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Deadlifts, Grip Strength, and Lifting Straps

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by LeftNut, Feb 12, 2008.

  1. LeftNut

    LeftNut Well-Known Member

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    Well I am a bit frustrated with deadlifts lately. I just can't seem to hold on to the weight, and my grip slips. I am using the alternate-grip typical for deadlifts. I am using gloves. I can handle the weight just fine, but my hands give out before I can get any real work done. :mad:

    This is especially a problem when the weather is warmer and sweaty palms slip off the bar easily. The gloves don't seem to help enough. Maybe a different type of glove?

    I have tried straps, but they just seem to hurt my wrists. I am fairly certain I am using the straps correctly. Anyone else notice this?

    As far as my grip strength goes, I do weighted pullups without straps, and my back will fail before my grip does. So I don't think I have too much of a problem there. Still, I have considered doing more forearm and grip work to increase strength there. But at some point I think I will still need something to help me hold on to the bar.

    Has anyone else had this problem? Does anyone have any suggestions?

    Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I've had that problem in the past. Using a mixed grip helps alot -- but, one thing that helped immensely was incorporating static bar holds into my routine. You just load up the bar with a bunch of weight, and hold it for as long as you can. This is really quite effective at building up grip strength (it happens quickly too)....and, after awhile, will make it so that you can't find a weight too heavy for you to grip (mixed). I never have that problem anymore.....
     
  3. Ectomorphic

    Ectomorphic Active Member

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    I haven't run into grip problems yet, but I've thought about doing grip stuff anyways, with static holds being the easiest and most convenient method at the moment. How much weight do you use though, in relation to your current working sets or 1RM? And do you do sets, or something? How often?
     
  4. George

    George Senior Member

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    Like Joe said, you can build up your grip pretty well with static holds for time. These are fun with heavy dumbbells, too.

    From an equipment standpoint, you've also got a bunch of options; chalk, lifting hooks, and maybe some thicker straps (I recently switched to these from a cheap pair of BB.com straps and they feel a lot more comfortable).
     
  5. JoeSchmo

    JoeSchmo Well-Known Member

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    I haven't done them in awhile, because my grip strength has held up pretty well....but, if my grip starts to have problems again, I will start up again. I would usually do them about once per week, usually on a day that didn't require lots of heavy gripping. I would normally do about 3-5 sets, and the weight would vary week to week. Sometimes I'd do a weight that I could only hold for about 5-10 seconds, and other times, I'd do a weight that I could hold for maybe a minute.

    I didn't do my max weight that often, mostly because my holds were double overhand, and my dead grip is mixed. But I found it transferred very well. Occasionally though, I'd load up more than my max, and hold with a mixed grip as long as I could (which kinda hurts the hands).

    The thing that really surprised me, was how quickly my grip strength increased from doing this. Within just a couple of weeks, weight that I really struggled to hold, felt like a breeze.
     
  6. MannishBoy

    MannishBoy Senior Member

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    I struggle with grip issues too.

    But one thing I have found is that gloves make it harder to hold the bar. My grip went up when I embraced my calluses.
     
  7. anfeyd

    anfeyd Active Member

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    Once I started using chalk and the hook grip I haven't had any problems holding onto the bar.
     
  8. NCNBilly

    NCNBilly Well-Known Member

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    Ditto on ditching the gloves. Do your deadlift warmups with a double overhand grip until you hit a weight that you can't, then switch to the alternate grip. When that fails, then straps. Just doing that process alone on deadlift days will help your grip.

    4 weeks ago I couldn't pull 225 without straps, now I can easily pull 300 barehanded. Callouses aren't too much of an issue if you grip the bar correctly.
     
  9. LeftNut

    LeftNut Well-Known Member

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    Thanks

    Cool, thanks for the replies. I will definitely be working on some static holds. I have gone sans-gloves before, but have had problems with sweaty palms making the bar slip...maybe some chalk is the ticket.

    :tucool:
     
  10. docutech

    docutech Active Member

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    I tried the static holds today and wow! Those are a lot harder than they sound. Since I use hooks for my deadlifts (weak grip), I decided to take the above advice and work on my grip strenght. I loaded up the bar with 6 plates and tried the overhand grip :doh:Not a chance! I had to take a 2 off in order to get the weight off the safety bars. Once I got the bar in hand it was about a minute before I started shaking like crazy, not long after that my grip failed. I did this a second time until failure and it felt pretty good. I will be doing these on a regular basis! :tu:
     
  11. woodan

    woodan Well-Known Member

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    So how do you go about these?
     
  12. docutech

    docutech Active Member

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    I perform these in the squat rack. I set the height of the safety stops to about groin level, place the barbell on them and load up the weight.
    The actual lift height is only a few inches from the safety bars for obvious reasons. Thats it!
     
  13. woodan

    woodan Well-Known Member

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    I might give these a try then. Ta
     
  14. digitalnebula

    digitalnebula Plagiarist

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    Strategic use of hooks can allow you to progress in your deadlifting without waiting for your grip to play catch up...
    While using hooks, do other things to improve grip strength. Power cleans, shrugs, rows, pullups, static bar holds, etc....
     
  15. mattback

    mattback Active Member

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    I used to struggle to pull 315, and now i can hold onto 405... no straps, nothing, just a good old mixed grip ANDD

    a little bit of chalk,
    anddddd
    [​IMG]

    omggggg that stuff rules
     
  16. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    I like to kick it old school:

    [​IMG]

    :whistle:

    (Not really.)
     
  17. mattback

    mattback Active Member

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    ok, i don't undersatnd the whistle emoticon, ever. what kind of feeling is it supposed to invoke?

    secondly, i didnt think that tite grip stuff worked until i tried it. it does. it also helps majorly on the rings.
     
  18. Big_D

    Big_D Well-Known Member

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    :lol:
     
  19. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    IMO, it basically means "good naturedly not serious" and has a bit of a mischievous connotation. It usually denotes that whatever precedes it is a joke and meant to be humorous.

    This use probably derives from cartoons where characters will set traps but then step away, put their hands in their pockets or clasp them behind their back, and pace while whistling in order to look as if they are disinterested and non-suspicious. However, the viewer, having witnessed them set the trap, knows that this of course is not the case. So, as another character falls for the trap, the situation becomes humorous on account of the dramatic irony, causing the entire sequence of events to be classified as a joke or gag. The whistling becomes representative of this type of gag because it is retained through almost every instance of it.
     
    #19 chicanerous, Feb 19, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2008
  20. mattback

    mattback Active Member

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    ok cracking up laughing

    hahahaha i get it.

    i feel like THE idiot now.

    village idiot

    i love you guys
     

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