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Cycling vs Adding Muscle

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by eleven24, May 16, 2005.

  1. eleven24

    eleven24 Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to training I find myself between the proverbial rock and a hard place. In this case, I want to become a better cyclist which means high intensity cardio. But I also don't want to look like a typical endurance athlete, i.e. tall & lanky with no muscle.

    So, what I'm looking for here is a balance between the two without overtraining. All weight training is done using MaxOT principles. The numbers represent heavy sets.

    Monday
    - Biceps (Straight Bar Curls-2, DB Curls-2, Preach Curls-1)
    - Triceps (Pressdowns-2, Skullcrushers-2, Kickbacks-1)
    - Forearms (Wrist Curls-3)

    Tuesday
    - Cycling. 22 miles, Flat terrain, 20-22mph pace.

    Wednesday
    - Shoulders (Military Press-2, DB Press-2, Side Raise-1)
    - Legs (Squats-2, Lunges-1, Calf Raises-2)

    Thursday
    - Cycling. 13 miles, Hilly terrain, 15-17mph.

    Friday
    - Chest (Flat BP-2, Incline BP-2, Decline BP-1)
    - Back (Lat Pulls-3, Seated Rows-2)

    Saturday
    - Cycling. 40 miles, Flat terrain, 20-22mph.

    Sunday Nothing, or a leisurely bike ride with my wife & son.


    Through the winter, while predominantly weight training, my diet was based on 40-40-20 CPF. The more daylight we have, the longer I'll ride, so I suspect I'll bump the carbs up.

    I'm just looking for advice from anyone else who is trying to strike a balance between the two.
     
  2. phillydude

    phillydude Don't Never Give Up.

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    Hey there... I'm in the same boat as you are. I'm training on the bike once again (competing in duathlons), as well as training to run the Philly marathon in November... and trying to figure out how weight training fits into all this. I'm really at a loss... not only is TIME an issue, but I'm conflicted about losing weight by getting my body fat down against gaining muscle (and weight) from lifting. I know it will help in the long run as far as metabolism etc goes, but with my volume of endurance training, it's really hard to also put in the time at the gym.
     
  3. tennisball

    tennisball Well-Known Member

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    I have read some articles posted at t-nation and on berardi's site that showed some high level endurance athletes (for this example, it was a x-c skiier) whose diet was the main limiting facor in body composition. When she increased her protein intake ratio, while bumping up total caloric intake - from 2500kcal/day at 60/20/20 (carb/pro/fat) to 4000kcal/day at 30/50/20 - the athele lost bodyfat while improving performance.

    I'll dig up the reference if you're interested.



     
  4. phillydude

    phillydude Don't Never Give Up.

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    Very interesting... I was thinking about that this morning when I was reviewing my one-month stats. I'm on around 2200 calories a day at 40/40/20 right now, and while I lost a total of nine pounds in the past 30 days, eight of them were lean mass. Maybe I am not eating ENOUGH... although with the LISS types of cardio I'm doing, I doubt its eating into the muscle THAT quickly. I think it's more variance in the caliper readings than anything else.
     
  5. Nico

    Nico Well-Known Member

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    I think given the amount of LISS you're doing you need to be eating 3,000 calories and at least 200g of protein, which would be about 28% of the total. So maybe go for 40/30/30.
     
  6. StevieD

    StevieD Well-Known Member

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    I have a very similar routine to the original poster. Weight lifting MWF (HST). On Tuesday and Thursday I commute by bike to work, 25 miles in the morning at a steady pace of 18-20mph, 12 miles in the afternoon, usually with some form of interval training. On Saturday I usually go for a longer ride, on the order of 40-60 miles, sometimes longer.

    For what it's worth, last year I dropped about 25 pounds on a 40-40-20 diet of around 2000 calories per day, starting at 197lbs and estimated 18% bf, ending up at 165lb around 8% bf.

    In the past year, I have eaten approximately 2500 calories per day, more like 30-50-20. In that time, I have gained about 7 lbs, and my bodyfat has increased to around 10.5%.

    It sure doesn't seem like I should gain ANY weight at that calorie level, and especially not add any fat, but there it is. Guess I'm cursed to some degree.
     
  7. jsbrook

    jsbrook Well-Known Member

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    I can't imagine that 2200 calories is near enough to support endurance training. Particularly when weight training is added to the mix. All of that weight being lean mass is further evidence of this. I really didn't count calories as a competitive endurance athlete. I just ate. A LOT. I'm not suggesting you do this. But 2200 is clearly not cutting it.
     
  8. thirtysomething

    thirtysomething Well-Known Member

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    I gained muscle while cycling hills, especially in my quads and shoulders. It also works the triceps and abs.
     
  9. dano

    dano Well-Known Member

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    Your cycling mileage doesn't seem to extreme at all. Up your calories and you'll be just fine.
    I raced mountain bikes competitively for 3 years and maintained 180-185 lbs. at 10-11 % bf throughout with moderate weight training.
    I put in 150-200 miles a week on the road. I used a combination of sprints/endurance/race pace training.
     
  10. Nico

    Nico Well-Known Member

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    How did you determine your b/f % increase? Is there a chance some of that 7 pounds you gained was muscle? I think it's more likely that you gained some fat AND muscle and you may be mischaracterizing the weight gain.

    Also, Phillydude is trying to run quite a few miles a week so I think that ups his caloric requirement by at least 300/day.
     
  11. StevieD

    StevieD Well-Known Member

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    I determine my bodyfat by combining caliper measurements with the results that mybodycomp.com gives me. Even then, I know that it's only a rough estimate. But, I've used the same method consistently, so at least it should show me trends.

    If you just do the calculations, I think of the 7 lbs I gained, 5 was fat and 2 was muscle.
     
  12. Nico

    Nico Well-Known Member

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    If that's the case than maybe you are unlucky in that your BMR is lower than the norm. Assuming your 12 mile ride is of at least a moderate intensity, you're doing a lot of cardio every week to gain fat on 2,500 cals. It's surprising to me considering the low amount of carbs.
     
  13. StevieD

    StevieD Well-Known Member

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    Do you consider 50% of caloric intake from carbs to be low?

    The other thing is this: I lost about 30 lbs at a pace of about 1 lb per week. That would seem to indicate that I was at a deficit of about 500 calories / day, right? If I subsequently increase my intake by 500 calories per day, you'd think I would stabilize. Is it possible I LOWERED my metabolism that much on such a reasonably paced weight loss, when I ended up with a fairly low bf% and still perform a lot of exercise?
     
  14. Nico

    Nico Well-Known Member

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    Usually people list carbs-protein-fat so when you said 30-50-20 I thought you meant 50% protein (which is very hard to do without drinking just shakes and eating meat/eggs all day).

    I think it's highly possible that your metabolism was lowered by the reduced caloric intake. The thing about exercise is that your metabolism can adjust to LISS but HIIT tends to ramp it up (from studies I've read). Just by my observation, I used to go to a lot of 10K and half marathon races because my sister is a runner and I ran some myself. I noticed a surprising percentage of people who could run marathons but still had a pretty large amount of fat.

    So I guess what I'm saying is-mix in more high intensity interval training and you may find that your metabolism kicks up. You may also want to experiment with cycling your caloric intake.
     

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