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egg whites- watery? how to fix.

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by wiffleboy, Jul 20, 2004.

  1. wiffleboy

    wiffleboy Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    I have a problem,
    When i make 6 egg white fried eggs, they always come out with a puddle of water on the plate :mad: . Is there a way to fry eggs and not have the puddle? I can cook full fat eggs so they pretty much stay dry, but the whites are giving trouble. eggs whites swimming in a puddle of water is not what i would call savory.

    thanks :eat:

    wiff
     
  2. PhilipDC78

    PhilipDC78 Well-Known Member

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    Are you sure you are cooking the whites long enough so that they are completely cooked? That could be one reason that you are seeing liquid in the eggs. How are you cooking them? Are you frying them with or without oil? Poaching them?
     
  3. Fourteener

    Fourteener Well-Known Member

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    What you are looking for is volume.

    To get more volume out of your egg whites you want to beat them. You can beat an egg white into different degrees of stiffness.

    An egg white is 87% water and 10% protien. The white thickens best at room temperature. If beatan to much, the protien molecules of the white will actually lose elasticity and turn back to water. You must figure out the best point for you to cook the white through trial and error. A copper pan works best for cooking the egg white.

    You can also blend the whites for a moment in a blender. I am sure a shaker would work well also.

    Cream of Tartar can be added to make the egg white stiffer. Also, if you rub the pan (not alluminum as it makes whites discolor) with a half a lemon it will aid in the process.

    Of course, if you add one yolk to your 6 eggs, your eggs will not be watery (unless undercooked). NOTHING is wrong with egg yolks in general, so one is certainly fine.

    The bottom line:

    If your egg whites end up as a puddle of watery goo on your plate, they are under-cooked for at least your liking. Try cooking in a small tupperware in the microwave. In the end you end up with an egg white patty that you can use as you like.

    :gl:

    four
     
  4. wiffleboy

    wiffleboy Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the tips. I like my eggs medium, can't stand burn but don't want them sloppy. They look thoughly cooked when i take them off, I use a stainless steel teflon pan with cooking spray. I seperate the egg whites and turn heat to medium. Add egg whites without beating them. so they still should have there eslasticity. I guess i could try to add something to them to bind them.

    I cook them over a lower heat because i was told that if you cook them to fast the the water will seperate from the eggs, but it hasn't been working, still getting puddles.


    Are there any more ideas.? :confused:
     
  5. WickedFaerie

    WickedFaerie Well-Known Member

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    So you are putting them in the pan without beating them? All you need is a fork or whisk and give them a few beats in a bowl before putting them in the pan. Also, add salt, this helps get the water out a bit (you can also use salt to get the water out of veggies too). I suggest a high medium heat for the eggs. It is faster, and it cooks them better IMO. I make egg whites every day and have no problems with water using these methods.

    You could always try egg substitute if none of the above works for you. Experiment a bit and I am sure you will find a way.
     
  6. sc7389

    sc7389 Well-Known Member

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    What I usually do is fry eggs on one side for a few min first and then flip them over to the other side and let them fry for a few more minutes.
     
  7. wiffleboy

    wiffleboy Well-Known Member

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    ok, new morning, a new day to try new cooking methods.

    First of all, I buy farm eggs, free range, from a farm up the road from me, I get them a few days after they are laid.

    The Grading system A,AA,B refers to age of the egg. You are correct that AA are the rounded and thickest. But if you buy Grade A eggs and leave them in your fridge for a while they will be idenitical to fresh Grade B that you just bought. As eggs age they lose their thickness and roundness. The reason the free range seem better is that they are usually fresher than the run of the mill .89/dozen kind that are sitting a your local grocery store.

    Ok,

    this morning i took the eggs and whipped them with a egg beater for 15 seconds, I didn't add salt or pepper, and i used a medium high heat. The result was eggs that had a tiny amount of water seperation. :claplow: This is a great improvement. I think that adding salt before cooking was drawing the water out of them.

    I didn't have to drain my eggs!. I will see if this continues tomorrow.

    thanks for the suggestions.

    wiff
     
  8. WickedFaerie

    WickedFaerie Well-Known Member

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    I thought everyone flipped them! Your post made me realize that maybe some people don't. :confused:

    Yes, flip, water will be gone.
     

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