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Gemma Pea Protein Review
Old Fri, January 4th, 2008, 03:20 PM   #1
mastover
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Default Gemma Pea Protein Review

A few months ago, True Protein sent me 3 lbs of Gemma protein (vegetable based powder) before it officially went on sale. I recently finished about half the jar and due to recurring stomach issues with this protein powder, I've decided to give the rest away. I am extremely lactose intolerant, and even though a vegetable based powder does not contain dairy, I was experiencing many of the same symptoms of when I drink whey concentrate. The consistancy of this powder was very floury and it mixed extremely well. I had a premium vanilla flavor, and yet it still maintained a vegetable aftertaste. I was also unsure of the bioavailability of this type of protein, so conclusions are sketchy. For someone on a budget, it may be beneficial, but I would not recommend it to a hard training athlete, unless they were possibly mixing it with a higher grade protein fraction.

I will continue to use my regular protein powder of choice, but am also trying out TP's Hydrolized casein this week. I'll be using a new method with this, and will record my plan, thoughts, and results in my *Road To The Stage* journal.
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Old Fri, January 4th, 2008, 03:36 PM   #2
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What is the goal you are using the hydrolized casein for? Since it's a faster digesting protein than typical casein, it doesn't sound as much like an "overnight" product as casein only mixes tend to be used by many for. Is this a fast enough absorbing protein to be used near workouts?

Also, they say it's bitter, are you using it straight or in a blend?

Sorry to slightly change the subject.
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Old Fri, January 4th, 2008, 03:59 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MannishBoy View Post
What is the goal you are using the hydrolized casein for? Since it's a faster digesting protein than typical casein, it doesn't sound as much like an "overnight" product as casein only mixes tend to be used by many for. Is this a fast enough absorbing protein to be used near workouts?

Also, they say it's bitter, are you using it straight or in a blend?

Sorry to slightly change the subject.


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Old Fri, January 4th, 2008, 05:25 PM   #4
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Yeah, Gemma stinks. I love True Protein though...
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Old Fri, January 4th, 2008, 05:28 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MannishBoy View Post
What is the goal you are using the hydrolized casein for? Since it's a faster digesting protein than typical casein, it doesn't sound as much like an "overnight" product as casein only mixes tend to be used by many for. Is this a fast enough absorbing protein to be used near workouts?

Also, they say it's bitter, are you using it straight or in a blend?

Sorry to slightly change the subject.
"Effect of a hypocaloric diet, increased protein intake and resistance training on lean mass gains and fat mass loss in overweight police officers.

Demling RH, DeSanti L.

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. rhdemling@partners.org

We compare the effects of a moderate hypocaloric, high-protein diet and resistance training, using two different protein supplements, versus hypocaloric diet alone on body compositional changes in overweight police officers. A randomized, prospective 12-week study was performed comparing the changes in body composition produced by three different treatment modalities in three study groups. One group (n = 10) was placed on a nonlipogenic, hypocaloric diet alone (80% of predicted needs). A second group (n = 14) was placed on the hypocaloric diet plus resistance exercise plus a high-protein intake (1.5 g/kg/day) using a casein protein hydrolysate. In the third group (n = 14) treatment was identical to the second, except for the use of a whey protein hydrolysate. We found that weight loss was approximately 2.5 kg in all three groups. Mean percent body fat with diet alone decreased from a baseline of 27 +/- 1.8 to 25 +/- 1.3% at 12 weeks. With diet, exercise and casein the decrease was from 26 +/- 1.7 to 18 +/- 1.1% and with diet, exercise and whey protein the decrease was from 27 +/- 1.6 to 23 +/- 1.3%. The mean fat loss was 2. 5 +/- 0.6, 7.0 +/- 2.1 and 4.2 +/- 0.9 kg in the three groups, respectively. Lean mass gains in the three groups did not change for diet alone, versus gains of 4 +/- 1.4 and 2 +/- 0.7 kg in the casein and whey groups, respectively. Mean increase in strength for chest, shoulder and legs was 59 +/- 9% for casein and 29 +/- 9% for whey, a significant group difference. This significant difference in body composition and strength is likely due to improved nitrogen retention and overall anticatabolic effects caused by the peptide components of the casein hydrolysate. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 10838463 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]"
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Old Fri, January 4th, 2008, 05:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mastover View Post








Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorilla View Post
"Effect of a hypocaloric diet, increased protein intake and resistance training on lean mass gains and fat mass loss in overweight police officers.

Demling RH, DeSanti L.

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. rhdemling@partners.org

We compare the effects of a moderate hypocaloric, high-protein diet and resistance training, using two different protein supplements, versus hypocaloric diet alone on body compositional changes in overweight police officers. A randomized, prospective 12-week study was performed comparing the changes in body composition produced by three different treatment modalities in three study groups. One group (n = 10) was placed on a nonlipogenic, hypocaloric diet alone (80% of predicted needs). A second group (n = 14) was placed on the hypocaloric diet plus resistance exercise plus a high-protein intake (1.5 g/kg/day) using a casein protein hydrolysate. In the third group (n = 14) treatment was identical to the second, except for the use of a whey protein hydrolysate. We found that weight loss was approximately 2.5 kg in all three groups. Mean percent body fat with diet alone decreased from a baseline of 27 +/- 1.8 to 25 +/- 1.3% at 12 weeks. With diet, exercise and casein the decrease was from 26 +/- 1.7 to 18 +/- 1.1% and with diet, exercise and whey protein the decrease was from 27 +/- 1.6 to 23 +/- 1.3%. The mean fat loss was 2. 5 +/- 0.6, 7.0 +/- 2.1 and 4.2 +/- 0.9 kg in the three groups, respectively. Lean mass gains in the three groups did not change for diet alone, versus gains of 4 +/- 1.4 and 2 +/- 0.7 kg in the casein and whey groups, respectively. Mean increase in strength for chest, shoulder and legs was 59 +/- 9% for casein and 29 +/- 9% for whey, a significant group difference. This significant difference in body composition and strength is likely due to improved nitrogen retention and overall anticatabolic effects caused by the peptide components of the casein hydrolysate. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 10838463 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]"
But what were the protocols? Was this a workout drink, or just a supplement as a meal replacement?
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Old Fri, January 4th, 2008, 05:39 PM   #7
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Im not sure for this particular study. I do know a few guys who use it as their main PWO protein and swear by it.
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Old Sat, January 5th, 2008, 09:02 PM   #8
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Vegetable/plant based proteins are inferior to milk based proteins. The only reason they are starting to be pushed is because of the increasing wholesale cost of milk proteins. The industry is funny that way...
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Old Sat, January 5th, 2008, 09:55 PM   #9
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I heard that hemp protein has all the necessary amino acids.
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Old Sat, January 5th, 2008, 10:00 PM   #10
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I heard that hemp protein has all the necessary amino acids.
Have you ever tried hemp protein? Its like drinking mud...
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Old Sun, January 6th, 2008, 04:16 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Doubleoqueso View Post
I heard that hemp protein has all the necessary amino acids.
Having a complete amino acid profile doesn't equate to having maximum biological value. Even if the biological value is high, it also depends on how the protease enzymes in out bodies react to the plant based proteins. This has been inconclusive, and I am unaware of any controlled studies suppoting it. Any study would then have to be transferred into the real world of the gym and training. So far, I am unconvinced and would continue using animal based proteins. Now, if you are a vegan, this wouldn't apply.
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