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Calculating Floor Support for Heavy Gym? How to improve?

Discussion in 'Gym Equipment' started by Demonseed, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. Demonseed

    Demonseed Well-Known Member

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    Hey Guys,
    Last year we moved to a new/old house.... approx. 100 years old. The basement is far too low for my Conan so it has been sitting in pieces in my basement. My wife just gave me the green light to split the dinning room into half, which gives me a room for my gym. The issue that I am concerned with is the weight of the Conan and all my free weights. I estimate its about 2000 lbs!

    I will try to post pictures but basically the floor beams are solid wood, 2 inches thick, x about 9" tall. Running every 16" apart. The house is basically a square with the exterior the old cinder block. then the middle, there is a solid brick wall support wall. so each half is about 14 feet wide.

    The room where the gym is going, has the old school 2"wide wood flooring. and in the room currently there is a HUGE retro brick wall.... I would estimate it to be 10x10!! I would say each brick is 6 pounds... in the basement they put up 4x4 posts about the size of the brick to support it. I plan on taking it all out so that should help.

    So the question is.. is there a way to determine the load a floor can handle? Is there a way to determine the best /cheapeast way to support the floor? i.e.) beams? posts more joyces?

    I am in Ont, Canada.. what would a structural engineer cost? anyone have suggestions?

    Thanks
    Jim
     
  2. abuseguy

    abuseguy Active Member

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    Second time reply...

    Hello Jim,

    I already wrote this out once only to see that it never got posted. Here we go again.

    One of the first steps that a structural engineer would take is to consult span tables, which factor in your structural members + spacing in order to come up with a load estimate. Google "span tables" and you can find the reference along with tutorials. I would include the link again, but that could be what led to my post disappearing. Look for awc.org for some smart material.

    Next, I don't know what a Conan is -- can you post a link? Regardless, look at where the weight is on the unit. If there's an end with more weight, place it near the wall where it will bear more on the foundation. Also think about running the weight across the members (perpendicular) rather than parallel to them, so you're sharing the load. Spreading the weight out with a sub-floor could help, while also protecting the original lumber.

    Finally, for context: Many waterbeds weigh more than 1500 pounds according to many online references --including Wikipedia. In the basement, you can compensate by adding structural members across the bottom of the joists and adding temporary metal columns to carry the weight to the floor.

    Good luck. Your wife sounds very cool. I am still in the basement.

    Neil
     
  3. Demonseed

    Demonseed Well-Known Member

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    Hey
    Thanks.
    I have been researching, the problem is the gym has to go in the centre of the room.

    I estimate it to weight around 2000lbs with all my weights.

    It will site across multiple joists, but I think I will have to build a beam/columns in the center of the basement floor to support it.

    The Conan is the original Titan T1 home gym.

    Jim
     
  4. abuseguy

    abuseguy Active Member

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    >The Conan is the original Titan T1 home gym...

    Ah. I see. Great set up. Congrats.
     

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