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calorie in vs calories out-wrong?

Discussion in 'Fat Loss/Cutting' started by clifrockh, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. clifrockh

    clifrockh Well-Known Member

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    I understand that for my weight, my basal metabolic rate is 1930. I understand that I need a 300-500 cal deficit to lose consistently. So if I stay around 2200 (my buddies goal ) calories in, and exercise about 500 cal off, I should have a deficit of 230 cal according to my weight loss partner. I feel this is incorrect because BMR is only resting expenditure and that my lifestyle caloric expenditure of 1200 on Fitday should be added to the 1930 for a true maintenance intake amount of 3130 cal. This leads me to believe that to have a true 500 calorie deficit, I need to consume 2630 cal not even counting the exercise which would subtract 500 more cal from the deficit.Now I agree ahead of time that 1200 for lifestyle expenditure may be high, but even if you cut that by 50%, 2200 cal is way off for 190-200 lb guys. That is, if you believe in BMR and lifestyle expenditure.

    What is the correct way to calculate the deficit?

    Clif
     
  2. Black-Dawn

    Black-Dawn Well-Known Member

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    Monitor your food intake, exercise and compare with your results.

    all these formulas are just general guidelines they may not work well for you
    or alternatively they make work well for you while maintenaning but not while cutting (as they do for me).
    Don't get hung up on those calculations. Figure out your needed food intake from your results, but keep in mind
    that your energy needs are not static and may be effected by your energy intake. (slow down of metabolic rate on a long term cut for example)

    Shahar.
     
  3. NEdge

    NEdge Well-Known Member

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    Start at a 'guess', monitor weight. I would suggest every morning and average (VERY important) over 5 days and adjust until you are loosing consistently.

    I'd also suggest starting at a higher estimate and reduce from there. From those figures something in the 2600kcal range seems like it should be close unless you are a manual laborer or something similar. In that case adding 1200ckal to your BMR might be about right.

    You are correct that the BMR figure is (should be) too low by itself.
     
  4. JeremyLikness

    JeremyLikness Well-Known Member

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    The devil is in the details, isn't it?

    The easiest way is to ditch the equations because they are for the "median" and there are a lot of people who aren't on the median.

    Eat a consistent amount of calories. Exercise.

    If you aren't losing weight, obviously you guessed too high - exercise harder, longer, and/or eat less. Adjust until you find the right amount to consistently lose weight.

    Or use software like DietPower - this will take your daily weight, your calories consumed, and your exercise levels and compute your metabolic rate based on what's really happening and not just a vague equation that may be right for 25% of the population.

    Jeremy
     
  5. Bluestreak

    Bluestreak Well-Known Member

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    Jeremy's right. The best thing I did for myself when I started out was to set up an Excel spreadsheet and log meticulously all the data I could think to gather about my body as it changed. Later, I graphed the trends using the program and voila! I had data that told me how my body reacted to different styles of training and different nutritional applications.

    But that took time - I gathered 18 months worth of data stretching from when I started (4/03) to when I stopped logging the data around late 2004 when I had to stop training due to a shoulder injury. In retrospect, it's a habit I truly need to re-establish as it took me to some great success, as well as helped me learn about my body - and I still rely on that data and those trends today at times to conjure up plans. But... my body is very different some 2+ years later, and I wish I had kept training and logging the data to today. There's no telling what I could have achieved.

    I think I just convinced myself to resurrect my old spreadsheet tomorrow.

    -R
     
  6. Fluogen

    Fluogen Well-Known Member

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    Check out the Hacker's Diet for some great tools to track your weight loss. The spreadsheets include charts with trend lines and what your average daily calorie deficit or overage was. Very nice stuff considering he is just giving it all away.
     

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