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Designing a Maintenance Diet?

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by Santanj, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. Santanj

    Santanj Active Member

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    Howdy,

    So I see there's a subforum for cutting and one for bulking, but not one for maintenance, so I suppose I'll post here. I am in the middle of a cut that's going well (haven't skipped a workout, missed or cheated on a meal in the first 32 days - woohoo!). I'm still two months off when I expect to finish, but am concerned about transitioning for the summer. For most of my formative years, I played football and wrestled - so depending on the season, I was constantly either actively gaining or actively losing weight. I don't think I ever was able to naturally maintain weight (I'd whipsaw too far in one direction or the other).

    So, assuming I have relatively accurate data at the end of my cut of my lean & fat mass, my measurements, scale weight, and precisely what I've eaten for the 100 days prior - could someone please advise a general approach to transition into summer maintenance? For what it's worth, my objective for the summer is to remain lean enough to run distance (5 and 10ks throughout the summer, perhaps culminating in the Chicago Marathon in the fall).

    Thanks!
     
  2. Robert2006

    Robert2006 Active Member

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    Depending on how extreme your current calorie shortfall is I'd just start slowly hiking the calories. Say one or two hundred. Wait a few weeks. Maybe a bit longer. See how you're doing. Adjust.

    Watch for things that can cause scale weight to fluctuate. Sodium or increased carbs will cause you to retain more water. So don't let that confuse you.

    The other thing is to not get too hung up on the scale. Your weight will vary. You don't want huge swings but a few pounds one way or the other isn't a big deal.
     
  3. Santanj

    Santanj Active Member

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    Should I be adjusting macros as well? At the moment, I have a 40/40/20 macro ratio. Should I tweak that as I bump calories as well? Or will keeping the same macro split while incrementing calories be a smarter approach?

    My intuition is to bump carbs a bit, particularly if I'm going to be running for distance. But at the expense of fat or protein?

    Thanks for the feedback!
     
  4. Robert2006

    Robert2006 Active Member

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    If you're shooting for a certain number of grams of protein then percentage will drop when your over all calories go up. If you're only getting 20% fat I wouldn't cut it. 20% is already near the low end.
     
  5. Santanj

    Santanj Active Member

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    Yeah, that's a good call. That's how I had originally planned this diet (*scrolls up to the top of his long Excel sheet*), and since I'm looking to maintain muscle mass, I probably don't need to increase protein much, if at all. This is a relief since high quantities of protein seem to be expensive, dietarily boring, or both (only the former is really an issue - I'm eating so much darn no fat Greek Yogurt that Dannon should be sending me handwritten thank you letters). So making the bumps in fat and carbs should allow me the extra energy to start training for distance races in 60 days!

    Thanks for the feedback again!
     
  6. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

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    What are your stats and your caloric intake? Establishing macro ratio's would be secondary to initially establishing your protein/carb/fat ratios's. For example, if someone needed 230 grams of protein, 150 grams of carbs, and 80 grams of fat, then their ratio's by default, would come out to 47/27/32 (pro,carb,fat).
     

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