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creatine + diet coke

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Supplements' started by flair.14, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. flair.14

    flair.14 Active Member

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    Is it true that creatine is more effective if it is mixed with juice? Is it because of the sugar in juice? Would it be equally effective in Diet Coke?
     
  2. Drox

    Drox Active Member

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    From what I read it is more effective when taken with a non-acidic juice such as grape juice.

    I don't think it would be only because Diet Coke does not have any sugar in it. It uses artificial sweeteners. Then again, I dont know how that compares with regular sugar when it comes to the creatine issue, it is just a guess.
     
  3. Bluestreak

    Bluestreak Well-Known Member

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    Never ingest creatine with any form of caffeine - from what I understand, this is much more important with creatine monohydrate than with the CEE form, though I simply avoid caffeine regardless. Soda? Soda of any kind is a horrible choice, period - and if it's caffeinated, it's worse for use with creatine. The idea behind taking creatine with a sugar source (like grape juice) is to cause a rise in insulin to theoretically act as a transport to deliver it to muscle tissue, which post-workout, will be somewhat depleted.

    Grape juice is very acidic, between a pH of 2.5 to 3.5. I've never heard of acidity affecting creatine, and I've heard of many an exercise enthusiast using grape juice or other sugary fruit juices with creatine. I do not, personally. I use CEE with dextrose & whey isolate post-workout.

    Correct. Diet soda has no sugar, therefore, little to no insulin will be produced after its ingestion.

    -R
     
  4. 1FastGTX

    1FastGTX Elite Member
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    I think the argument may have been "non-citrus," not "non-acidic," though I don't recall reading any solid conclusion about citrus either. This is an old debate. Just mix it in water if you're worried about it. :)

    That's white grape juice, and it's from a long, long time ago as well. I haven't heard someone mention it in a few years. :) MM2K articles used to tell you to do that, then they came out with Phosphagen's "transport system." I don't know why white grape juice, I always assumed it was because some guy just liked the taste. :)
     
  5. Drox

    Drox Active Member

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    Thanks for correcting me. As you can see from my join date, I am a noob when it comes to this stuff. I found a pretty good write up here on the grape just thing that I was talking about.
     
  6. Drox

    Drox Active Member

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    Just wondering how CEE is different from regular creatine? Also I have been reading to take it pre-workout, why do you take it post-workout or do you do both?
     
  7. Bluestreak

    Bluestreak Well-Known Member

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    Creatine Ethyl Ester (or CEE) is touted to be more soluble than creatine monohydrate or other forms of creatine previously available. Since solubility is increased, transport over biological membranes (such as uptake into your muscle's cells), CEE is more likely to be taken up by your muscles more effectively. It also requires a smaller dosage (I buy CEE in bulk powder and one 1000-gm container has lasted me nearly a year). And it eliminates the water-bloat problem, which I experienced in ernest while taking mono-creatine. It's also supposed to work better for trainees over the age of 30, but that's just the opinion of a 45-year old friend and extremely well-educated bodybuilder I know of who sports a killer physique.

    I've taken it pre-workout, I've sipped it during a workout, and I've taken it after. I saw little to no performance enhancement by taking it prior to a workout, and I felt no change in my workout when taken during the workout. It does, however, make me feel better after the workout, which is why I include it PWO. I feel as though it replenishes what I used up during my workout if taken after the fact, and I feel less lethargic after a hard workout when I take it in that fashion.

    Please keep in mind this opinion is based almost solely on my body and empirical data collected over the last four years of working out and tracking my information. Quite simply, as I always say, I encourage you to experiment on your own, and meticulously track your diet/exercise when on supplements so you can look back and see if it truly enhanced any portion of your workout program.

    -R
     
  8. Drox

    Drox Active Member

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    Thank you for the great information. :tucool: I will have to check into that CEE. I just bought the creatine and whey protein the other day so I will have to see what works out the best for me.
     
  9. mastover

    mastover Well-Known Member

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    Blue's statement regarding personal experiences should be the deciding factor. There are many different forms of creatine now, and not everyone will respond. For CEE, the ethyl group makes it better soluble in fat. I used it about a year ago with a fellow natural competitor who is well known in the natural pro ranks, and we both suffered horribly with bloating and cramps. It's entirely possible that we may have had an allergy to this particular compound.

    For those who are termed "non-responders" to creatine mono, usually it's a case where water spills outside the cell (muscle) into the gut epithelium mucosal lining which can potentially lead to all sorts of side effects......cramping, diarreah, bloating, loss of appetite, headaches, and "puffy skin".

    Creatine gluconate seems to be the buzz right now, and I'll be trying it out shortly (doesn't need a transport agent, i.e., carbs) but a fine mesh micronized creatine is what I prefer, taken during training.
     

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