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Could you check my form for SS exercises?

Discussion in 'Weight Training/Bulking' started by Gance, Jan 28, 2009.

  1. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    I think I almost got it! :spaz: I got a little carried away on my third rep and that last one -- got to keep the weight off the toes... :confused:
     
    #21 chicanerous, Jan 30, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2009
  2. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    Squat

    Your squat looks pretty good to me. Do everything the same but push those knees outward slightly as you descend and you should be good to go. You may have to bring your stance in just slightly or turn your feet out just a bit more, but don't play around with either of these until you've tried it with the stance you have. Any correction to positioning will be absolutely marginal though.

    Try a thumbless grip too and think of your hands like hooks. It will lock the bar into your back real nice in the hole and keep you from overgripping when the squat gets tough.

    Press

    Engage your glutes, comrade. Also, isometrically contract those abs, so the abdomen stays tight. Other than that, your press looks pretty good. Remember to move underneath the bar as soon as you can.

    Power Clean

    You got the basic motion down for your power clean. You just need to refine it. I wouldn't worry about pulling from the low position unless you want to stack something to elevate the bar to a standard height.

    Otherwise, work from just above the knee or just below it. If you work from just below the knee, lower slowly and stop right before you reach the knee. Then, push the glutes back just slightly to lower the bar the small distance to below. This will put you in position to get a double knee bend (a mostly voluntary reflexing of the knee) when you restart your upward pull. If you try this, take video again and post it.

    Of course, elevating the bar on something is fine too. It's probably what Rippetoe would recommend.

    Bench

    Get up further on the bench if you can (without the head going off the pad). You want to minimize the horizontal distance you move the barbell to get it into position.

    Deadlift

    Looks good at that weight, but that doesn't mean much since everybody should be able to do well at their warm-up weights. :)
     
    #22 chicanerous, Jan 30, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2009
  3. J_W

    J_W Well-Known Member

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    :lol:
     
  4. Cocomartinez

    Cocomartinez Active Member

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    But where are you putting your put - that´s the question.:confused:
     
  5. Gance

    Gance Active Member

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    We have a new JS Forum tradition :lol:
     
  6. Gance

    Gance Active Member

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    I did post the videos on the Strength mill and asked for Mark Rippetoe to check it out if he had time, but a few days have passed and I guess he didn't select my question to review. Oh well...

    Anyway, I just finished my most recent work out and made the adjustments you guys have mentioned so far. This work out was the most difficult yet, and despite the lack of sleep I hit a new high as I continue to progress. The legs out helped, but didn't quite feel "right" yet. I think I just need to keep them more stable than I am. They are starting to get shaky around the knees and that ain't good.

    The press is still hard... rough on my shoulders when I try to hold it before pushing back up. I can't seem to rack it (on myself that is) As for the power clean. Still progressing... but with the weight slowly going up, "not dropping it on the ground" is starting to really tug at my wrists when the weight drops. Damn 24 hour fitness and no bumper plates or pads on the ground... not sure what to do.
     
  7. Paper Towels

    Paper Towels Active Member

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    This advice contradicts Rippetoe himself:

    "Lock your elbows all the way out. Now, shrug up from here, like you're not through pushing." The combination of locking the elbows and shrugging the traps at the lockout with the bar directly over the ears produces a very firm, stable position at the top.

    pp. 147 Starting Strenght
     
  8. PlainGreyT

    PlainGreyT Active Member

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    rtestes is a strong proponent of HIT style exercises and his advice is in keeping with this as not locking out the arms will keep the muscles used under tension versus locking them out at the top of the movement

    I'm not trying to dispute the merits of locking versus non locking but just be mindful that different training philosophies produce different methods. There is no one 'right way' to do an exercise.
     
  9. Paper Towels

    Paper Towels Active Member

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    Right. However, since the OP is following Rippetoe, it seems to make sense to FOLLOW Rippetoe's way of doing things? In this case, that involves locking out of the elbows at the top of this movement.
     
  10. Gance

    Gance Active Member

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    Yes, Rippetoe says to lock out, even in the video, but Rtestes reasoning I can completely understand, and I just as well could change to do this without locking out probably. For most movements in life locking out is a bad thing and can risk injury.

    Honestly, that isn't the problem with the press, the PROBLEM is when the bar is down near my shoulders. I can't see to figure out how to hold it between reps without putting strain on my shoulders and wearing myself down.
     
  11. RTE

    RTE Well-Known Member

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    I learn not to lock out as good form before Jones released any of the first papers on HIT or before rippetoe was out of elementary school. It is based on the locking out of a joint can lead to injury. The extension is there just no lock out. There is no pause at the top or bottom. Look at Milos Srcev's teaching the presses. I always talk bodybuilding not power lifting.

    In my recommendation, I made the mistake of missing SS in his title and should have ignored his question entirely. I have never read the book and probally won't. I think people should follow the method they choose.
     
  12. Gance

    Gance Active Member

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    Honestly, I might be doing SS, but I'm glad you brought this up. I know from minor time with a Judo and Aikido that locking out a joint at any time is just asking for injury from the slightest movement. I haven't tried it yet, but I'll see how well the next press session goes with not locking out.
     
  13. TheThirdMohican

    TheThirdMohican Active Member

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    Ok, I'm officially confused.

    I've heard and read that locking out is bad for the joints.

    But I have also heard that not "closing" movements (e.g. squat) can lead to all sorts of muscle imbalances (in the case of squats, vastus medialis weakness)

    What's the deal?
     
  14. chicanerous

    chicanerous Elite Member
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    Locking out is not synonymous with closing a movement, though the two terms are often used interchangeably. You can close a movement without locking out. Remember that strength translates to a few degrees before and past the angle at which you stop a joint. If you close a movement without locking out, you will always be within this interval.

    Keep in mind that, when you're being told not to lock out for fear of injury, locking out refers to actively pushing against the maximum ROM of a joint. Try this right now with your elbow out in front of you. Contract your triceps and envision pushing your wrist outward against the elbow. Don't hurt yourself. This should feel quite differently than when you support the weight at the top of a bench press, for example. All the stress is on the joint. This is what leads to injury, not merely supporting a weight with a joint closed while the muscles still bear much of the load. It's also not what is colloquially meant by the term. For example, if I were to tell you to lockout when you're doing a deadlift or bench press, I really just mean to close the movement fully. Alternatively, if I recommended lockouts to help you with one of your presses, I'm just saying use the very top ROM.

    Basically, keep it so you don't feel the stress of the movement in the joint itself and you'll be doing well.
     
    #34 chicanerous, Feb 2, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2009
  15. TheThirdMohican

    TheThirdMohican Active Member

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    As I fully expected, a very good explanation. Thanks! :tu:
     
  16. Gance

    Gance Active Member

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    Interesting thoughts on locking out. I'll have to give this a shot tomorrow and see how well I can do. It sounds very sensible.
     
  17. CA$ON

    CA$ON Well-Known Member

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    I wanted to chime in and say that videos seem to help BIG time on what you are really doing in your exercises. Some sets I thought my form was dead on until I did a video.:o

    That reminds me I need a new HD video camera. :lol:


    Congrats on taking the videos, it will be well worth it! :tucool:
     

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