGuy

    ThatOldGuy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Messages:
    572
    Likes Received:
    0
    I can't add much to what's already been said. I don't think you're being cruel at all to encourage your kids to eat a healthy diet. The key is to "encourage" and not "demand". Anyone with kids knows that as soon as you start demanding, they'll start refusing. It's all about the psychology.

    Your first step really need to be to reach a compromise with your husband. You can encourage all you want but kids will choose the Oreo over the apple every time. Kids are bombarded with television commercials that encourage them to eat all sorts of junk food. Those ads are created by professionals who are very good at what they do. As long as your husband brings it home, the kids are going to eat it.

    They are just children so you can't expect them to eat a diet of nothing but health food. The key is to limit the amount of junk foods to a reasonable level.
     
  17. Adam_S

    Adam_S Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
  18. Fudgam

    Fudgam Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2004
    Messages:
    506
    Likes Received:
    0
    Heres the specs:
    serving size-2 tbsp
    calories-200
    fat calories-100
    total fat-11g
    sat fat-2g
    choleterol-0mg
    sodium-15mg
    total carb-23g
    fiber-2g
    sugars-20g
    protein-2g
     
  19. Christina

    Christina Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Kerry's Beany Salad looks great

     

Share This Page