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Dorm Food

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by Scott, Jan 23, 2004.

  1. Scott

    Scott Well-Known Member

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    I'm a college student and I know there are at least a couple more on this forum and being in college has its ups and downs. One, its really easy to get a great workout and I have access to an excellent gym. I've established for myself a really good cardio/muscular development routine. I'm 300 and would like to get around 220 so I'm mainly focusing on weight loss.

    But the other aspect of weight loss, nutrition, is almost impossible for me to accurately measure. My options are pretty limited when it comes to high-protein/low-carb/low-fat things. If I want the meats that have the proteins, I often have to settle for a high fat meal. Additionally, its often difficult to measure and find out the nutrients of what I'm eating. Luckily, there is a grocery store near by where I can purchase carrots and other mid-meal snacks, but heavy cooking just isn't possible


    Does anyone have suggestions as to options for ways to get the high-protein meal and also ways to accurately measure the nutrients of what I'm eating?

    Thanks, this forum and john have been a great inspiration and motivator.

    -Scott
     
  2. NME

    NME Well-Known Member

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    check out sites like http://www.calorieking.com and http://www.fitday.com (I recommend the former, myself) if you need to find the nutritional information for foods.

    As for high-protein meals, I understand you're in college (I'm in the same boat) and that money is, in all liklihood, tight. However, I would suggest spending the $30 (give or take) and get yourself a tub of whey protein. This is a great source of protein at a relatively low cost. While it's not ideal to get the majority of your protein from a supplement, this is better than shortchanging your protein intake or consuming too much saturated fat as found in beef.
     
  3. Super Fink

    Super Fink Well-Known Member

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    Scott -

    do you eat in the cafe or do you live in a suite with a kitchen? If you eat in the cafe try to eat cold cuts, turkey, lean roastbeef (you can tell by looking at it), etc. Make a salad at the salad bar, drink water or diet sodas. I don't know what yuour cafe offers, but you can easily find healthy stuff to eat, its just a matter of staying away from the non healthy stuff thats right in front of you.

    As for counting - sometimes you can only estimate...so do your best on estimating and don't under estimate, always over estimate! There are a ton of online calorie "books" that list what every food contains and portion sizes.

    Good Luck!
     
  4. Adam_S

    Adam_S Well-Known Member

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    also in college

    I'm also in college, here's what I'd recommend.

    Don't concentrate on calories at this point, concentrate on eating about 1/2 to 2/3 of what you would normally eat. Virtually everyone in this country overeats waaaaaay too much, fast food has really facilitated this. If you get a hamburger, for instance, cut/tear it in half, save the rest for later and just eat half.

    Change your diet, which it sounds like you're doing. The fewer processed foods, the better. I sympathize because processed foods are easy and don't take up any time, but I started losing only when I kicked out most of the processed foods and started forming my own meals. Also eat four-six meals a day, if the meals are much smaller as I mentioned above, this shouldn't be quite as tough, splitting up a meal is a good way to not overeat at one meal but not have to prepare multiple meals.

    Stop drinking soda. This is especially important if you're going to be exercising regular. phosphoric and carbonic acids in colas and sodas leach essential vitamins and minerals out of your body. Putting greater stress on your body while you have vitamins and minerals constantly leaving your body is like making only withdrawls from your bank acount, you're going to bounce unless you make some deposits or stop some withdrawals. Even Diet soda is still awful. Sodas (especially cola) also have high fructuse corn syrup. HFCS begins to turn into glucose as soon as it hits your saliva, by the time it gets to your small intestine (where most absorbtion takes place) it's pretty much all completely converted into glucose. glucose is one of the simplest sugars that your body can use immediately. Most of the time it gets stored for later--fat. Bottom line, sodas are awful for your body, water and juice, water and juice.

    supplement. You're not going to get all the vitamins, minerals, EFAs, amino acids etc from your four basic food groups, no matter how good your vitamins are. Worldwide farming practices for the past 150 years have depleted our soils of most of the essential minerals we need, and since we've stopped 'disasters' like flooding, they're not recharged except for the three minerals in NPK (nitrogen, phosphoros, potassium) fertilizer. You have to supplement, foods aren't nutritious enough. Even more important is that you're going to be sweating when you exercise. sweat is not just salt water, it's full of minerals and electrolytes as well. Those have to be replaced, so if you're exercising supplementing is even more important. I recommend plant-derived liquid minerals. metallic minerals are not very absorbable, although in chelated (wrapped in an amino acid) form they're more absorbable.

    you can calorie count, but I personally find that to be a little too frustrating and time consuming, so I eat less, I eat smart, and I supplement. That's the best advice I can offer.

    Adam
     
  5. Scott

    Scott Well-Known Member

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    Alot of what you've suggested I've also thought on my own, but it's great to hear that what I'm doing is on the right track.

    I eat in the cafeteria because unfortunately I don't have a kitchenette or anything like that,

    Generally my breakfast is a hardboiled egg with cereal and some fruit. Lunch and dinner always has a salad and water water water. Usually there is a healthy vegetable, steamed carrots, cauliflower (my fave) etc.. Then it's a matter of hunt and pick for a decent healthy food. There is usually a high-cholesterol meat and various kinds of pastas, some loaded with cheese, but others plain. The lunch meat suggestion is a great idea which I'll have to try, I think a sandwhich would be perfect for lunch along with a salad and some fruit.

    One thing I've wondered is the healthiness of scrambled eggs, are they alot worse then hardboiled eggs? Are omlettes alright? I think eggs give me alot of protein that I need, but I know they're also high in other 'bad' areas, like cholesterol. advice?


    What are peoples opinions on pastas? Are the high-carbo's alright for weight loss?

    Another question I've had is the amount of calories I'm supposed to be eating. Right now I range about 2000, which I feel is fine. For someone who is focusing primarily on weight loss and not muscle development as much, should it be higher, lower?

    Finally, I've been reading about the 40/40/20 percentage diet with high protein, but there are always cautions that it is used for people on an 'intense' workout regimen or something along those lines. How serious does the weight program need to be?

    thanks for all your great tips, I hope I'm asking questions some other people have as well.

    -Scott
     
    #5 Scott, Jan 24, 2004
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2004

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