1. JSF is shutting down soon. Please see this page for details.
    Dismiss Notice

Bmi

Discussion in 'Fat Loss/Cutting' started by Dead-head, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. Dead-head

    Dead-head Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is there anyone here that would tell me why Body Mass Index is any sort of good indicator at all?

    I'm 6' 2 1/2", and currently 245 lbs. I have a gut I'm working to cut, but am not extremely overweight. I feel like I would be very healthy at 215-225.

    I've also been a rather lean 245.

    I get very frustrated when sites like calorieking.com take only my height and weight and come up with some extremely high BF % and tell me I'm extremely obese. I could be the same height and weight I am now with a single digit BF%.

    -Frustrated with BMI
     
  2. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think I might be in the same boat - I have a large frame, and I think I'm outside the mean which the BMI represents. According to what my digital scale says re: my weight, height, and it's electronic mumbo jumbo electric resistance circuits, I have 166# of lean mass. At 6', 170 is the top of the healthy weight range. Obviously I won't be healthy with only 4 pounds of body fat! I'm shooting for 180, 185, at which point the BMI would say I would be overweight - but I'd actually be very cut.

    I'm not convinced that my digital scale is telling the correct body fat % either... so so I'm going to get a tapemeasure and try http://mybodycomp.com this week.
     
  3. bigjeff

    bigjeff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2004
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here's my $.02. The BMI is very easy to calculate. You don't need any special calipers or scales, just your weight and height, and maybe a calculator if you need it. The number it gives you is good for people that are not too athletic, and not into lifting weights and muscle mass etc. The BMI is good for my Mom, and my sisters, but for myself ( and most on JSF), it tells me I'm the top limit of "healthy"/"borderline obese" at 12.5% bodyfat.
    For you being 6'2" and lean (at one time) and 245, the BMI is just a couple random digits next to each other. One of my weight lifting friends is 6'0" and 250lbs, but he is pretty ripped, so it does him no good either. Don't put too much into it, go to a decent gym and maybe for a couple bucks someone there can take your BF % with some good calipers and give you a better idea of your fitness. Have a good one.

    Jeff
     
  4. U2rocks

    U2rocks Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0
    BMI doesnt take into account your muscle mass..so its best to rely more on body fat %
     
  5. Brian Golden

    Brian Golden Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    0
    At 163 lbs and 5'10" my BMI is 24, which is on the line of healthy-overweight.

    I can say that at 163 lbs that I am extremely healthy and no where close to being overweight; if anything, I'm close to being underweight. Calculate body fat, it's more accurate. BMI gives you a "very broad" estimate. If you're looking for accuracy, look into getting a body fat caliper.
     
  6. RTE

    RTE Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2004
    Messages:
    6,838
    Likes Received:
    4
    It is fairly accurate for the vast majority of our population. The same can be said for BMR and other estimates based on population sampling. There are always the exceptions.

    One problem we humans have is look for ways to justify our short comings instead of facing them. We need to make sure when we reject an estimate as not applying to us that we aren't fooling ourselves. We have to look in mirror from all angles and decide if the BMI appys to us.
     
  7. Andrew M

    Andrew M Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,031
    Likes Received:
    0
    The BMI is a population tool, rather than an individual tool.

    Your weight depends on your volume, so I've always believed that dividing by height cubed would give a better representation than height squared.

    One of my closest friends is 5'4", and when he was at his fittest (cycling about 200 miles per week, as well as x3 karate and x3 weights sessions) he was told at a pre-job medical that he was 'technically obese' by his BMI. He never knew his BF%, but at this time, he had an 8-pack, and striations on most muscle groups AT REST!
    At the other end of the scale, I'm 6'5", and the last time I was fit, my BMI still said I was well into the 'overweight' section.

    Andrew.
     
  8. hubladon

    hubladon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is a big deal for a lot of people. A friend of mine works in the medical underwriting department of a finance company, and they use BMI as a tool for assessing life insurance premiums. If the BMI says you're obese, you pay more - end of story. They get bodybuilders and fitness experts sending in pictures of themselves to prove otherwise, but they're not allowed to bend the rules.

    Like the other posters have said, it's statistically valid over a whole population to use BMI as an indicator of health risk, you just need to be aware if you're an exception.

    hubladon
     
  9. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    You're right.

    You hear that, Swolecat? According to your BMR - you're obese!

    :lol:
     

Share This Page